» » Understanding Reading: A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read, Sixth Edition (Routledge Education Classic Edition)

Fb2 Understanding Reading: A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read, Sixth Edition (Routledge Education Classic Edition) ePub

by Frank Smith

Category: Schools and Teaching
Subcategory: Teaching and Education
Author: Frank Smith
ISBN: 0415808294
ISBN13: 978-0415808293
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (October 23, 2011)
Pages: 390
Fb2 eBook: 1225 kb
ePub eBook: 1618 kb
Digital formats: mbr lrf docx lrf

Frank Smith is recognized, both nationally and internationally, for his contributions to cognitive psychology and linguistics.

Frank Smith is recognized, both nationally and internationally, for his contributions to cognitive psychology and linguistics. He is a key originator of the modern psycholinguistic approach to reading instruction.

Published March 22nd 2012 by Routledge (first published January 1st 1971).

Understanding Reading book. Published March 22nd 2012 by Routledge (first published January 1st 1971). Understanding Reading: A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read.

Fully updated, it examines current theories, instructional practices and controversies. Yet a chasm separates.

A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read . This page intentionally left blank. The aim is to make these topics comprehensible, with the assumption that many readers will have neither the time nor the ex

oceedings{ngRA, title {Understanding Reading: A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and . The Essence of Reading. Comprehension and Knowledge.

oceedings{ngRA, title {Understanding Reading: A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read. author {Frank Smith}, year {1971} }. Frank Smith. Information and Experience. Between Eye and Brain. Bottlenecks of Memory. Letter Identification. Phonics and Mediated Word Identification. The Identification of Meaning. Reading, Writing, and Thinking

Understanding Reading: A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read.

Understanding Reading: A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read. Download (pdf, 2. 6 Mb) Donate Read. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1982. Pp. xii + 263. S. Jay Samuels (a1). University of Minnesota. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 28 November 2008.

Rent Understanding Reading at Chegg. com and save up to 80% off list price and 90% off used textbooks. ISBN13: 9780415808293.

Coupon
Comments to eBook Understanding Reading: A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read, Sixth Edition (Routledge Education Classic Edition)
DireRaven
This book was required for a graduate course in the psychology of reading. It was not too difficult to read and understand even though one in the field of reading may not necessarily agree with everything the author says. The author takes a more holistic approach to reading and its implications for classroom application.
Saberblade
There are two seminal books on reading: (1) "The Psychology and Pedagogy of Reading" by E.B. Huey (1908); and (2) "Understanding Reading" by Frank Smith (1971). Smith's book, now in its 6th and final edition, combines different areas of study to provide an understanding of the proficient reader. To understand reading requires understanding how language works and how learning works. It requires knowing the role that short-term memory plays in reading and the visual processing limitations of the eye and brain. Smith has integrated concepts from a range of disciplines superbly. This book is a classic, and Smith's ideas and insights about reading will influence scholars and teachers for generations to come.
Opilar
The Kindle version of this book (ironically a textbook on reading) has annoying errors that make it unpleasant to read- for example, the commas are all apostrophes.
Mogelv
If you have any interest in what really happens in the reading process as well as in learning to read, this book is a "must read." Even the notes in the back are excellent. I have studied the reading process for over 22 years, and have never read a better explanation of the process. This book is a pleasure to read. I could not put it down.
Darkshaper
Frank Smith presents problems for a reviewer. He is exceptionally smart, writes extremely well, and seems endlessly sincere. However, he has expended his talents in the promotion of Whole Word, a reading pedagogy that works better in theory than practice.

Understanding Reading--A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read (Fifth Edition, 1994) consists of the original, vastly influential book published in 1971, plus 90 pages of new ideas and research.

Smith is brilliant at the flabbergasting finality: "Fluent reading does not normally require the identification of individual letters or words." (For more, Google my essay "The War Against Reading.")

Smith's point is always the same: phonics is not needed, and Whole Word is the preferred method. Smith is considered Whole Word's chief apostle.

One is reminded that Lord Kelvin stated flatly in 1895 that heavier-than-air flight was impossible; and the New York Times proclaimed that rockets would never be launched into space. Upon seeing these claims proven wrong by reality, a scientist says, "Sorry about that." The priests in charge of Whole Word rarely have such epiphanies. Whole Word is for me a cloud-cuckoo land.

