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Fb2 Java I/O (Java Series) ePub

by Elliotte Rusty Harold

Category: Programming
Subcategory: Technologies and Computers
Author: Elliotte Rusty Harold
ISBN: 1565924851
ISBN13: 978-1565924857
Language: English
Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1st edition (March 26, 1999)
Pages: 600
Fb2 eBook: 1346 kb
ePub eBook: 1747 kb
Digital formats: mobi lit docx lrf

However, he currently resides in the University Town Center neighborhood of Irvine with his wife Beth, dog Shayna, and cats Charm (named after the quark) and Marjorie (named after his mother-in-law). Contents: Part 1 - Basic I/O: Introducing I/O; Output Streams; Input Streams.

However, he currently resides in the Prospect Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn with his wife Beth and dog Thor.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Elliotte Rusty Harold is an adjunct professor of computer science at Polytechnic University in Brooklyn, New York, where he lectures on object-oriented programming and XML. His Cafe con Leche Web site has become one of the most popular sites for information on XML. In addition, he is the author and coauthor of numerous books, the most recent of which are "The XML Bible" (John Wiley & Sons, 2001) and "XML in a Nutshell" (O'Reilly, 2002).

"JAVA: Easy Java Programming For Beginners- Your Step-By-Step Guide to Learning Java. Neural Network Programming with Java: Create and unleash the power of neural networks.

Author Rusty Harold Elliotte argues against this notion in Java I/O, a book that shows how Java's stream support can help simplify network programming,, and even compression and encryption. The book opens with an overview of Java's stream capabilities. The author defends Java's lack of support for console input/output (I/O) since today's applications use graphical user interfaces anyway. He shows how to open, read, and write local files in Java applications. His file viewer example presents data in a variety of formats.

Elliotte Rusty Harold is a noted writer and programmer, both on and off the Internet

Elliotte Rusty Harold is a noted writer and programmer, both on and off the Internet. Elliotte resides in New York City with his wife Beth and cat Possum.

Java also provides a sophisticated model for formatting textual and numeric data

Java also provides a sophisticated model for formatting textual and numeric data. Java I/O" shows you how to control number formatting, use characters aside from the standard (but outdated) ASCII character set, and get a head start on writing truly multilingual software. Java I/O" includes: Coverage of all I/O classes and related classesIn-depth coverage of Java's number formatting facilities and its support for International character sets.

Elliotte Rusty Harold is a noted writer and programmer, both on and off the Internet. He's currently fascinated by Java, which is beginning to consume his life. Elliotte resides in New York City with his wife Beth and cat Possum

Java provides many different kinds of streams, each with its own application. Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/Java I/O by Elliotte Rusty Harold.

Java provides many different kinds of streams, each with its own application.

All of Java's Input/Output (I/O) facilities are based on streams, which provide simple ways to read and write data of different types. Java provides many different kinds of streams, each with its own application. The universe of streams is divided into four large categories: input streams and output streams, for reading and writing binary data; and readers and writers, for reading and writing textual (character) data. You're almost certainly familiar with the basic kinds of streams--but did you know that there's a CipherInputStream for reading encrypted data? And a ZipOutputStream for automatically compressing data? Do you know how to use buffered streams effectively to make your I/O operations more efficient? Java I/O tells you all you ever need to know about streams--and probably more.A discussion of I/O wouldn't be complete without treatment of character sets and formatting. Java supports the UNICODE standard, which provides definitions for the character sets of most written languages. Consequently, Java is the first programming language that lets you do I/O in virtually any language. Java also provides a sophisticated model for formatting textual and numeric data. Java I/O shows you how to control number formatting, use characters aside from the standard (but outdated) ASCII character set, and get a head start on writing truly multilingual software.Java I/O includes:

