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Fb2 This Island Earth ePub

by Raymond F. Jones

Category: Earth Sciences
Subcategory: Science books
Author: Raymond F. Jones
ISBN: 0586210504
ISBN13: 978-0586210505
Language: English
Publisher: Grafton; New Ed edition (March 14, 1991)
Pages: 192
Fb2 eBook: 1450 kb
ePub eBook: 1717 kb
Digital formats: lit docx lrf txt

Raymond F. Jones was the author of countless science-fiction short stories published between about 1941 and 1978, in such magazines as Astounding Stories

Raymond F. Jones was the author of countless science-fiction short stories published between about 1941 and 1978, in such magazines as Astounding Stories. THIS ISLAND EARTH was originally published as three long short stories, or novellas, in the magazine THRILLING WONDER STORIES; Jones published them as the novel THIS ISLAND EARTH in 1952. Jones was very much a pulp fiction writer of his era, which pretty much means he wrote down for the pulp market, which had no pretensions to literary interest.

This Island Earth is a 1952 science fiction novel by American writer Raymond F. Jones. It was first published in Thrilling Wonder Stories magazine as a serialized set of three novelettes by Raymond F. Jones: "The Alien Machine" in the June. Jones: "The Alien Machine" in the June 1949 issue, "The Shroud of Secrecy" in the December 1949 issue, and "The Greater Conflict" in the February 1950 issue. These three stories were later combined into the novel entitled This Island Earth in 1952.

About Raymond F. Jones: Raymond Fisher Jones (November 15, 1915, Salt Lake City . Discover new books on Goodreads He is best known for his 1952 novel, This Island Earth, which was adapted into the 1955 film This Island Earth and for the short. Jones: Raymond Fisher Jones (November 15, 1915, Salt Lake City, Utah - January 24, 1994, Sandy, Salt Lake County, Utah) was an American. Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Raymond F. Jones's books. He is best known for his 1952 novel, This Island Earth, which was adapted into the 1955 film This Island Earth and for the short story "The Children's Room", which was adapted for television as Episode Two of the ABC network show Tales of Tomorrow, first aired on February 29, 1952. Jones' career was at its peak during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s.

Raymond F. Jones’s most popular book is This Island Earth (Forrest J Ackerman Presents). The Year When Stardust Fell by. Raymond F. The Alien by.

Raymond Fisher Jones (15 November 1915 – 24 January 1994) was an American science fiction author. He is best known for his 1952 novel This Island Earth, which was adapted into the eponymous 1955 film. Jones was born at Salt Lake City, Utah, and was a member of the church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from birth. He died at Sandy, Utah, in 1994

He is best known for his 1952 novel, This Island Earth, which was adapted into the eponymous 1955 film. 312. Published: 2007.

On the surface, James Ellerbee was a crackpot with an impossible invention: a crystal cube you could hold in your hand that allowed instant communication with anyone on Earth. He is best known for his 1952 novel, This Island Earth, which was adapted into the eponymous 1955 film. If historical precedent be wrong-what qualities, then, must man possess to successfully colonize new worlds?

In 1949 and 1950 a science fiction serial by Raymond F. Jones appeared in Thrilling Wonder Stories.

In 1949 and 1950 a science fiction serial by Raymond F. Within half a decade that serial would make history as the basis of the first science fiction movie about interstellar travel and interstellar war. The next Hollywood movie to venture to another solar system was Forbidden Planet, a wholly original construct of the prestige studio MGM.

Raymond Fisher Jones (November 15, 1915, Salt Lake City, Utah - January 24, 1994, Sandy, Utah) was an American science fiction author. He is best known for his 1952 novel, This Island Earth, which was. He is best known for his 1952 novel, This Island Earth, which wa. .adapted into the 1955 film This Island Earth. His stories were published mainly in magazines such as Thrilling Wonder Stories, Astounding Stories, and Galaxy. His short story Noise Level is known as one of his best works.

In 1949 and 1950 a science fiction serial by Raymond F. Jones appeared in Thrilling Wonder Stories. Within half a decade that serial would make history as the basis of the first science fiction movie about interstellar travel and interstellar war. The next Hollywood movie to venture to another solar system was Forbidden Planet, a wholly original construct of the prestige studio MGM. But solid, reliable Universal Studios was there first...long before Star Trek.

