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Fb2 The Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning ePub

by Linda Ziedrich

Category: Parenting
Subcategory: Relationships and Parenting
Author: Linda Ziedrich
ISBN: 1558320660
ISBN13: 978-1558320666
Language: English
Publisher: Harvard Common Press; 1 edition (November 11, 1994)
Pages: 208
Fb2 eBook: 1459 kb
ePub eBook: 1434 kb
Digital formats: lit doc mbr lrf

Linda Ziedrich (Author). I loved The Nursing Mother's Companion, and thus, was hoping this would be a perfect sequel. and the 10 pages in this book didn't really provide any new or different ideas

Linda Ziedrich (Author). and the 10 pages in this book didn't really provide any new or different ideas. I am/was specifically stumped by how to wean at nap and bed time (he is used to falling asleep while nursing) and I was hoping this book would provide some new ideas on how to break this habit.

Everything a nursing mother needs to know about weaning by breastfeeding expert, Kathleen Huggins. Jul 09, 2017 Christia Katz Mulvey rated it it was ok.

Everything a nursing mother needs to know about weaning by brea. by Kathleen Huggins, Linda Ziedrich. Books related to Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning - Revised. The Impatient Woman's Guide to Getting Pregnant.

Additional Product Features. Linda Ziedrich, Kathleen Huggins. Place of Publication. The Body a Guide for Occupants Book Bryson Bill ISBN 08. £1. 7 New. -- Used.

The number of books you must read is dependent on which For more than twenty-five years, Kathleen Huggins, . has dedicated her medical career to helping mothers care more effectively for. Kathleen Huggins, Linda Ziedrich. Weaning: The Physical Part for Mom. The Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning.

Book Format: Choose an option. Everything a nursing mother needs to know about weaning by breastfeeding expert, Kathleen Huggins. Tell us if something is incorrect. Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning - Revised - eBook.

Huggins, Kathleen; Ziedrich, Linda. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on May 26, 2010.

In her book, Mothering Your Nursing Toddler, Norma Jane Bumgarner gives us this glimpse into the history of the . Kathleen Huggins and Linda Ziedrich, in The Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning, give an interesting glimpse into weaning practices of other cultures.

In her book, Mothering Your Nursing Toddler, Norma Jane Bumgarner gives us this glimpse into the history of the decline in breastfeeding duration in English-speaking countries. She reports that according to a study of advice given to mothers by doctors from 1550 to 1900: It was not until 1800 that most of the popular English writings on child care recommended weaning as young as 12 months.

Experts say that breastfeeding success depends on getting off to a good start, and much of this book is devoted to advice for resolving breastfeeding difficulties that often lead to early weaning. Best-selling author and lactation expert Kathleen Huggins and co-author Linda Ziedrich make it easier than ever for you to bottle-feed safely, introduce solids gradually, and find new ways to keep a growing child secure and happy during and after weaning.

Discusses why, how, and when to wean a baby, covering age-specific issues for babies from younger than four months old to a child over three years of age
Comments to eBook The Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning
Shliffiana
This book begins with a fascinating chapter on the history and sociology of Breastfeeding and Weaning [and the politics as well!]. I found that very interesting. More than 90 pages of the book are devoted to how to wean a baby who is less than 12 months old - which might be helpful to many moms, but is useless to anyone who is nursing a baby older than that. I found the book to be VERY honest and direct on both the pros and cons of weaning in each age category [0-4 mos, 5-12 mos, 1-2 yrs, 3 and older]. The author was very supportive of a mother's wish to wean [or not], regardless of her reasons and gave the facts about the benefits and costs of the decision in a very forthright and non-judgemental fashion. She included a huge number of practical tips on weaning in different situations and for different reasons. She offered information on every choice available without judgement - including some methods condemned by most Breastfeeding Advocates - such as weaning by "abandonment", applying disgusting or pain-inducing substances to the breast to traumatize the baby out of wanting to nurse, and weaning by frightening the baby. I didn't care for those methods, but she was certainly honest and thorough on ALL the options available. She gave many, many tips on methods that might be more healthy for the baby as well, and I felt the book was very complete.
shustrik
Helpful, well-written, great examples and easy application. Would recommend to anyone looking to wean gently and effectively. Glad that this book exists!
Vetalol
Best book ever, on so many levels.
Alsantrius
I checked this book out at my local library, and am glad I did not spend the money on it.
I was looking for advice on how and when to begin the weaning process for my 10 1/2 month old child (I plan on continuing to nurse until a year), and while the book gave good advice on some of the things you can do, the authors also seemed to discourage mothers from weaning their children until the toddler years (3+ years).
The authors go into the history of nursing (at great length), and how other cultures do it, as well as strongly discouraging formula feeding. I found their philosophies to be unrealistic at times and think that this type of information better belongs in the nursing book, not a book on weaning.
What I was hoping to see in this book was more advice on what to substitute nursing with in cases such as getting a cranky baby to take a nap or to get the child down to sleep for the night (when all other methods fail). There was little, if any, information on this.
Save yourself the money and check this book out at your local library.
Nikobar
I though that Kathleen Huggin's book on breastfeeding was terrific, but this one is a bomb. Although some readers will probably think that the first chapter on the cultural and histroical aspects of nursing is a yawner, it was actually my favorite part of the book. (It didn't help me with my weaning concern; I just thought it was interesting.) Like other reviewers, I perceived the book to be more a list of reasons that you might be considering weaning (and ideas to help you get around whatever your reason is) and less information on the actual process of weaning. Personally, I am a proponent of breastfeeding past one year, but I figure if you're reading a book on weaning, it should be about weaning.
Dangerous
Although The Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning provides good information about the normalcy of extended breastfeeding, I felt there was too much emphasis on mother-led weaning, even including some rather harsh methods such as applying a foul-tasting substance to the breasts.
My two year old is a heavy nurser, and this book actually fueled my anxiety by suggesting that he should be breastfed after eating solids. The book does not give guidance for what (if anything) I should do when my son refuses solids and escalates his requests to nurse.
I would recommend Diane Bengson's How Weaning Happens for a more reassuring approach.
Connorise
I picked up this book because I was looking for practical advice about weaning. Hey, with a title like "The Nursing Mother's Guide to Weaning," that's pretty much what you would expect, right? A "guide to weaning"? Apparently not. Instead I found page after page of guilt-inducing arguments as to why I should nurse, nurse, nurse my daughter until she was well into the preschool years, and that she would somehow be damaged if I did not. Even a full year of breastfeeding is far, far less than your child truly needs and deserves, this book implies. Look, I have impeccable breastfeeding credentials. I wound up exclusively nursing my first daughter for more than a year, until she weaned herself. We didn't even start solids until she wanted to, at 7.5 months. My second daughter is 6.5 months and has never had a drop of formula. I'm even pumping all the milk for her cereal. Like every mother I know, I'm doing the best I can for my kids. But if I make the difficult decision to wean, and decide to buy a book to help me through the process, why should the author try to talk me out of it? Why does she assume I haven't already put a great deal of time and thought into the decision? Perhaps a better title would have been, "If You're Thinking About Weaning." Then she'd probably do a better job of reaching what seems to be her intended audience: long-term breastfeeders who really don't want to wean but are feeling pressured to do so.
The rest of us who already know our own minds are likely to find this tract a bit grating. Enough guilt for now, please! This is the kind of stuff that gives the La Leche League a bad name.
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