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Fb2 The Man Who Knew Too Much ePub

by Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Suspense and Thriller
Author: Gilbert Keith Chesterton
ISBN: 1434617920
ISBN13: 978-1434617927
Language: English
Publisher: BiblioBazaar (May 5, 2007)
Pages: 176
Fb2 eBook: 1795 kb
ePub eBook: 1231 kb
Digital formats: azw doc lit mbr

Gilbert Keith Chesterton. I. the face in the target. March looked at the low-browed crag overhanging the green slope and nodded

Gilbert Keith Chesterton. March looked at the low-browed crag overhanging the green slope and nodded. He was interested in a man who turned so easily from the technicalities of science to those of art; and asked him if he admired the new angular artists. As I feel it, the Cubists are not Cubist enough," replied the stranger. I mean they're not thick enough.

The Man Who Knew Too Much and other stories (1922) is a book of detective stories by English writer G. K. Chesterton, published in 1922 by Cassell and Company in the United Kingdom. Chesterton, published in 1922 by Cassell and Company in the United Kingdom, and Harper Brothers in the United States. The book contains eight connected short stories about "The Man Who Knew Too Much", and additional unconnected stories featuring separate heroes/detectives.

This contains the first 8 of the 12 stories in the published book The Man Who Knew Too Much and Other Stories

This contains the first 8 of the 12 stories in the published book The Man Who Knew Too Much and Other Stories. In these 8 detective thrillers, the main protagonist is Horne Fisher. Due to close relationships with the leading political figures in the land, Fisher knows too much about the private politics behind the public politics of the day. This knowledge is a burden to him because he is able to uncover the injustices and corruptions of the murders in each story, but in most cases the real killer gets away with the killing because to bring him openly to justice would create a greater chaos: starting a war, reinciting Irish rebellions, or removing public faith in the government.

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) was an influential and prolific English writer of the early 20th century. He was a journalist, a poet and a novelist. He wrote 80 books and 200 short stories in addition to his other work

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) was an influential and prolific English writer of the early 20th century. He wrote 80 books and 200 short stories in addition to his other work.

The man walking with the lady was no other than the eminent PrinceBorodino, who was at least as. .In most matters she could command herbrother, though that nobleman, like many other men of vague ideas,was not without a touch of the bully when he was at bay.

The man walking with the lady was no other than the eminent PrinceBorodino, who was at least as famous as a distinguished diplomatistought to be, in the interests of what is called secret diplomacy. Hehad been paying a round of visits at various English country houses,and exactly what he was doing for diplomacy at Prior's Park was asmuch a secret as any diplomatist could desire.

Meet Frances Chesterton Get to know Mrs. Chesterton. The eight adventures in this classic British mystery trace the activities of Horne Fisher, the man who knew too much, and his trusted friend Harold March. Although Horne’s keen mind and powerful deductive gifts make him a natural sleuth, his inquiries have a way of developing moral complications. Notable for their wit and sense of wonder, these tales offer an evocative portrait of upper-crust society in pre–World War I England.

Start by marking The Man Who Knew Too Much as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Man Who Knew Too Much as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I must admit I wanted to read this book because I have a particular fondness for GK Chesterton’s immensely likeable Father Brown series-the little Catholic priest is one of my favourite detectives, and one of the stories which feature him (The Queer Feet) I rate as the cleverest, most ingenious detective short story I've ever read.

I told you that I know too much," replied Fisher, with his eye on the river. I know that, and I know a great many other things. I know the atmosphere and the way the whole thing works. She did not analyze the audacious trick by which the man had turned to his advantage the subtle effects of the expected and the obvious; she was still under the cloud of more individual complexities, and she noticed most of all that the vanishing scarecrow did not even turn to look at the farm. And the fates that were running so adverse to his fantastic career of freedom ruled that his next adventure, though it had the same success in another quarter, should increase the danger in this quarter.

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Next . The Man Who Knew Too Much. Claim the "The Man Who Knew Too Much.

