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Fb2 Postsingular ePub

by Rudy Rucker

Category: Science Fiction
Subcategory: Sci-fi
Author: Rudy Rucker
ISBN: 0765318725
ISBN13: 978-0765318725
Language: English
Publisher: Tor Books; Reprint edition (February 3, 2009)
Pages: 320
Fb2 eBook: 1486 kb
ePub eBook: 1599 kb
Digital formats: txt azw rtf mobi

Rudy Rucker's new novel Postsingular is pure Rucker: a dope-addled exploration of the way-out fringes of string theory and the quantum universe that distorts the possible into the most improbable contortions.

Rudy Rucker's new novel Postsingular is pure Rucker: a dope-addled exploration of the way-out fringes of string theory and the quantum universe that distorts the possible into the most improbable contortions. This is one of the most fun, strangest, most thought-provoking sf novels I've read.

A Tor Book Published by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC 175 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10010. com Tor® is a registered trademark of Tom Doherty Associates, LLC. This is a work of fiction

A Tor Book Published by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC 175 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10010. This is a work of fiction. All of the characters

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. It all begins next year in California. A maladjusted computer industry billionaire and a somewhat crazy US President initiate a radical transformation of the world through sentient nanotechnology; sort of the equivalent of biological artificial intelligence. At first they succeed.

Tom Doherty Associates, 3 февр. Rudy Rucker starts a reported trilogy with a book about nanotechnology remaking the world, and the consciousness of the world's inhabitants right along with it. In fact, the world is remade at least.

Postsingular is a 2007 science-fiction novel written by the American writer Rudy Rucker. It focuses upon a cast of San Franciscans and their relationship with emerging uses of nanotechnology. It was the first of his works to be licensed under a Creative Commons license and released to the public on the Internet. A sequel, Hylozoic, was released in 2009, but was not released under a free license.

Post-Singular serves as another proof of Rudy Rucker’s ability to expand the minds of his readers beyond conventional space and time.

It all begins next year in California. Post-Singular serves as another proof of Rudy Rucker’s ability to expand the minds of his readers beyond conventional space and time. Built from a short story on nanomachines that appeared independently (a plot heavily dependent on an autistic child and a mathematician who worked with paper and pencil because he didn’t trust computers and calculators), this novel considers possibilities of inter-dimensional reality that might have taken shape after the initial plot was foiled.

You can also read the full text online using our ereader. Postsingular takes on the question of what will happen after the Singularity-what will happen after computers become as smart as humans and nanotechnology takes on the power of magic? Book Excerpt. Jeff confides in me; I'm an older-brother figure.

The soft plastic scow flexed with the water’s gentle chop. Double-jointed mounds of Craigor’s art projects stood heaped beside his little workshop at the boat’s stern. Amidships, the glowing windows. of a long cabin illuminated fishing nets and a big glass tank of cuttlefish. In the bow, a group of Jil’s shoons chattered among themselves and called soft greetings. How- began Thuy, but now one of the cabin doors opened and here came Jil Zonder.

Читать бесплатно Postsingular Rudy Rucker. Unfortunately I'm too planktonic for fame. I transcend encapsulation.

It begins the day after next year in California. A maladjusted computer industry billionaire and a somewhat crazy US president initiate a radical transformation of the world through sentient nanotechnology; sort of the equivalent of biological artificial intelligence. At first they succeed, but their plans are reversed by Chu, an autistic boy. The next time it isn't so easy to stop them.

Most of the story takes place in our world after a previously unimaginable transformation. All things look the same, and all people feel the same―but they are different (they're able to read each others' minds, for starters). Travel to and from other nearby worlds in the quantum universe is possible. And our world is visited by giant humanoids from another quantum universe, some of whom mean to tidy up the mess we've made.

Or maybe just run things.

Comments to eBook Postsingular
Runemane
I picked this one up on a whim despite the mixed reviews, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Postsingular offered chapter upon chapter of Rucker's mind-blowing imagination, while always keeping the zaniness rooted by a scientific underpinning. If you enjoyed 'Frek and the Elixir' or 'Spaceland', then you'll enjoy this trip past the singularity.
Briciraz
A+
Nafyn
This book is a trippy, zippy neo-science fiction. Something that combines the campiness of old with the technology of new. I don't really like that sort of thing. It's like what Cory Doctorow writes and what Snow Crash evolved into. I don't like my science-fiction in my fantasy, especially when you start as one and migrate to the other.

