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Fb2 Declare: A Novel ePub

by Tim Powers

Category: Thrillers and Suspense
Subcategory: Suspense and Thriller
Author: Tim Powers
ISBN: 0380976528
ISBN13: 978-0380976522
Language: English
Publisher: William Morrow; 1st edition (January 9, 2001)
Pages: 528
Fb2 eBook: 1469 kb
ePub eBook: 1732 kb
Digital formats: rtf azw mbr doc

Tim Powers' 2001 novel "Declare" is another of those books that are better than OK but not quite good enough for Very Good.

Tim Powers' 2001 novel "Declare" is another of those books that are better than OK but not quite good enough for Very Good. Of course, it's interesting that I say that since the book won both the 2001 World Fantasy Award for Best Novel and the 2001 International Horror Guild Award for Best Novel.

Declare (2000) is a supernatural spy novel by American author Tim Powers. The novel presents a secret history of the Cold War, and earned several major fantasy fiction awards. The non-linear plot, shifting back and forth in time from the 1940s to 1960s, mainly concerns Andrew Hale, a scholar and occasional operative for a secret British spy organization

Timothy Thomas "Tim" Powers (born February 29, 1952) is an American science fiction and fantasy author. Powers has won the World Fantasy Award twice for his critically acclaimed novels Last Call and Declare.

Timothy Thomas "Tim" Powers (born February 29, 1952) is an American science fiction and fantasy author. His 1987 novel On Stranger Tides served as inspiration for the Monkey Island franchise of video games and was optioned for adaptation into the fourth Pirates of the Caribbean film.

Tim Powers Tim Powers. The Anubis Gate is the classic time travel novel that took the fantasy world by storm a decade ago.

In the final book of the Fault Lines Trilogy, the race is on to resurrect the murdered Fisher King of the American West and save the life of his successor from supernatural enemies. Scott Crane, the Fisher King of the American West, is dead, killed by a possessed Janis Cordelia Plumtree.

Page 11. "I follow you. I'm not a longtime Soviet plant, obviously, since they'd know that wasn't so. Mossad? Have I secretly been a Zionist all along?"

DECLARE is Tim Powers' take on a British, Le Carre style spy novel, with his own added supernatural twists. Any book that reads for 100 pages like a Le Carre spy novel before it diverts into the fantastic is a blast.

DECLARE is Tim Powers' take on a British, Le Carre style spy novel, with his own added supernatural twists. And as such, it's a resounding success. What starts in murky waters in the British spy. If you don't mind and Cold War conspiracies mashed together, this is a book for you. Читать весь отзыв.

Two decades later, in 1963, he will be forced to confront again the nightmare that has haunted his adult life: a lethal unfinished operation code-named Declare.

Genres : Fantasy, Science Fiction. Two decades later, in 1963, he will be forced to confront again the nightmare that has haunted his adult life: a lethal unfinished operation code-named Declare. From the corridors of Whitehall to the Arabian desert, from post-war Berlin to the streets of Cold War Moscow, Hale's desperate quest draws him into international politics and gritty espionage tradecraft - and inexorably drives Hale, the fiery and beautiful Communist agent Elena Teresa Ceniza-Bendiga, and Kim Philby, mysterious traitor to the British cause, to a deadly confrontation on.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Declare - Tim Powers.

But he glanced fearfully back over his shoulder, at the looming mountain-the unsubdued power in the night was back there, up among the craggy high fastnesses of Mount Ararat. He turned back to the frail beam of light that stretched down the slope ahead of him to light the three stumbling figures, and he increased the pressure of his foot on the accelerator, and he wished he dared to pray. He didn't look again at the mountain.

Simon Prebble, Tim Powers and Declare hit perfect notes The novel begins with a young spy fleeing a failed secret mission atop Mount Ararat. That mount Ararat, which immediately gets my occult Spidey-sense tingling.

Simon Prebble, Tim Powers and Declare hit perfect notes. This book was a superb fit for Prebbles dignified sense of expression and carefully paced timing. I will also say that I liked some of the discriptive paragraphs so much that I bought the Kindle book so I could read them myself. This is just a good read. The novel begins with a young spy fleeing a failed secret mission atop Mount Ararat.

There are histories beneath history. Tim Powers, one of the most brilliant and audacious talents in contemporary fiction, casts an eerie light on the terrible events that made the twentieth century and reveals what the Cold War was really about.

Declare

After a ten-year hiatus, British academic Andrew Hale is abruptly called back into the Great Game by a terse, cryptic telephone message. Born to "the trade" and recruited at the age of seven by a most secret Secret Service, Hale, in 1963, is forced to confront again the nightmare that has haunted his adult life: a lethal unfinished operation code-named Declare.

