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Fb2 Is There a God? ePub

by Richard Swinburne

Category: Religious Studies
Subcategory: Religious books
Author: Richard Swinburne
ISBN: 0198235445
ISBN13: 978-0198235446
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; First Printing edition (April 11, 1996)
Pages: 160
Fb2 eBook: 1932 kb
ePub eBook: 1426 kb
Digital formats: txt docx mobi lrf

Is There a God? book.

Is There a God? book. Richard Swinburne, one of the most distinguished philosophers of religion today, argues that on the contrary, science provides good grounds for belief in God. Why is there a universe at all? Why is there any life on Earth? How is it that discoverable scientific laws operate in the universe? Swinburne uses these methods of scientific reasoning to argue that the best answers to these questions are given by the existence of God. The picture of the universe that science gives us is completed by God.

Richard Swinburne believes that science can actually lead us back to Go.

Richard Swinburne believes that science can actually lead us back to God. A belief in God actually explains everything and answers our deepest questions about life. On the issue of morality Swinburne wrote Moral truths are clearly moral truths, whether or not there is a God: It is surely wrong to torture children for fun whether or not there is a God I must disagree with him on this. If there is no God and man is merely an evolved animal, then man could have evolved to think it was good in some cases to torture children for fun and there wouldn't be any reason that it was wrong if culture accepted it.

Richard Granville Swinburne (/ˈswɪnbɜːrn/; born 26 December 1934) is a British philosopher. He is an Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford. Over the last 50 years Swinburne has been an influential proponent of philosophical arguments for the existence of God. His philosophical contributions are primarily in the philosophy of religion and philosophy of science

Richard Swinburne is one of the world's foremost Christian philosophers and in "The Resurrection of God Incarnate" he seeks to answer the question of. .

Richard Swinburne is one of the world's foremost Christian philosophers and in "The Resurrection of God Incarnate" he seeks to answer the question of the resurrection of Jesus from the perspective of probability. That's what is said, but the huge majority of the book reads as history. This is not a problem of course, but it does seem to affect the whole of the argument. Swinburne makes the case that if there is a God, He will want to reveal to us the way that we are to live and will do so to fulfill His obligations to us. Now at this point, I do have a problem as I don't think God has any obligations to us until He makes a promise and even then, the obligation is more to His own nature.

Swinburne Richard (EN)

Swinburne Richard (EN). and witheach new discovery or development, it seems that we are closer to a complete understanding of how things are.

Is There a God? offers a powerful response to modern doubts about the existence of God. It may seem today that the answers to all fundamental questions lie in the province of science, and that the scientific advances of the twentieth century leave little room for God.

Handy books on god. Richard Swinburne, Is There a God? (Revised. paperback e. Oxford: OUP, 2010. pp. 144. ISBN: 978-0-19-958043-9). Richard Swinburne, Was Jesus God? (Paperback.

Is There A God - Richard Swinburne Prof

Is There A God - Richard Swinburne Prof.

In Is There a God? Swinburne presents a powerful and approachable case for the existence of Go.

In Is There a God? Swinburne presents a powerful and approachable case for the existence of God. Using the methods of scientific reasoning, Swinburne rigorously argues that science, far from replacing God, provides good grounds for belief in Go. The public thinking about such issues has been influenced by several books by distinguished scientists, among them Richard Dawkins The Blind Watchmaker (1986) and Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time (1988). With the scientific theories advocated in these books I have relatively little quarrel, and can only admire Hawking's depth of physical intuition and Dawkins's clarity of exposition.

The author is one of the most influential figures in modern religious thought.