The story is about a possible "singularity" (look it up). In this case, the singularity is all of us becoming computers, or basically the world becomes an Internet somehow. I don't really get it. It's half technobabble and half stifled dialogue. Meanwhile, an autistic boy finds a parallel reality that doesn't much like us by using the World Internet. This reality is populated by slow giants who like cuttlefish.

I don't get it. There's parts of it that seem researched enough to be a Crichton novel, and then junk like alternate reality giants with Japanese gardens. Then you bring in some fresh-faced teens, an autistic boy, and a big benevolent AI who wants to take over. Everything just seems mish-mashed with hip cyberpunk terms and illogical human behavior. But the most important thing is that the characters are no one you want to care about.

The characters seem blocky, and more concerned about everything else besides their own relationships. This is my big problem with a lot of science fiction, and why I don't read the generic stuff. The authors know technology, but not people. He uses addicts and affairs as a side story, when that's a profound trait that needs to be explored. And when I say side story I mean it's practically forced in there, as if there needed to be something to keep the women readers occupied. People have sex at the drop of a hat, have affair after affair with the affected looking the other way, and no thought for their children, who wander out of the house and get high on A.I. Everyone acts like a kid, especially the adults.

I don't know whether he's trying to be Neal Stephenson or Phllip K. Dick, but I can't think of any reason to read this book. The story is just cyberjunk with wooden characters and pithy motivations. Maybe that's the nature of the beast when we all turn into computers.
Sirara
I just recently started reading Rudy Rucker's work, starting with the Ware Tetralogy and then moving on to Postsingular. Postsingular keeps up the breakneck speed of inventiveness evident in the Ware Tetralogy, especially the sense of accelerating strangeness, both cosmological and human.

Rucker packs in as many ideas into one novel as five normal SF authors would. This daring, bravura writing style might disorient some readers, but if you enjoy this seemingly kitchen sink approach, then Rucker provides a treat that few authors can rival. And I say "seemingly kitchen sink" because if you read his writing notes (available on his site), you will see that there is reason and design behind his most outlandish concepts and events. At the same time, the cosmic scale events are always lightened by generous humor and a tone utterly lacking in pretentiousness.

I appreciated that Postsingular anchors its myriad action and ideas with a pair of fully realized protagonists. Thuy and Jayjay convincingly embody the angst, indecision, and rashness of young people trying to navigate a rapidly changing world populated by motley, dissipated elders. Mr. Rucker is no youngster, but it's clear that he remembers what it's like to be one.

No, this is not the most tightly plotted story around. Nor is it a deadly serious, hard SF novel that reads like a peer-reviewed physics paper. If that's the kind of SF you require, then this is not the novel you are looking for. I like serious hard SF as much as anyone, but I also love this kind of rip-roaring, no-holds barred, gonzo smorgasborg of ideas.

Postsingular is a wild, funny thrill ride that will have you turning the pages not simply to find out what happens to its characters but also to discover what mind-bending twist the fabric of reality will undergo next.
Granijurus
Rudy Rucker's bodacious ideas are easy to love, but it's harder to love the books. His level of creativity will amaze the adventurous reader, but his skills in distilling those ideas into a coherent plot still have some catching up to do. This book is overflowing with quirky forward thinking about the upcoming quantum singularity, in which every atom in the universe possesses computing power and humanity is freed from earthly isolation. And unlike many of his fellow extropian authors, Rucker makes his stories fun and engaging with brightly described settings, oddball adventures, and quirky characters. He also overloads his prose with wild terminology that might seem like made-up slang but are actually constructed neologisms that will mean something a few decades from now (such as "ubbaflop"). It's certainly fun to read this story of geeky villainy, street-kid heroism, and inter-dimensional shenanigans in the race to either save or ruin humanity in the face of the oncoming singularity. That is, after a rocky start that was apparently pieced together from multiple pre-existing short stories, with incredibly vast but under-explained thought experiments by Rucker appearing and disappearing haphazardly. The book eventually becomes more functional, notwithstanding some very inconsistent plotting. But the real problem is the poorly-written romantic relationships - which are so obviously not Rucker's forte. This novel highlights all of Rucker's weaknesses, sometimes to the point of embarrassment, but the strengths of his ideas and cosmos-sized compu-thinking still make for an adventurous read. [~doomsdayer520~]
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