This Island Earth was really the first Star Wars. Colorful, spectacular, wildly imaginative, it lived up to everything its agent could possibly want, a man who was known as Mr. Science Fiction and who now brings back this classic novel: Forrest J Ackerman. A phrase he coined in another galaxy a long time ago say's it all: Gosh Wow! This story has it all.

The cover of this special edition features Jeff Morrow in the role of one of the most sympathetic aliens in 1950's science fiction film (the other is Michael Rennie in The Day the Earth Stood Still, also adapted from a literary source). In the novel he is Jorgasnovara, in the movie the less jaw Breaking Exeter. In both print and celluloid he comes to respect the Earth scientists essayed by Rex Reason and Faith Domergue.

This Island Earth is a book of heroes. The first half of the film closely follows the novel but then diverges from the intellectual challenges faced by Dr. Cal Meachem to more cinematic fare. Reading the novel now, one cannot help but marvel at how Jones' views everything from labor disputes to the predictability of computers influenced later movies and television, making This Island Earth, the novel, even more influential than-one would guess from ThisIsland Earth the movie.

Pulpless.Com is proud to bring back the printed word in hope that all who see the movie will want to read the book, and vice versa! Turn on your interocitors and prepare to receive transmission!

Comments to eBook This Island Earth
ME
Raymond F. Jones was the author of countless science-fiction short stories published between about 1941 and 1978, in such magazines as Astounding Stories. THIS ISLAND EARTH was originally published as three long short stories, or novellas, in the magazine THRILLING WONDER STORIES; Jones published them as the novel THIS ISLAND EARTH in 1952.

Jones was very much a pulp fiction writer of his era, which pretty much means he “wrote down” for the pulp market, which had no pretensions to literary interest. The characters of THIS ISLAND EARTH are briefly sketched, description is direct and unshaded, and information that doesn’t have a direct bearing on the plot (such as a marriage between the hero and heroine) are relegated to a line or two. It isn’t great writing; it isn’t even good writing; it is at most adequate writing—but the ideas were startling enough for the 1950s to become the basis of a state-of-the-art 1955 sci-fi movie classic.

If you come to the book from the movie, you should be aware that the two begin in the same general way but don’t continue along the same road. When engineer Cal Meacham orders condensers and instead receives “glass beads” that function better than any condensers he has ever seen, he is gradually drawn into ordering more and more parts until he is able to construct what the catalogue describes as an “interociter.” His successful construction of the piece results in a job offer from the manufacturer, but once Cal accepts the job—and flies to it in an unmanned aircraft—he quickly becomes aware that his employers are not what they seem. Are they … from outer space? Could be!

THIS ISLAND EARTH is firmly rooted in post-WWII-America, and is in some way indicative of Cold War paranoias, but more than this it references the War in the Pacific, where islands were used for airstrips and supported by natives who had no real concept of flight, much less the world war itself. It is a clever idea, and the novel’s notion of intergalactic warfare, with the earth akin to one of the Pacific islands, is powerful. But is THIS ISLAND EARTH worth reading from a modern standpoint?

Given the way it is written, the answer is “probably not”—but it depends on what why you’re reading it. As a fan of the movie? Or because you have interest in pulp fiction or mid-20th Century science fiction? Absolutely, and you’ll likely enjoy it quite a bit. But if you’re coming to the book with the notion that it will be in the same league as Asimov or Heinlein or such? I’d say you’d do better to leave it alone.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer
Zeueli
A famous Sci-Fi movie of the '50s was made, based somewhat on this book, with the same title. The book and the movie start off very similarly, but, diverge well into the plot. Put simply, this book is not the movie. That being said, this is a Sci-Fi story from the Golden Age of Sci-Fi, plot was everything at that time, pacing and action were drivers. As other reviewers have noted this is not one of those stories where characters are developed in detail. Most of the characters are one-dimensional, with just enough dynamic to keep them from being card board cut-outs. As stated, plot was everything in those days, Sc-Fi writers in the '50s wrote mostly for periodicals, plot and action were the thing, character development was only used to flesh out the story. Pacing was another feature of Sci-Fi from the '50s, action and plot were the thing, page turning pace was the norm.

