» » The Cardinal's Blades

Fb2 The Cardinal's Blades ePub

by Pierre Pevel

Category: Fantasy
Subcategory: Sci-fi
Author: Pierre Pevel
ISBN: 0575084391
ISBN13: 978-0575084391
Language: English
Publisher: Gollancz; UK ed. edition (July 8, 2010)
Pages: 384
Fb2 eBook: 1335 kb
ePub eBook: 1577 kb
Digital formats: lrf azw txt lrf

Читать онлайн The Cardinal s Blades. Arnaud de Laincourt closed his book. The same prudent advice I gave to Neuvelle also applies to us, he said. Let us forget all of that.

Читать онлайн The Cardinal s Blades. The Cardinal s Blades. Before being received in the cardinal’s apartment visitors normally had to pass through five rooms throughout which guards were stationed on continuous watch, day and night.

The Cardinal s Blades. 1. Long and high-ceilinged, the room was lined with elegantly gilded and bound books which shone with a russet gleam in the half-light of the candle flames

The Cardinal s Blades. Long and high-ceilinged, the room was lined with elegantly gilded and bound books which shone with a russet gleam in the half-light of the candle flames. Outside, beyond the thick red velvet curtains, Paris slept beneath a starry sky and a deep tranquillity had settled on the dusky streets which penetrated even here, where the scratching of a quill barely troubled the silence.

Pierre Pevel est l’un des fleurons de la Fantasy française. Il a obtenu le Grand Prix de l’Imaginaire en 2002 et le prix Imaginales 2005. Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Pierre Pevel's books. Pierre Pevel’s Followers (129). More follower. ierre Pevel.

The Cardinal's Blades is part historical novel, part old-fashioned swashbuckling high-action adventure, and part classic fantasy. Pierre Pevel has woven some of the best-loved fantasy tropes - musketeer-style adventuring, daring swordsmen, political intrigue, non-stop action and dragons - into a stunning new fantasy series. Louis XIII reigns over France. and Cardinal Richelieu governs the country

3 Les Lames du Cardinal (The Cardinal's Blades). Pierre Pevel was born in 1968. Pierre Pevel's novels are written in a style approaching that of uchronia (or, alternative history), and in particular of fantasy uchronia.

3 Les Lames du Cardinal (The Cardinal's Blades). Haut-Royaume (A Tale from the High Kingdom). English Translations. He was a scriptwriter and author of role-playing games (RPG), before he began writing. He has written many fantasy novels under the pseudonym "Pierre Jacq", often signing his books under his real name. He is known for his trilogy, the Ombres de Wieldstadt, published en 2001, which in 2002 won him a Grand Prix de l'Imaginaire. Pierre Pevel lives in Nancy, France.

The cardinal's blades. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on September 13, 2013.

This is also true of the other fantastic draconic elements I just mentioned. For the most part, the dragonets, and wyverns are only there for color, a splash of fantasy paint on the historical bones of the book. The Cardinal's Blades' focus is directed on the historical sword-and-sandal elements and milieu. Characterization development, is another disappointment in this novel.

Pevel, Pierre, Translated By Clegg. Broad, at almost four metres across, and heavily used, it was a place of sad memories: it was here that Ravaillac had stabbed Henri IV when the royal coach was halted by the busy street traffic. this detail aside, Laincourt’s address was quite commonplace. He rented accommodation in a house similar to many others in Paris: tall and narrow, crammed in between its neighbours, with a small shop on the ground floor-a ribbon seller, as it happened

The Cardinal's Blades is part historical novel, part old-fashioned swashbuckling high-action adventure, and part classic fantasy. and Cardinal Richelieu governs the country. One of the most dangerous and most powerful men in Europe, Richelieu keeps a constant, sharp eye on the enemies of the Crown to avoid their assassination attempts, thwart their.