Significantly, this pedagogy does not claim to teach children to read until they are close to college age. The typical goal is that children will memorize 500 word-shapes per year (which is high for most children). Do the math: the smarter kids know less than 5000 words in the 10th grade, and are thus unable to read in any real sense.

All the experts I trust (Rudolph Flesch, Marva Collins, Samuel Blumenfeld, Mona McNee, Don Potter) make the same claim: 99% of children can be taught to read by the age of 7, or 8 at latest. This is the gold standard. If you can beat this, please speak up. If your theories lead to semi-literacy well into high school, please find new theories.

Consider these six-letter words: places spring rubber dhzept vhkwcx nshwtq. A person literate in English knows instantly that the last three "words" are not words. Victims of Whole Word cannot detect this. You could tell these victims that the last word means: "location." They would say, okay, and try to find some way to recall that "nshwtq" is pronounced "location." Such victims know nothing of the internal dynamics of English words, that sounds are captured in consistent and predictable ways. For the victims of Whole Word, every word is just a pile of sticks, a random assortment of scratches going in different directions. Frank Smith says you can easily memorize 50,000 of these irrational designs. Experience shows that one-third of kids can't memorize even 2000 and are therefore labeled "functional illiterates," a dire fate in our complex society.

Similarly, a person literate in English knows that "busy" is a word but "bsuy" is probably a typo. A Whole Word victim sees nothing odd about "bsuy." English words are basically learned like phone numbers. There's nothing odd about 1587649 compared to 1857649. Reversals are common when humans try to memorize either Whole Numbers or Whole Words. How many people could memorize even 100 phone numbers, never mind 500? In reading, such reversals are called dyslexia, an illusory problem created by an illusory pedagogy.

My own sense is that Whole Word occupies a unique distinction in American history: the single largest and most damaging scam. More than 70 years. More than 50 million victims. What else comes close?

(PS: I created 6 graphic videos for YouTube that explain the problems in Smith's thinking; search "Phonics versus Whole Word.")
Siralune
I have to give this book a 1-star rating because I was sent the 2nd edition when I ordered the 6th edition shown on this page. I ordered the book used from a third-party vendor and said to cancel the order if it was an old edition, but they sent it anyway and Amz did not stand behind their guarantee because they said that the 2nd edition is not "materially different" from the 6th edition. If that is true, then the 6th edition is as badly out of date and lacking as the 2nd edition is.
Ghordana
Very dry and boring. Had to read it for a course. I did not enjoy it.
Related to Understanding Reading: A Psycholinguistic Analysis of Reading and Learning to Read, Sixth Edition (Routledge Education Classic Edition)
Understanding Teaching and Learning: Classic Texts on Education by Augustine, Aquinas, Newman and Mill (St Andrews Studies in Philosophy and Public Affairs) eBook
Fb2 Understanding Teaching and Learning: Classic Texts on Education by Augustine, Aquinas, Newman and Mill (St Andrews Studies in Philosophy and Public Affairs) ePub
Text Representation: Linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects (Human Cognitive Processing) eBook
Fb2 Text Representation: Linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects (Human Cognitive Processing) ePub
Caught Reading the Sixth Time eBook
Fb2 Caught Reading the Sixth Time ePub
Directory of learning resources for reading eBook
Fb2 Directory of learning resources for reading ePub
Online Education for Lifelong Learning eBook
Fb2 Online Education for Lifelong Learning ePub
Phonics and Structural Analysis for the Teacher of Reading: Programmed for Self-Instruction (10th Edition) eBook
Fb2 Phonics and Structural Analysis for the Teacher of Reading: Programmed for Self-Instruction (10th Edition) ePub
The Routledge Education Studies Reader eBook
Fb2 The Routledge Education Studies Reader ePub
Ready-To-Use Vocabulary, Word Analysis Comprehension Activities: Sixth Grade Reading Level (Reading Skills Activities Library) eBook
Fb2 Ready-To-Use Vocabulary, Word Analysis  Comprehension Activities: Sixth Grade Reading Level (Reading Skills Activities Library) ePub
Understanding research in education: An introductory guide to critical reading eBook
Fb2 Understanding research in education: An introductory guide to critical reading ePub