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Fb2 Two Shores of Zen: An American Monk's Japan ePub

by Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler

Category: Buddhism
Subcategory: Religious books
Author: Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler
ISBN: 055716821X
ISBN13: 978-0557168217
Language: English
Publisher: lulu.com (January 9, 2010)
Pages: 194
Fb2 eBook: 1828 kb
ePub eBook: 1595 kb
Digital formats: azw docx rtf lit

Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler is a Soto Zen Buddhist priest in the lineage of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi. Two Shores of Zen: An American Monk's Japan by Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler Publisher: lulu. com (2010), 194 pages PDF: Excerpts.

Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler is a Soto Zen Buddhist priest in the lineage of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi. He lives and teaches at Green Gulch Farm Zen Center, co-teaches at the Buddhadharma Sangha of San Quentin State Prison, and is working towards a graduate degree in Buddhist Studies at UC Berkeley. Ordained a priest in 2002 and serving as shuso in 2008, he lived and worked full-time in temples and monasteries in the . and Japan from the age of twenty, in 1996, to the age of thirty-five.

Two Shores of Zen weaves together scenes from Japanese and American Zen to offer a timely, compelling contribution to the ongoing conversation about Western Buddhism’s stark departures from Asian traditions.

Two Shores of Zen weaves together scenes from Japanese and American Zen to offer a timely, compelling contribution to the ongoing conversation about Western Buddhism’s stark departures from Asian traditions More fallen? ww. horesOfZen.

Two Shores of Zen book. When a young American Buddhist monk can no longer bear the pop-psychology, sexual intrigue, and free-flowing peanut butter that he insists pollute his spiritual community, he sets out for Japan on an archetypal journey to find True Zen.

Two Shores of Zen weaves together scenes from Japanese and American Zen to offer a timely, compelling contribution to the ongoing conversation about Western Buddhism's stark departures from Asian traditions. How far has Western Buddhism come from its roots, or indeed how far has it fallen? ww.

by Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler. Arriving at an austere Japanese monastery and meeting a fierce old Zen Master, he feels confirmed in his suspicion that the Western Buddhist approach is a spineless imitation of authentic spiritual effort.

San Francisco Zen Center. Berkeley, California. California Institute of Integral Studies. Class of 2010 · San Francisco, California. Deep Springs College.

Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler is a Soto Zen Buddhist priest and teacher in the lineage of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi . He is the author of the book Two Shores of Zen about his experiences in 2002-2004 as an American-trained monk practicing in Japanese Zen monasteries

Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler is a Soto Zen Buddhist priest and teacher in the lineage of Shunryu Suzuki Roshi, with Dharma Transmission from Sojun Mel Weitsman. He lives and teaches at Green Gulch Farm Zen Center, is the head teacher of the Buddhadharma Sangha of San Quentin State Prison, and is mentor and preceptor to the Montaña de Silencio Sangha in Medellín, Colombia. He is the author of the book Two Shores of Zen about his experiences in 2002-2004 as an American-trained monk practicing in Japanese Zen monasteries. Other writing of his has appeared in Buddhadharma, Lions’ Roar, and elsewhere. Along with his brother, Rev.

I’ve been reading Two Shores of Zen: An American Monk’s Japan, by Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler

I’ve been reading Two Shores of Zen: An American Monk’s Japan, by Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler.

When a young American Buddhist monk can no longer bear the pop-psychology, sexual intrigue, and free-flowing peanut butter that he insists pollute his spiritual community, he sets out for Japan on an archetypal journey to find "True Zen." Arriving at an austere Japanese monastery and meeting a fierce old Zen Master, he feels confirmed in his suspicion that the Western Buddhist approach is a spineless imitation of authentic spiritual effort. However, over the course of a year and a half of bitter initiations, relentless meditation and labor, intense cold, brutal discipline, insanity, overwhelming lust, and false breakthroughs, he grows disenchanted with the Asian model as well.Two Shores of Zen weaves together scenes from Japanese and American Zen to offer a timely, compelling contribution to the ongoing conversation about Western Buddhism's stark departures from Asian traditions. How far has Western Buddhism come from its roots, or indeed how far has it fallen? www.ShoresOfZen.com
Comments to eBook Two Shores of Zen: An American Monk's Japan
Adaly
Jiryu Mark is a regular guy -- insofar as Zen monks can be regular guys -- who spent time in a Japanese monastery and has interesting, revealing tales to tell. I think my favorite part, though, was at the end when he gives his thoughts on the state of Zen in the West today. Beautifully written, powerfully persuasive.
Water
Great little book that explore the cultural differences of our Western values VS the Japanese through Zen Buddhism, Rutschman the author honestly reflects on those differences, although in my opinion if the author mentions the decay of monasticism in Japan, way back when monks were "forced" to marry by official decree, and cries the lack of understanding of America, with relation to monasticism, he makes no mention of our own Western Christian decaying monastic traditions, that up to this day exist, and monks do not marry. The problem in my opinion, it is not the decay of monasticism, but it's total obsolescence in our contemporary world, and therefore the limited success of Zen Buddhism in America and the world in general, when it is trap in the robes of monasticism, lax, bland, and corporate like in America, or fanatically militaristic, and tough, but decayed and reduced to form like in Japan. Monasticism is a death fish floating belly up on the water, Buddhist, or Christian! Muslims never accepted monasticism, and saw it for what it is, an idealistic practice, perhaps, but unnatural, and not necessary. The author very young at the time, like many others felled in to the romantic trap of Japan, just to wake up to it's cultural exceptionalism reality.