Paris, 1633. Louis XIII reigns over France and Cardinal Richelieu governs the country. Richelieu keeps a constant eye on the enemies of the Crown to avoid their assassination attempts, thwart their spies and avert their warmongering. But he's up against people who will stop at nothing to achieve their goals.
Comments to eBook The Cardinal's Blades
Rayli
A wonderfully imaginative romp through 17th century Paris. Loved the references to Dumas, but had a personality of its own. The use of dragons is great and gives just the right fantasy touch.
Kelenn
I was on the fence whether this was a 3-star (aka okay but nothing special, acceptable beach/plane reading) or a 2-star (would not recommend) book. Ultimately, I realised that going back to the book after a break always felt more like a chore than a joy and what should have been an action-packed joyride ended up taking me a fair amount of time to actually finish.

I think the single biggest flaw in the book is simply that it takes forever to get going. Like, maybe 70% of the book before the actual plot starts? So what is actually happening in the 200 or so pages up to that point? All of the Blades get introduced and some of those introductions take a very, very long time to get to the point. (Saint-Luc's is especially bad because it is so pointless and dozens of pages are spent on his adventure.) A full 50% of the book passes before the initial group of Blades get back together and meet at their HQ. It is a curious choice for a book that should have been packed of swashbuckling adventure. Virtually all of this 50% could have been either cut or condensed to a dozen pages.

You could forgive an author for this languid pace of plotting if it meant we were getting deep character portraits or witty dialog between the characters. But....you don't really get that. Each of the Blades is given a thumbnail sketch (and in the case of Ballardieu and the, uh, Spaniard whose name is so forgettable I can't recall his name) and never really progresses from that.

There are a few other aggravations along the way. The author has the bad habit of ending most chapters on unnecessary cliffhangers. Things like (not an exact quote) "Saint-Luc opened the safe to find a bundle of letters. He opened the first one and began reading...." (And then you have to wait a few chapters to find out what the mysterious letters contain. It happens so often and so consistently that it simply became annoying.

The actual plot is underwhelming. The progress of the plot is 100% dependent on coincidences -- the Good Guys and the Bad Guys just happen to be in the same place at the same time. Leading to a chase or a kidnapping or whatever is required to deliver the next necessary bit of information to the Good Guys. Finally, it isn't until (literally) the last dozen pages that the Good Guys even know that there is a Bad Guy's Plan ... and the plan is destroyed literally minutes after being uncovered.

As a final annoyance -- the whole "the Cardinal disbanded the Blades" angle doesn't make much sense to me considering he continued to employ Saint-Luc.
Sardleem
This book takes place during the reign of Louis XIII of France with Cardinal Richelieu presiding over the nation. The cardinal's Blades are an elite group task ed with a secret mission but betrayal and double-crossing prevail.

The fantasy element involves the existence of dragons and dragonnets but they are mainly incidental here. /so it's more of an historical adventure story, well-told and exciting enough, a bit reminiscent of the work of Alexandre Dumas and Sir Walter Scott.

With many handsome men and beautiful women, the characters are quite well-developed and I recommend this novel to those who enjoy historical fiction with a touch of fantasy.
Thetath
The ring of swords. The clash of steel. Action. Adventure. Swashbuckling. Romance.
Even in this modern age, there is a irresistible romance to swordplay, musketeers and the derring-do of a long lost age. Captured by Alexandre Dumas in his 19th century novels, the world of the musketeers has extended into many movie adaptations (and yet more to come). As a seminal influence, the Three Musketeers are one of the principal inspirations for both the sword and sorcery and sword and sandal genres in fantasy and historical fiction.

Similarly, dragons are an extremely popular sub-genre in fantasy today. While dragons have been around in fantasy fiction since the time of Smaug, and the transformed Eustace, and McCaffrey's Pern are replete with them, in the last few years dragons have commonly cropped up both in modern day tales as well as the alternate Napoleonic War novels of Naomi Novik.
The Cardinal's Blades, the English language debut of French author Pierre Pavel, might be thought of as the marriage of these two streams of culture. Grounded in an alternate-history 17th century France, the Cardinal's Blades is the story of the titular characters, a disgraced secret force of Cardinal Richelieu brought back into service for one more mission against France's major adversary--Spain and its Court of Dragons, and more to the point, its secret society trying to operate in France, the Black Claw.

