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Fb2 The Herbaceous Layer in Forests of Eastern North America ePub

by Frank Gilliam

Category: Nature and Ecology
Subcategory: Science books
Author: Frank Gilliam
ISBN: 0199837651
ISBN13: 978-0199837656
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 2 edition (March 5, 2014)
Pages: 688
Fb2 eBook: 1192 kb
ePub eBook: 1426 kb
Digital formats: docx lrf doc lrf

a variety of forest ecosystem types in eastern North America. All content in this area was uploaded by Frank S Gilliam on Sep 17, 2018.

All content in this area was uploaded by Frank S Gilliam on Sep 17, 2018.

Frank S. Gilliam is at Marshall University. Mark R. Roberts is at University of New Brunswick. Subjects include nutrient cycling, ecophysiology, composition, interaction with overstory, temporal and spatial dynamics, disturbance, invasion, and more. This is a text that has been long-needed, and includes numerous references that will be helpful for graduate and undergraduate students alike.

Focusing on the oft-overlooked herbaceous layer of eastern forests . Categories: Medicine\Pharmacology.

Focusing on the oft-overlooked herbaceous layer of eastern forests, this volume combines perspectives from different levels of biological organization (ecophysiology to ecosystems) and forest types (from the eastern boreal forest to southeastern pine forests) into a synthesis of our knowledge of the ecology of this important forest layer.

Focusing on the oft-overlooked herbaceous layer of eastern forests, this . Department of Biological Sciences Frank S Gilliam, Frank S. Gilliam, Mark R. Roberts

Focusing on the oft-overlooked herbaceous layer of eastern forests, this volume combines perspectives from different levels of biological organization (ecophysiology to ecosystems) and forest types (from the eastern boreal forest to southeastern pine forests) into a synthesis of our knowledge of the ecology of this important forest layer. Roberts.

We have been selling books online for over ten years and we have learned how to save students from the inflated costs of textbooks . Focusing on the oft-overlooked herbaceous layer of eastern forests, this volume combines perspectives from different levels of biological organization and forest types into a synthesis of our knowledge of the ecology of this important forest layer.

Archaeology: Classical. Archaeology: Non-Classical. Asian and Middle Eastern History: BCE to 500CE. British and Irish History: BCE to 500CE. European History: BCE to 500CE.

Over the last decade, the field of plant ecology has significantly developed and expanded, especially in research concerning the herbaceous layer and ground vegetation of forests. This revised second edition of The Herbaceous Layer in Forests of Eastern North America accounts for that growth, presenting research that approaches the ecology of the herb layer of forests from a variety of disciplines, perspectives, and levels of ecological organization. The book synthesizes the research of top ecologists on herbaceous layer structure, composition, and dynamics of a variety of forest ecosystem types in eastern North America. The 2003 first edition of The Herbaceous Layer in Forests of Eastern North America was praised for containing the most extensive listing of herb-layer literature in existence. This second edition brings this material up to date, revised to include current research, data, and concepts. The book incorporates quantitative data to support analyses that were previously unavailable during the publication of the first edition. Also featured are eight entirely new chapters, with six of these focused on the response of the herbaceous layer to a wide variety of natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Building on the over 1,200 references and sources of the first edition, the second edition of The Herbaceous Layer in Forests of Eastern North America, with well over 2,500 references, is an invaluable resource for plant ecologists, forest ecologists, conservationists, and forest managers.
Comments to eBook The Herbaceous Layer in Forests of Eastern North America
Taun
Well written by different authors, it updates the first edition and is a good buy, albeit expensive, for those interested in the field.
Kirinaya
Here's the text of a review of this book that I published in 2015 in the botanical journal Rhodora, volume 117: 109-111.