Taken for what it is, this is a great read. If you are looking for in-depth character development or a reprise of scientific possibilities, this isn't the book for you. On the other hand, if you like a fast-paced, inventive story with action and a general theme you can readily understand, this book delivers.
Auridora
What would you do if you ordered condensers from your regular supplier (Continental) and instead received superior condensers from another supplier that you didn’t order from? Meet engineer Cal Meacham from Ryberg Instrument Corp. Cal tested the new parts and they were phenomenal. They came from a company named Electronic Service-Unit 16 with no return address or phone number. Cal told purchasing agent Joe Wilson to order a gross more. When the gross was shipped to Ryberg they were only billed 30 cents apiece! Joe tells Cal that Continental doesn’t know anything about the order. Once again, they came from Electronic Service-Unit 16, but this time the order came with a catalog that listed and showed parts that Cal and Joe never heard of. On top of that, the pages weren’t even paper. “Joe, this stuff isn’t even paper.” Cal’s fingers merely slipped away. “That’s as tough as sheet iron!” The catalog lists catherimine tubes among other strange parts. Joe arched his eyebrows. “Ever hear of a catherimine tube? One with an endiom complex of plus four, which guarantees it to be the best of its kind on the market?” Cal says, “What kind of gibberish is that?” Cal turned the pages until, “He came to a inner dividing cover at the centre of the catalogue. For the first time, the center cover announced, Electronic Service-Unit 16 offers a complete line of interocitor components. In the following pages you will find complete descriptions of components which reflect the most modern engineering advances know to interocitor engineers.” What’s a interocitor and who are these people that sent the catalogue? Welcome to the world of Raymond F. Jones, who wrote this 1952 sci-fi classic (later a 1955 movie).

On page eleven Cal finds out that a neighboring plant has also been receiving unknown parts...this time from Electronic Service-unit 8. That plant’s purchasing agent ordered special gears from a different company, but got two perfectly smooth wheels from Unit-8 instead. He said that, “He was about ready to hit the ceiling when he discovered that one wheel rolled against the other would drive it. So I mounted them on shafts and put a motor on one and a pony brake on the other. Believe it or not those things would transfer any horsepower I could use. And I had up to three hundred and fifty. There was perfect transfer without measurable slippage or backlash. The craziest thing you ever saw.” Cal decides to order all the parts necessary to build an interocitor. Almost two weeks go by. Then suddenly fourteen crates arrive. “They stood seven feet tall and were no smaller than four by five feet in cross section.” There are no instructions. Cal needs to use all his past knowledge of engineering and the pictures in the catalog to try to put this together. If he does succeed in putting it together, how does he turn it on? what does it do? Cal is stunned when Joe tells him that the bill for all those crates (4,896 parts) was only twenty-eight hundred dollars. On page twenty-five, after many trials and tribulations, Cal finishes assembling the interocitor. It’s some kind of communicator with a TV- like screen attached to it. He plays around with it and finally gets a fuzzy image on the screen. A masculine voice suddenly says, “Turn up the intensifier knob.” After Cal adjusted the knob, the image came in. Cal said, “Who are you? What have I built? The man (who has a high forehead and white hair) on the screen said, “We’d about given you up, but you’ve passed. And rather well, too.”

The strange man says, “You have passed the test!” Cal says, “What do you mean? I have made no application to work with your-your employers.” A faint trace of a smile crossed the man’s face. “No. No one does that. We pick our own applicants and test them, quite without their awareness that they are being tested. You are to be congratulated on your showing.” The man convinces Cal to come to work for them. Cal couldn’t think of any reason not to go. “There were few that he could muster up. None, actually. He was alone, without family or obligations. He had no particular professional ties to prevent him for leaving.” The man says on page twenty-eight, “Our plane will land on your airfield at six p.m. It will remain fifteen minutes. It will take off without you if you are not in it by that time. You will know it by its color. A black ship with a single horizontal orange stripe.” This is where I will stop my review so you can enjoy the meaty part of the story uninhibited. This sci-fi novel could have easily been read in one day. But then I wouldn’t have had this pleasurable feeling that I’ve had for the past three days. You have to savor this novel like a fine wine.
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