Two decades earlier, as a young double agent infiltrating the Soviet spy network in Nazi-occupied Paris, Hale first encountered the incomprehensible rhythms of an invisible world. And from that moment on nothing was ever safe and knowable again. There also, his life became eternally linked with two others' lives that would recurrently intersect his at its most dangerous junctures: his "comrade operative," the fiery and beautiful Communist agent Elena Teresa Ceniza-Bendiga, the object of Hale's undying love, and Kim Philby, the mysterious traitor to the British cause...and perhaps to all humanity. Together they form an unlikely trimuvirate with one shared destiny: Declare.

But the Great Game is greater and far more terrible than Andrew Hale ever imagined. There is another, larger war raging unseen all around him, a cataclysmic secret conflict masked by a "Cold War" of national ideologies. And it is drawing Hale, Elena, and Philby inexorably toward world-shattering consequences on a Biblical mountain in the Middle East...and to a hideous feast of broken minds, destroyed lives, and devoured souls.

The remarkable imagination of Tim Powers has wedded John le Carré with Clive Barker to create something unlike anything previously contained between book covers. A sweeping epic adventure, a love story, a revelation, a nightmare, it is our past and our world as something other...Declare!

Comments to eBook Declare: A Novel
Olwado
If you like Fleming or LeCarre, you'll find the pacing, settings and characters of this book to be your cup of tea. The text is divided into three "books."
Book 1 deals firmly with the characters and introduces a few supernatural elements - nothing to distract you from a ripping WW2 spy yarn interspersed with past and future time segments. Some might find this narrative style annoying. The patient reader will find they support the story and introduce the principles.
Book 2 veers unmistakably into the occult, revealing the long term, arcane plot known as Project Declare. I won't spoil anything here.
Book 3 brings all the elements together to a fast-paced conclusion. It's a satisfying if slightly unlikely ending - strangely enough the only part of the narrative that stretched my suspension of disbelief. The ending doesn't spoil the story, it's just slightly "untrue" to the author's stated influences.

Overall, it was a vivid, exciting book that didn't bog itself down in too many details. You get enough to hold your interest without a hint of excessive, self-indulgent prose. Pacing almost never slackens. This was totally my kind of read. I would heartily recommend it.
zzzachibis
"Where was thou when I laid the foundations of the Earth -- Declare if thou hast understanding." Job 38:4

I have a handful of books I can re-read, and get something new out of them each time. Declare is one of those remarkable stories, the foundations so layered and dense that some subtleties of character and theme appear only after the first read. It seems silly to say that Declare crosses genres. It's fantastic espionage fiction, (like Fleming's 007 or O'Donnell's Modesty Blaise), but deeper and wider of scope, with historical and supernatural elements.

Main character Andrew Hale is the son of a former Catholic nun and unknown father. He grows up shuttling between religions, subject to strange dreams. As an adult he becomes a member of a rather special branch of British Intelligence. His story travels from the 1940s to the 1960s, encompassing Kim Philby, Middle East spy networks, double double agents, lasting love for a communist agent, supernatural happenings on Mount Ararat, and the story of Russia's special protector.

Be prepared to take your time, let Powers ease you into the story. Give the characters a chance to form and acquire substance. Declare is a read worth a little extra patience before you get to the action bits!

* I also highly recommend the audio version of Declare.
Vertokini
Tim Powers' 2001 novel "Declare" is another of those books that are better than OK but not quite good enough for Very Good. So, even though I'm formally rating it at a Very Good 4 stars out of 5, I'd really like to make that a 3-1/2 star rating. Of course, it's interesting that I say that since the book won both the 2001 World Fantasy Award for Best Novel and the 2001 International Horror Guild Award for Best Novel. If you've read any Powers before, you've got a good idea what to expect: he takes some historical facts (in this case, a lot of World War II/Cold War stuff mostly driven by the life of Kim Philby -- so I highly recommend you read the Wikipedia article on him (material on his father, St. John Philby, and T.E. Lawrence might be useful, too)) and intersperses them with weird things for a different interpretation. The writing is good, though it does suffer quite a bit by the pacing issue most of his "historical fiction" is prone to. Also, in this book, he tells the tale in non-chronological order and we find out a lot of things near the beginning that happen near the end but have no idea what they mean until we weave our way there. It's an interesting way to present the story, but it is a bit frustrating and confusing. Personally, I'd have preferred a much more linear telling. Still, it's a very good book and he ties everything up very neatly at the end.
Swiang
One of my favorite Tim Powers novels (and I am a fan), DECLARE is a tip of the hat to spy novels but is full of Powers' spiritual thriller qualities, too, making for a very interesting and complex read. Lots of accurate Kim Philby history here, and Lawrence of Arabia, too - I love the way Powers researches and seamlessly incorporates real history into his flights of fancy.
Connorise
My title says it all, I have read all of his books and loved them ALL. This is his take on a "Spy Novel". If you wish to find out how badly Disney/Hollywood can #$%@&-up a great story read his "On Stranger Tides" which was "Raped" for it's title, that was used on a crappy
POC* movie. It was also a great book, but I repeat myself, as it is by:
Tim Powers!
* Pirates of the Caribbean
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