The forest understory: botanists adore it, deer eat it, foresters step over it, and, thanks to Frank Gilliam and his colleagues, ecologists now know a lot more about the herbaceous layer that carpets the ground beneath the trees. Just over 10 years ago (in 2003), Frank Gilliam and Mark Roberts edited the first edition of The Herbaceous Layer in Forests of Eastern North America. When the first edition of The Herbaceous Layer was published, fewer than 10,000 papers (ca. 1950–2000) had been published on the ecology of “the forest stratum composed of all vascular species ≤ 1 m in height” (p. 4: definition of the herbaceous layer). According to Gilliam’s data in Chapter 1 of the new edition, however, in the last decade alone more than 20,000 more papers have been added to this canon. This accelerating interest undoubtedly was sparked by the publication of the first edition of The Herbaceous Layer, and it would be no surprise if the publication of the second edition fanned the intellectual fires still further.
The second edition of The Herbaceous Layer is 50% longer than the first. It includes eight new chapters (of 22 total), and nearly twice as many references in its 124-page long, exhaustive bibliography. All of the original chapters are still present and most have been substantially updated: authors and sections have been added, literature reviews generally cover current work, and nomenclature reflects newer floras. The production is, for the most part, better as well. The type-face is crisper and, although a point or two smaller in size, easier to read. Graphs have been redrawn, jittery cross-hatching eliminated in favor of gentle shading, and font labels applied consistently across chapters. On the other hand, presumably in the interest of saving some paper and keeping the book to a manageable size, margins extend nearly to the top and bottom of each page and the paper-weight is thin leading to bleed-through of text and figures. The resulting tome at times feels as dense as the forest understory it describes.
The Herbaceous Layer is divided into four parts. The first includes three chapters on “The Environment.” In these chapters, the “environment” refers to nutrient cycling and the vernal dam (by Robert Muller), ecophysiology (Howard Neufeld and Donald Young), and biotic-abiotic interactions (Wendy Anderson). Of these three chapters, Neufeld and Young’s is the most thoroughly updated; it includes an entire new section on ecophysiological responses of forest herbs to climate change and warming experiments, and much expanded information on carbon gain and respiration. In contrast, Muller and Anderson’s updates are restricted to a few new references.
The second part covers “Population Biology.” In the first edition, this part had but a single chapter—conservation of rare understory herbs (by Claudia Jolls). For the new edition, Jolls thoroughly revised her chapter in partnership with Dennis Whigham and highlighted new efforts in understory plant conservation, including the Smithsonian Institution’s new North American Orchid Conservation Center. This part now also includes a completely new chapter on mating systems and floral biology (by Carol Goodwillie and Claudia Jolls). This chapter places a detailed contrast of two regional floras – Harvard Forest in Massachusetts and Crabtree Creek in western North Carolina – in the context of a review of global plant reproductive traits. This kind of synthesis was barely envisioned a decade ago, but now provides ample directions for much new research.
The third part, “Community Dynamics across Spatial and Temporal Scales” is similar in content to the first edition but broader in scope. A new chapter on biodiversity of southeastern forests (Robert Peet, Kyle Palmquist, and Samantha Tessel) explores the remarkably rich flora of the Carolinas, including the Blue Ridge Mountains, the Piedmont, and the Coastal Plain. New data are presented and synthesized, and the previously little-appreciated relationship between base-cation availability and species richness is elucidated and discussed. Of the remaining five chapters in this section, Robert Peet revised and updated another chapter on the North Carolina Piedmont (co-authored only by Norman Christensen and Frank Gilliam in the first edition), adding substantial data from his long-term plot studies. Similarly, Nicole Fenton was added to the group of authors focusing on the understory in boreal forests of Quebec (Louis De Grandpré et al.), which brought in new discussion of succession in Picea mariana-feathermoss assemblages as well as effects of forest clear-cuts on understory diversity. Of the remaining three chapters, the ones by Brian McCarthy on old-growth deciduous forests and Susan Beatty on habitat heterogeneity were not updated at all. This is unfortunate, as their chapters discussed long-term studies, and it would have been interesting to know how these studies had unfolded over the last decade.
The final part, on “Community Dynamics and the Role of Disturbance,” is the most rewarding. The first edition had but three chapters, whereas the second edition has nine. The six new chapters cover effects of deer (chapters by Donald Waller, and by Walter Carson, Alejandro Royo, and Chris Peterson); clear-cutting in the southern Appalachians (Julie Wyatt and Miles Silman; legacies of past agricultural practices (Kathryn Flinn); nitrogen deposition (Frank Gilliam); and climate change (Jesse Bellemare and David Moeller). Every one of these chapters presents new data, is well written, and provides many open questions for future research. This final part has also been reorganized. Mark Roberts and Frank Gilliam’s review of disturbance effects has been moved to the beginning of the group of chapters, followed by Lisa George and Fakhri Bazzaz’s chapter on environmental filters, and then James Luken’s chapter on invasions and nonnative species. Of these three original chapters, Roberts and Gilliam updated their references and added a new conceptual model of understory dynamics in response to disturbance; and Luken reinterpreted his material in light of the last decade’s explosion of ideas and data on non-native and invasive species (surprisingly, however, earthworms are not mentioned at all, here or anywhere else in the book). George, however, did not update her chapter at all; in this and a few other chapters, cross-references to other chapters unfortunately were not updated by the editors to reflect the new edition’s expanded scope and re-ordered material.
Overall, the second edition of The Herbaceous Layer is much more than a corrected and lightly updated version of the first edition. The new chapters bring into sharp focus the importance of disturbance, conservation, and protection of forests and forest understories in states ranging from recovering clear-cuts to old-growth stands. The literature reviews and integrated bibliography are incredibly thorough and provide a one-stop shop for students beginning studies of the forest understory, for experienced researchers in need of a refresher, and for all, a reminder of the importance, the value, and the aesthetic beauty of the herbaceous layer.
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