Is There a God? offers a powerful response to modern doubts about the existence of God. It may seem today that the answers to all fundamental questions lie in the province of science, and that the scientific advances of the twentieth century leave little room for God. Cosmologists have rolled back their theories to the moment of the Big Bang; the discovery of DNA reveals the key to life; the theory of evolution explains the development of life--and with each new discovery or development, it seems that we are closer to a complete understanding of how things are. For many people, this gives strength to the belief that God is not needed to explain the universe; that religious belief is not based on reason; and that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause. Richard Swinburne, one of the most distinguished philosophers of religion today, argues that on the contrary, science provides good grounds for belief in God. Why is there a universe at all? Why is there any life on Earth? How is it that discoverable scientific laws operate in the universe? Swinburne uses these methods of scientific reasoning to argue that the best answers to these questions are given by the existence of God. The picture of the universe that science gives us is completed by God. Powerful, modern, and accessible, Is There a God? is must reading for anyone interested in an intelligent and approachable defence of the existence of God.
Comments to eBook Is There a God?
Delan
Many say that some of our most important questions still can't be answered by science. Richard Swinburne believes that science can actually lead us back to God. A belief in God actually explains everything and answers our deepest questions about life. Richard Swinburne takes on a difficult topic and fortunately he is a deep philosophical thinker who is very logical and argues his position very well, while also being open to other possibilities.

If you have read The Coherence of Theism, this book has a summary of that book's content with new ideas developed over the years. What did surprise me about Swinburne in this book is that he actually believes in God and Evolution. I'd think you've have to pick between the biblical record and the scientific angle. So if you don't believe in evolution, just ignore pages 52-57 and you will still benefit from the rest of the book.

I did disagree a few times due to my own experience with God personally. I disagree that God does not know what we will do tomorrow for really if God is outside time, he already knows what has happened. And sometimes things happen to me in a way that I realize God knew what I'd be reading years in advance. I think in some ways if you have given your life over to God and have given him control, he knows exactly what is going to happen to you, since he has planned it. God also knew from the beginning of history that Jesus would die on the cross and he gave the information to biblical authors who predicted the future. Jesus fulfilled all those prophecies which to me means God not only knew what would happen, he made it all happen. I know, it is complicated.

Also, Swinburne's idea that God does not have a body seems to have been disproven. He is still everywhere (omnipresent) but he also appears in heaven on a throne in a body. My mother also believes God does not have a body, so maybe Swinburne and my mother are unaware of the recent evidence of people going to heaven and meeting God face to face. People in Bible days also saw God in a body, although it was mostly Jesus who appeared. But think of Moses, he saw the back of God and was radiant because of it.

I will say that the information in this book did make my belief in God even stronger because it is rational and logical. I found this book refreshingly clear and convincing. I feel that Swinburne has a great understanding of science AND spirituality, which is rare to some extent. I look forward to reading other books by this author and agreeing or disagreeing with his ideas. At least he makes me think more deeply about reality.

~The Rebecca Review
Anayalore
This book by Swinburne is definitely easy reading, I do kind of wonder the attempt to summarize and make things really simple resulted in a certain parts striking the readership as a bit contrived, questionable and unbelievable. I dunno, I would need to read his more academic works to compare. I did like the book overall and occasionally I was excited to read a distinction or some point made that I never heard anyone else make, or that I myself had some to from personal reflections.

I appreciate that Swinburne recognized the absurdity of maintaining that God is frozen in some static “Timeless” state where everything is an every present NOW. Swinburne acknowledges that God cannot do what is logically impossible and the future which doesn't exist isn't there to know, people who insist that God must know what isn't there to know, are like those who insist that God must be able to make a rock heavy then he can lift and make himself both exist and not exist at the same time. God knowing all there is to know, means all future events that are certainties in His mind, are the things He predetermines to do and all other future events which he doesn't predetermine, He knows them for what they are—possibilities.

On the issue of morality Swinburne wrote “Moral truths are clearly moral truths, whether or not there is a God: It is surely wrong to torture children for fun whether or not there is a God”
I must disagree with him on this. If there is no God and man is merely an evolved animal, then man could have evolved to think it was good in some cases to torture children for fun and there wouldn't be any reason that it was wrong if culture accepted it. We see things happening in the animal kingdom that causes us to gasp with horror, but we wouldn't say these animals that rape, eat their young, kill for entertainment are evil, rather they just behaving how blind and pitiless evolution determined them to behave, so are humans morally superior because they evolved differently? If so by whose standard? So sure, what if human “animals” evolved a sense of “I'll scratch your back if you scratch mine” and this really is the basis for reciprocal altruism, they could have just as well evolved a different sense that would have also had survival benefits. Even if we evolved certain “moral” prejudices, and are therefore, deluded into sticking the oughts and ought nots on our own subjective prejudices, doesn't mean there is any such thing as moral truths. With no God, there simply cannot be any absolute moral Oughts or Ought Nots, the moral sense is an accident of evolution and it is forever in flux and shaped by the ever changing culture. I think it is more reasonable to say the basis of morality is the the very goodness of God, the basis of duty is the commands that flow from the One who is Love.

