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Fb2 The Tequila Worm ePub

by Viola Canales

Category: Literature and Fiction
Subcategory: Teenagers
Author: Viola Canales
ISBN: 0375840893
ISBN13: 978-0375840890
Language: English
Publisher: Wendy Lamb Books; Reprint edition (March 13, 2007)
Pages: 208
Fb2 eBook: 1816 kb
ePub eBook: 1235 kb
Digital formats: txt docx lrf doc

To Antonio Canales, my late father, for teaching me to follow my dreams. To Dora Casas Canales, my mother, for teaching me to love. Last, I thank all my family and friends, especially those who helped inspire this story: Veronica Canales, Antonio Canales J. Gustavo Canales, Gloria Tijerina, Sandra Canales, Minta Rivas, Consuelo Canales, Hilda Canales, Cecilia Canales, Gonzaga Vela, Lile Casas, Miguel Casas, Lucy Casas, Sara Bowser, Dinah Acord, and Irma Muñoz.

The Tequila Worm is a semi-biographical fiction work that Viola has poured her heart and soul into

Viola excelled in her studies and by the age of 15 she was accepted into a prestigious boarding school in Austin called St. Stephen’s Episcopal in Austin. The Tequila Worm is a semi-biographical fiction work that Viola has poured her heart and soul into. The Tequila Worm begins with the colorful stories hidden in exuberant Dona Clara's traveling bag.

Viola Canales was born in McAllen, Texas in 1957 and grew up in a. .The book depicts the struggle Sofia faces when you family discovers this news. And how family can lift you up but may sometimes hold you back.

The Tequila Worm is a semi-biographical fiction work that Viola has poured her heart and soul into.

I can’t believe you ate the tequila worm. Gross! How did it taste? Terrific! But it didn’t cure my problems. A tequila worm cures homesickness, not problems. Well, I’ve got two big ones. What are they? How to get those five new dresses and the four hundred dollars, I said. I told Mama that you and I had a plan. I even called you my comadre. Let me come over and show you the quinceañera pictures.

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Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People, 2006.

Family life, Neighborhoods, Mexican Americans, Catholics, Boarding schools, Schools, Families, Neighborhoods, Mexican Americans, Catholics, Boarding schools, Schools. New York : Wendy Lamb Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana. Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People, 2006.

Viola Canales is the author of Orange Candy Slices and Other Secret Tales (Arte Publico Press). People Who Read The Tequila Worm Also Read. Inspired by Your Browsing History. She lives in Stanford, California. Viola Canales is the author of Orange Candy Slices and Other Secret Tales (Arte Publico Press). Category: Teen & Young Adult Fiction Teen & Young Adult Social Issues.

Sofia comes from a family of storytellers.