Coverage of all I/O classes and related classesIn-depth coverage of Java's number formatting facilities and its support for International character sets
Comments to eBook Java I/O (Java Series)
Folsa
Was a major reference source with code examples when I was getting my B.S. in computer science at UNO. Well written, good index,
Tat
I'm a C++ programmer that has given himself a crash-course in Java for a project at work. If I had this book earlier, I would have gotten things done a lot faster. Every programmer should be familiar with input and output streams, but how many can say they know the in's and out's of Java's cryptographic streams and piped streams? If asked, could you tell the difference between a BufferedWriter and a PrintWriter? I had to use three books to accumulate the knowledge I could have gained by just reading this one book. If you are a beginning or intermediate Java programmer, don't assume you know everything about Java I/O and what it can do; check out the pearls of wisdom in this book. Needless to say, now I'm writing much better I/O-related Java code because of it, and I believe you will too.
Saberdragon
First of all, this is not a reference, it explains the organization behind the I/O Library. If you are looking for a reference book to locate answers in under a minute this ISN'T the book for you, instead get 'Java in a Nutshell'. Second of all, this book helps you to learn the I/O classes by constructing a program that you modify throughout the book. If that will annoy you, don't get this book. Overall, I think this is a great book! It was well worth the investment. I had previously encountered I/O documentation in more broadly scoped Java books such as, Beginning Java, in other words not much detail. This book, however, blew me away with its detail, but it is presented in a very down to earth manner. In other words, you don't have to be a rocket scientist to understand what's going on. This book will take you from the top of the I/O class hierarchy and move you down into the specialized sub-classes. All the while explaining to you what each of the classes does and like I said before, a lot of supporting details. Best of all, this book helps you understand I/O by showing you how Sun logically organized the I/O Library. By the time you've finished the book it's much easier to understand how all of the classes come together to offer powerful I/O support. Before I read this book when I looked at the inheritance tree for the I/O Library my reponse was like "you've got to be kidding me! I'll never be able to get all of this down!". But after finishing this book I am in no way intimidated or confused by the I/O classes. Good luck!
Mullador
The book is good, complete and shows you the details of I/O for Java (you should be at least an intermediate programmer); however, there are some errata that you must check in the web page of O'Reilly.
You can download the code of examples from the web page, and this code is corrected (it compiles and run), but some examples in the book are not: If you write down the code directly from the book you'll realize the problems.
I bought it in in mid 2001, but the corrections were not yet included in the edition I got, so supose you'll have to include them. Nevertheless, after doing it, you'll have a good book to study and use the I/O capabilities of Java.
Dagdage
For many programmers who started off using the command line as their primary I/O source, the Java system is a bit unusual. The simple, straightforward style of C is completely different than the various classes in Java. After reading through this book and delving into a few examples, Java's I/O classes became much clearer. The class structure makes a lot of sense, separating formatting from actual reading and writing, and allows for a great deal of flexibility. Although the author maligns the old command line style, much of the java.io package is based on streams and pipes from the Unix paradigm. This somewhat flippant disregard for the command line is my only major beef with the book. Otherwise, I found it to be very readable and handled all of the topics well.
Anardred
I had been using Java without really comprehending Java's approach to I/O. Other books never really explained what was going on to the extent that I could ever trust myself to write I/O code without having a book open.
This book clearly explains the theory and practice of Java I/O, and all the various features. It's the second most valuable Java book I own (Java in a Nutshell being the most frequently used). The book has led me to trying out facilities (such as compression and number formatting) that I otherwise shunned because of poor descriptions.
Bu
The basis of Java is to make hard things easy and easy things impossible. And among one of these impossibilites is standard I/O.
After having tried almost every single I/O class in Java and having been only able to get FileReader and FileWriter to work successfully, I decided to buy this book. I was afraid that I would get it and it would be so technical that only people who wear pocket protectors as their standard gear would be able to read it, but this was not a problem. Mr. Harrold was perfectly willing to lay everything out just as clearly as was physically possible, while at the same time still giving an equal amount of importance to examples.
Other reviewers seem to have viewed this as a weakness in the book, but personally, I would say that having an extra 50% percent of stuff you will never need is better than only having half of what is necessary to accomplish anything.
Due to my having bought this book, in the last month I have gone from basic file reading and writing, building my own file reader with a readLine() method of my own make since Sun's is buggy, to internet connections to having most recently written a proxy that logs all events that go on in my internet browser by concurrently handling six I/O operations(an in from the internet to two outs to my browser and log file, and an in from my browser to the two outs of the internet and my log file.) And I say this not to boast my prowess, but to show you just how valuable this book is to anyone who will be doing any Java programming that involves I/O.
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