Swinburne made some interesting points. He mentioned “God cannot create the best of all possible worlds, for there can be no such world—any would can be improved by adding more persons to it, and no doubt in plenty of other ways as well. So what does God's perfect goodness amount to? Not that he does all possible good acts—that is no logically possible. Presumably that he fulfills his obligations, does no bad acts, and preforms very many good acts.”

I liked Swinburne's chapter on the two different kinds of Explanation, which was the reason why I bought and read the book. He writes “When dynamite causes a particular explosion, it does do because it has, among its properties, the power to do so and the liability to exercise that power under certain conditions—when it is ignites at a certain temperature and pressure. It has to cause the explosion under those conditions; it has no option, and there is nothing purposive about it doing so. But the dynamite was ignited because, say, a terrorist causes the ignition, because he had the power to do so, the belief that doing so would cause an explosion. He chose to cause the ignition; he could have done otherwise. Here we have two kinds of explanation. The first, in terms of powers and liabilities, is inanimate explanation. The second, in terms of powers, beliefs, and purposes, is intentions, or—as I shall call it in the future—personal explanation.”

Atheist believing there is no God, must believe that humans late in the history of the universe, due to unexplained natural laws, acting on inanimate matter that popped out of nothingness, though unguided and meaningless, accidentally evolved consciousness, mind, reason and the powers of acting and shaping the natural world (that is if they don't claim freewill and consciousness is an illusion as some do). This means they are forced to think that outside of humanity, there is only inanimate explanation. But if we suppose there is a God, we are then free to acknowledge both inanimate and personal explanations and can make much more sense of the universe, why there is something rather than nothing and the fine tuning of the cosmos, the mathematical and logical aspects of it, the information, complexity, beauty and rationality, etc...
Swinburne is a theistic evolutionist and I am not, but I did like this point he made “Darwin showed that the universe is a machine for making animals and humans. But it is misleading to gloss that correct point in the way that Richard Dawkins does: 'our own existence once presented the greatest of all mysteries, but... it is a mystery no longer... Darwin and Wallace solved it' )The Blind Watchmaker, p.xiii). It is misleading because it ignores the interesting question of whether the existence and operation of that machine, the factors which Darwin (and Wallace) cited to explain 'our existence', themselves have a further explanation. I have argued that the principles of rational inquiry suggest that they do. Darwin gave a correct explanation of the existence of animals and humans; but not, I think, an ultimate one. The watch may have been made with the aid of some blind screwdrivers (or even a blind watchmaking machine), but they were guided by a watchmaker with some very clear sight”

On the problem on evil, Swinburne wrote “in order to have a choice between good and evil, agents need already a certain depravity, in the sense of a system of desires for that they correctly believe to be evil... Depravity is itself an evil which is necessary condition of greater good. It makes possible a choice made seriously and deliberately, because made in the face of genuine alternative. I stress that, according to the free-will defense, it is a natural possibility of moral evil which is the necessary condition of the great good, not the actual evil itself.”

I could see how one could form this conclusion from the story of Adam and Eve. God put a tree in the garden and said don't eat from it. He could have made the fruit smell like poop and look like rotting meat with maggots crawling in it. But instead, we see Eve saw the fruit was desirable and she also wanted the wisdom it promised. So not only was there the possibility, but the evil option was compelling, there was an inner desire for it. But does this mean that Adam and Eve are to be considered to already be depraved?

For there to be truly a choice, must evil be as or more attractive than the good? If I offer my kids Brussels spouts or ice-cream, I am giving them a choice, but I know they'll likely go with the ice-cream. Why couldn't God have made the good like ice-cream and the bad like Brussels spouts? How does this truly remove choice?

Some of Swinburne's thoughts on Miracles and Religious Experiences was good. But this review is a bit lengthy, so I'll wrapped up.
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