Sofia comes from a family of storytellers. Here are her tales of growing up in the barrio, full of the magic and mystery of family traditions: making Easter cascarones, celebrating el Dia de los Muertos, preparing for quincea–era, rejoicing in the Christmas nacimiento, and curing homesickness by eating the tequila worm. When Sofia is singled out to receive a scholarship to an elite boarding school, she longs to explore life beyond the barrio, even though it means leaving her family to navigate a strange world of rich, privileged kids. It's a different mundo, but one where Sofia's traditions take on new meaning and illuminate her path.
Comments to eBook The Tequila Worm
Ranenast
Review of The Tequila Worm
Viola Canales forged a path through her accomplishments of graduating from Harvard Law School, and later becoming a Captain in the United States Army. As the author of The Tequila Worm she illuminated Mexican American culture in such a well written form that this novel has been awarded the Pura Belpre Award. With her Chicano background, Canales created a story about a girl named Sofia and her journey of self-discovery within the Mexican American culture and all its values in historical traditions.
In beginning of the novel, Sofia analyzes the people and culture around her in the Rio Grande Valley. Her Papa notices such realizations and assures her that there is great value in her culture even if the majority of the people she shares it with are not as wealthy as those on the other side of town. It is through life’s trials that Sofia along with Lucy (her younger sister), and Berta (her cousin) learn how their cultures riches are composed of the moral worth of its people and purpose of its traditions. At times of difficulty Sofia finds that her culture will always support her whether it be in the form of a comadre, the faith in a tequila worm, or taking part of traditions that allow her reminisce. The lesson on how to be a good comadre was taught threw the necessity of obtaining five dresses in order for Sofia to attend the boarding school of her dreams; she assists Berta in her quincenera in return for her aid in coming up with the dresses. Through these efforts they established a bound that they later find will last a life time. Upon arrival at the school, Terry becomes a mirror image of a bully that expressed strong views over Mexicans and their culture being inferior. By applying the same knowledge, she had acquired in the past experience, Sofia rose to all challenges both in academics and athletics- thus proving her worth and ability to compete with anyone of any race or background. While away from her family, the alter her Mama had given her and the mementoes her Papa gifted to her became a source of strength to continue her journey in a world of extreme wealth and predominantly White. As time ticked by Sofia found a greater love for her family and background to an extent that she carried those two significant elements with her soul.
As one reads it is inevitable to notice the careful construction of character development and plot structure. Canales utilizes the personality distinctions between Sofia and Berta in a method that creates a high contrast between the two girls. This resembles real life families as well as emphasizes Sofia’s search for more out of life and even the Rio Grande Valley, while Berta is maturing at a faster pace and follows the steps that the majority of the people around them have already taken. With important detail to the meaningful pieces that form and guide the story, Canales creates an impactful plot that resonates with the reader. The life like developments that challenges the characters are relatable to the extent that one cannot help being engaged in this literally work.
On a personal level, Sofia’s memories over her childhood triggered a flow of mine. Her past is filled with Chicano culture that it is sure to remind of yours- especially regarding empanadas, tamales, coffee and sobremesas. Even if you do not have the same background, the joy in these memories about quality meals and family time will bring a smile upon your face. It is on these types of memories that all can find comfort in.
The message over heritage and family is worth the read. With this remarkable novel’s break through, more and more young adults can see their culture on a national level.
Weiehan
The Tequila Worm begins as vignettes and then moves into a more traditional narrative when Sofia, the Mexican-American protagonist, is a fourteen-year-old high school freshman. In the beginning, a younger Sofia relays special family-centered moments–some downright hysterical and others more poignant–such as her First Communion, making cascarones for Easter, and celebrating both Halloween and Día de los Muertos. Throughout these moments, Sofia learns about her culture and, at times, is torn between her tight-knit community and the “American” world beyond her barrio in McAllen, Texas. After trick-or-treating in her neighborhood and then in another, wealthier part of town, Sofia has this conversation with her father:

“I wish I lived on the other side of town,” I said, looking out the window at the darkness.

“Why, mi’ja?”

“Because they live in nice houses, and they’re warm.”

“Ah, but there’s warmth on this side, too.”

“But…it’s really cold at home, and most of the houses around us are falling apart.”

“Yes, but we have our music, our foods, our traditions. And the warm hearts of our families.”

Another example is when Sofia is verbally bullied, called a “Taco Head” by students when she eats her homemade lunch at school. First, she is embarrassed and avoids the cafeteria entirely, spending that time on the playground or eating inside a stall in the girls’ bathroom to avoid ridicule. With the help of a P.E. teacher, Sofia returns to the lunch room, proudly eats her tacos in public, and is given the advice to get even, not by kicking the bully (which Sofia wants to do) but by kicking her butt at school.

Sofia, indeed, excels in academics and is offered a scholarship to St. Luke’s Episcopal School, a prestigious boarding school in Austin. Sofia’s family doesn’t understand why she wants to leave her home. When her mother asks, “But what’s wrong with here?” Sofia responds, “Nothing. But the Valley is not the whole world…I just want to see what’s out there.”

Eventually, Sofia’s family allows her to attend St. Luke’s, as long as she promises to remain connected and learn how to be a good comadre to her sister Lucy and cousin Berta. In the place she calls “Another Mundo,” Sofia learns to appreciate her family’s stories and traditions, understanding how they have shaped her and connected her to a community rich in other ways. The young girl who once hid after being called a “Taco Head,” grows into a young adult who is “brave enough to eat a whole tequila worm” and who confronts a classmate who writes a note telling Sofia to “wiggle back across the border.” Sofia responds by saying, “My family didn’t cross the border; it crossed us. We’ve been here for over three hundred years, before the U.S. drew those lines.”

The novel’s end leaps ahead in time, with Sofia as an adult, a civil rights lawyer living in San Francisco, who fights to preserve her changing neighborhood and who often visits to happily participate in the traditions she questioned as a child.

The novel’s main events are closely connected to the author’s life, as she, too, was raised in McAllen and attended a prestigious boarding school before attending Harvard University. Many of Canales’s own experiences, portrayed through Sofia, would be easily recognizable to younger Latinx readers who straddle two cultures and find value in each as they come of age.
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