» » Theology in the Age of Scientific Reasoning (Cornell Studies in the Philosophy of Religion)

Fb2 Theology in the Age of Scientific Reasoning (Cornell Studies in the Philosophy of Religion) ePub

by Nancey Murphy

Category: Other Religions Practices and Sacred Texts
Subcategory: Religious books
Author: Nancey Murphy
ISBN: 0801424003
ISBN13: 978-0801424007
Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press; First Edition edition (April 2, 1990)
Pages: 232
Fb2 eBook: 1395 kb
ePub eBook: 1704 kb
Digital formats: mobi lrf lit doc

In this timely and provocative book, Nancey Murphy sets out to dispel skepticism regarding Christian belief.

In this timely and provocative book, Nancey Murphy sets out to dispel skepticism regarding Christian belief. She argues for the rationality of Christian belief by showing that theological reasoning is similar to scientific reasoning as described by contemporary philosophy of science.

Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1990. Acc In this timely and provocative book, Nancey Murphy sets out to dispel skepticism regarding Christian belief.

Similar books and articles. Theology in the Age of Scientific Reasoning, by Nancey Murphy. God Without the Supernatural. A Defense of Scientific Theism, Cornell Studies in Philosophy of Religion. Ithaca, Cornell University Press, 1996. Pp. 256. £3. 0 Cloth.

Nancey Murphy (born 12 June 1951) is an American philosopher and theologian who is Professor of Christian . Her first book, Theology in the Age of Scientific Reasoning (Cornell, 1990) won the American Academy of Religion award for excellence.

Nancey Murphy (born 12 June 1951) is an American philosopher and theologian who is Professor of Christian Philosophy at Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA. She received the . from Creighton University (philosophy and psychology) in 1973, the P. from University of California, Berkeley (philosophy of science) in 1980, and the T. Contents.

Inquiring after God by Means of Scientific Study," in Ellen Charry, e. Inquiring after God, Blackwell.

Theology in the Age of Scientific Reasoning, Cornell University Press. The Role of Philosophy in the Science/Religion Dialogue," and "Supervenience" in H. A. Campbell and H. Looy, ed. A Science and Religion Primer, Baker. with J. Schloss) "Biology and Religion," in M. Ruse, e. Oxford Handbook of Biology, Oxford University Press. Inquiring after God by Means of Scientific Study," in Ellen Charry, e. Science and Society," in . McClendon, Witness: Systematic Theology, Volume III, Abingdon.

Series: Cornell Studies in the Philosophy of Religion. 3 Probable Reasoning Come of Age-Philosophy of Science. Published by: Cornell University Press. Only in this generation has a theory of scientific reasoning appeared that is sophisticated enough to make a meaningful assessment of theology’s scientific status.

Cornell University Press.

In this timely and provocative book, Nancey Murphy sets out to dispel skepticism regarding Christian belief In this timely and provocative book, Nancey Murphy sets out to dispel skepticism regarding Christian belief. Cornell University Press.

Most disagreements about the proper place of philosophy in the theology-science dialogue stem from disagreements about the nature of philosophy itself.

In this timely and provocative book, Nancey Murphy sets out to dispel skepticism regarding Christian belief. She argues for the rationality of Christian belief by showing that theological reasoning is similar to scientific reasoning as described by contemporary philosophy of science.

Murphy draws on new historicist accounts of science, particularly that of lmre Lakatos. According to Lakatos, scientists work within a "research program" consisting of a fixed core theory and a series of changing auxiliary hypotheses that allow for prediction and explanation of novel facts: Murphy argues that strikingly similar patterns of reasoning can be used to justify theological assertions. She provides an original characterization of theological data and explores the consequences for theology and philosophy of religion of adopting such an approach.

Comments to eBook Theology in the Age of Scientific Reasoning (Cornell Studies in the Philosophy of Religion)
Nuadazius
This book is for professional philosophers, which is a shame because its topic, the existence of God, is obviously one that interests many people. However, because of the occurrence in it of many technical terms (such as "Bayesian" and "side constraints") that receive no or very little explanation, this book would have to double in length in order to be accessible to the general public. I took a star off of its rating because of this.
Most of the argumentation in this book is directed at the belief of many atheists that the universe is self-explanatory. Forrest argues that the best explanation for many features of our universe (for example, that it is life-friendly and that consciousness exists in it) is that there is a personal God. I had only some minor quibbles about this section of the book.
The last chapter of the book is devoted to arguing that the existence of evil is consistent with the existence of God, and his argument breaks down in this chapter, for which I took off another star. He claims that God's doing nothing about evil is justified if we are eventually given compensation for this (the compensation being eternal bliss) and if it would be irrational to reject this compensation.
However, imagine that you wake up one morning in a hospital bed, minus a kidney. During the night, it seems, the authorities trundled you off to the hospital and took out your kidney for the sake of someone else who desperately needed it. To compensate you for this outrage, you will be awarded a billion dollars.
Maybe you would agree that this was adequate compensation; then again, maybe you wouldn't. But whether you agreed or disagreed, and whether it is rational to agree or irrational to agree, the fact remains that what the authorities did to you was morally wrong. The compensation given to you, even if you agree to it (or even if it would be irrational for you not to agree to it), at best only excuses those who did this. It in no way justifies them. If it did justify them, then this sort of thing would be allowed, which it isn't. Accordingly, Forrest's attempt to explain why God does nothing about evil doesn't work.
Lop off the last chapter and make the rest of the book intelligible to the general public, and this would be a much more enjoyable book.
Windbearer
An impressive achievement and an interesting read!
Related to Theology in the Age of Scientific Reasoning (Cornell Studies in the Philosophy of Religion)
Whatever Happened to the Soul? Scientific and Theological Portraits of Human Nature eBook
Fb2 Whatever Happened to the Soul?  Scientific and Theological Portraits of Human Nature ePub
American Theological Inquiry, Volume Two, Issue One: A Biannual Journal of Theology, Culture, and History eBook
Fb2 American Theological Inquiry, Volume Two, Issue One: A Biannual Journal of Theology, Culture, and History ePub
Abductive Reasoning and Learning (Handbook of Defeasible Reasoning and Uncertainty Management Systems) eBook
Fb2 Abductive Reasoning and Learning (Handbook of Defeasible Reasoning and Uncertainty Management Systems) ePub
The Critique of Theological Reason eBook
Fb2 The Critique of Theological Reason ePub
Philosophy of Science (Fundamentals of Philosophy) eBook
Fb2 Philosophy of Science (Fundamentals of Philosophy) ePub
Nietzsche and Theology (Philosophy and Theology) eBook
Fb2 Nietzsche and Theology (Philosophy and Theology) ePub
Reasoning and the Explanation of Action eBook
Fb2 Reasoning and the Explanation of Action ePub
Christian Humanism: International Perspectives (American University Studies. Series VII. Theology and Religion) eBook
Fb2 Christian Humanism: International Perspectives (American University Studies. Series VII. Theology and Religion) ePub
Scientific Theology: Theory (v. 3) eBook
Fb2 Scientific Theology: Theory (v. 3) ePub