Everyone who was not born a duke and who has not achieved a premiership will congratulate himself after reading these detective stories of crimes among the upper classes. The criminal hunter in the case never brings the criminals to justice though he captures every one. Yet his work is invaluable.

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. This text refers to the Bibliobazaar edition.
Comments to eBook The Man Who Knew Too Much
luisRED
Let's face it- you either like late Victorian/early 20th century mysteries or you don't. There doesn't seem to be any middle ground. The language is more formal and, in the short stories especially, the mysteries tend to be simpler, less complex than later works. It isn't until later in the era with Sayres , Marsh, Christie etc that the stories seem to connect with modern readers.

It happens that I do enjoy these mysteries and other fiction from that time and have been reading a lot of it lately. I wasn't familiar with Chesterton other than some Father Brown short stories so I thought I would try this free kindle version of "The Man Who Knew Too Much" (Nothing to do with the Hitchcock movies, by the way:-))

I'm not surprised now that I had never met Thorne Fisher, "The Man Who Knew Too Much". Set in the years leading up to WWI and heavily involved with the politics of the time, initially these stories seemed to be standard fare for the genre. But there was a subtle subversive twist in each one, rare in mysteries especially at that time, that kept me interested. Then in the final two stories, the full picture emerges. All of the stories coalesce and this becomes, not a collection of short stories, but a striking novel. Publishing one story separate from the others would completely ruin the impact of the whole.

If I were rating this book based on one or two stories, I would probably have given it four stars- three as OK for its genre and one for that unusual twist. But taken as a whole, I have to say I love it. I think it is far more than most of its contemporaries.
Nalme
I chose this book on a whim because it was short, and I figured that even I (with all the distractions of homeschooling) could make it through quickly. Well! The book actually took FOREVER to read.... because I continuously needed to go back and re-read the good parts. And there were so many good parts! The author is so deliciously descriptive that you just want to memorize the whole thing. A fun detective read, and an interesting look into the attitudes, social biases, and prejudices of the time period.
Swift Summer
Boy was I fooled by the charming snarky first mystery, because the adventures of Horne Fisher only get weirder and just a little bit more and more depressing as you go along. Horne Fisher is cynical, snarky, a genius, and adamantly patriotic. It's no spoiler to say that every mystery ends with Fisher deducing the improbable series of events...and then just lets the darn murderer go for some greater good. And that schtick is both fascinating and really, really frustrating after a while.

I liked "The Vanishing Prince" a lot, which had a clever solution to the mystery of how the heck one guy absolutely wrecked a group of policemen when he was surrounded on all sides. When Chesterton hits his stride, his writing is delightfully witty and unravels in surprising ways. At worst, the setups get so convoluted with red herrings you shrug and say, "What? What was that all about?" The last story, "The Vengeance of the Statue," is --for better or for worse-- a logical end to Horne Fisher's adventures...cranked up to eleven at the last moments.

Now, I listened to Harold Wiederman's audiobook narration. I'm a big fan of audiobooks, but I think this doesn't work for audiobook at all. So much of Chesterton's witty prose and Horne Fisher's clever reveals are "blink and you miss it;" it doesn't help that Wiederman's voices (as comfortingly British as his voice is) sound kinda the same and monotone. Save yourself a lot of confusion and just read it yourself at your own pace.
Umge
"The Man Who Knew Too Much" is an enjoyable read about the dirty world of politics and intrigue. Horne Fisher (equivalent to Sherlock) Harold March (equivalent to Watson) discover in less than obvious ways conclusions to heinous crimes and dirty dealings.

But unfortunately, this book is realistic. The good guys do not win. And the bad guys do not lose. This then is from Chesterton, part mystery and part political commentary of the corruption of the English government during his time. For Chesterton things are never as they seem--and the man who knows too much is too enveloped in the muck to do anything about it.

I like Chesterton, and this is well written. However, I prefer Orthodoxy and Manalive to the rapid mysteries in quick succession in this volume. Many times I lost track of Chesterton in the midst of a twist due to the amount of characters he had introduced.

Still, a good read. And if you like it you should try Orthodoxy.
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