In Pavel's alternate world, while history has mostly gone on as it has in our world (I did catch at least one major change that makes this alternate history, not just our-history-with-dragons), there are dragons of all sizes in society. Dragonets are pets for the rich and powerful (such as the good Cardinal himself). Wyverns, in perhaps a nod to Novik, are used by aviators as couriers. There are half-dragons (matings between transformed dragons and humans) and brutish dracs (humanoid dragon offspring) as well. Actual dragons are rare and devoted to their own inscrutable purposes. For the most part, they are offstage, manipulating the action rather than, say, taking to the skies and raking Paris with gouts of fire.
This is also true of the other fantastic draconic elements I just mentioned. For the most part, the dragonets, and wyverns are only there for color, a splash of fantasy paint on the historical bones of the book. The Cardinal's Blades' focus is directed on the historical sword-and-sandal elements and milieu.

Characterization development, is another disappointment in this novel. Pavel seems to have reserved most of his characterization for the captain of the Cardinal's Blades, La Fargue, and has fallen to stereotypes and somewhat thinner character development for the rest of the cast . The Womanizing rogue, the Serious one, the Woman in a man's world. Once these traits are set, they do not seem to change or grow.

On the bright side, every one of the Cardinal's Blades does get individual attention and screen time, especially when La Fargue gets the band back together, and when the members head out in a Diaspora to accomplish various pieces of the problem of opposing the Black Claw and its plans. The villains are somewhat more well drawn, and as in the case in many of these books, are as interesting as the characters.

A fair criticism of this review might ask--given my criticisms thus far, well what DOES work in this book?
Well, the Historical perspective. As I have said earlier, this is an alternate history. I am not so familiar with French history to be aware of other divergences, but there is one. It is not at all clear that the fantasy elements are responsible for the point of divergence, and it does seem to be again, mostly for color. The writing does effectively convey the backdrop of 17th century France, perhaps more so because I kept mentally filling in memories of various Musketeers movies. What I mean by this is, nothing in the book jarred with those visions, helping to establish an effective mise-en-scene for the events of the novel.

The swashbuckling action and adventure, too, is one of the best reasons to read this book. Action and adventure this novel has in plenty and Pavel seems to be at his best and most effective as a writer when things get interesting. To the point, there are very effective "set-piece" encounters and battles that are exciting, well written, and helped draw me through the book. For all of the weaknesses mentioned above, Pavel knows how to write effective, engaging and exciting encounters between the protagonists and their foes.

Another thing that works is the complexity of the plot. It's not too convoluted, but things are not quite as they seem, and the motivations of the bigger players on the board are suitably complex and multisided. There is a lot going on in Pavel's world, much more than meets the eye, and there plenty of material here that future volumes in this world could explore.

So, while I don't think that Pavel's The Cardinal's Blades is an heir to, say, Brust's The Phoenix Guards and Five Hundred Years Later, I think it is good enough that I would read a sequel, especially given the twist ending that begs for explanation in a future volume. I hope that forthcoming books will keep Pavel's strengths and shore up some of the weaknesses and would love to see what he does, given an opportunity to grow into this universe.
Related to The Cardinal's Blades
The Three Musketeers (Wordsworth Classics) eBook
Fb2 The Three Musketeers (Wordsworth Classics) ePub
The Life of John Cardinal McCloskey: First Prince of the Church in America: 1880-1885 eBook
Fb2 The Life of John Cardinal McCloskey: First Prince of the Church in America: 1880-1885 ePub
Cardenal Richelieu (Spanish Edition) eBook
Fb2 Cardenal Richelieu (Spanish Edition) ePub
Bateaux et épaves du Richelieu (French Edition) eBook
Fb2 Bateaux et épaves du Richelieu (French Edition) ePub
The Making of a Cardinal eBook
Fb2 The Making of a Cardinal ePub
Father Tom: Portrait of Cardinal Tomas O'Fiaich eBook
Fb2 Father Tom: Portrait of Cardinal Tomas O'Fiaich ePub
Cardinal Hume: A Spiritual Companion eBook
Fb2 Cardinal Hume: A Spiritual Companion ePub
The architecture of Douglas Cardinal eBook
Fb2 The architecture of Douglas Cardinal ePub
The Four Cardinal Virtues eBook
Fb2 The Four Cardinal Virtues ePub