I do not share the idea of the need of an unbroken lineage of transmission, neither the weak ontological premise of reincarnation, the ego, an illusion (of no real substance) can somehow reincarnate?

Enlightenment it is a constant since it is our true nature, therefore there is no need for an unbroken chain of transmitting his true essence, transmitting the Buddhist Dharma perhaps, but in every age individuals should be capable of realizing their true enlightened nature, so no need of an unbroken chain, a Buddha, or a Christ is within every numberless sentient being.
Of course a practice, effort, mindfulness, and living a full life of experiences it is necessary, to discover this nature.
Therefore the vows:
Sentient beings are numberless,
I vow to free them.
Delusions are inexhaustible,
I vow to end them.
The Dharma Gates are boundless,
I vow to open them.
The Enlightened Way is unsurpassable,
I vow to embody it.

This being a monk, or better not!
Qudanilyr
Jiryu's account of his time in a Japanese monastery, and his reasons for going, is fresh and honest, and his courage in telling a tale that doesn't always show his younger self to be the Stone Buddha he takes himself for inspires trust.

"Two Shores" is the "Empty Mirror" of our time; a probing, engaging record of one Westerner's encounter with Asian practice. A real shame publishers didn't understand that when Jiryu submitted his manuscript to them. I'm grateful he decided to self-publish, even though it's an expensive, self-sacrificing route to readership.

Anyone who's troubled by our all-too-mortal Zen establishment; suffers from Real Zen Disorder; is interested in Japanese practice models; or just likes a good Zen yarn, should do the writer and themselves a favour and pick up a copy.

For my complete in-depth review, see Rusty Ring: Reflections of an Old-Timey Hermit. (Scroll down to "Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Byler" in the index on the left side of the blog.)
Maveri
We read this book in our Zen book discussion group. Most people liked it. I liked it very much. The author goes to a strict Zen monastery in Japan, looking for "True Zen". He is honest about what he finds and what he doesn't find. He asks some key questions like: "Where did we ever get the idea that if we sat still enough long enough it would all stop hurting?"

I've asked myself the same sort of questions. It felt good to see a serious practitioner asking them in print.
Nayatol
I've read many memoirs and personal accounts of people on a spiritual quest of one kind or another. But I’ve seldom read an account as honest as this one. I thought it was somewhat funny, certainly not hilarious. But it’s a frank and brave account–and wonderfully written. As a writer myself, I’m appalled that Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Bylar couldn’t find a traditional publisher for this impressive work.
RUsich155
This was a surprisingly interesting book. I am in the zen community and it all rang true. Because it was independently published I wondered if it was good. I liked it a lot and highly recommend it to other readers.
Kathy Whilden
Kazijora
I found Rutschman-Byler's account to be totally fascinating. A very subjective and informed perspective of immersion in Zen practice, both in California and Japan. With admirable frankness the author examines his ideas about things like purity, enlightenment, devotion, asceticism and paints for us the story of his personal journey. What is the "middle way" in modern life? I was moved by his sincerity and his willingness to portray the turmoil of his emotional life in the midst of Buddhist community and "just sitting". I also learned some new things about the social history of Zen both in the U.S. and Japan.
A searingly honest comparative personal account of Zen practice in California and Japan. Jiryu Mark Rutschman-Blyer's account of what's gained and what's lost through each approach to practice is thoughtful and well-articulated. The book treats "What is authentic practice?" as the koan it actually is. Highly recommended!
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