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Fb2 Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach (Oxford Core Linguistics) ePub

by David Adger

Category: Words Language and Grammar
Subcategory: Reference
Author: David Adger
ISBN: 0199243700
ISBN13: 978-0199243709
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (May 29, 2003)
Pages: 440
Fb2 eBook: 1404 kb
ePub eBook: 1633 kb
Digital formats: lit lrf doc azw

David Adger's book, "Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach" is currently being used for a class on generative syntax that I'm taking.

David Adger's book, "Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach" is currently being used for a class on generative syntax that I'm taking. I have mixed feelings about it. From a student's perspective, it's extremely dense because Adger takes so much time motivating the system he's proposing throughout the book. It's almost like a syntactic novel in that sense. Each chapter can't really stand alone because it's slowly building on itself and each chapter motivates something that comes along in the following chapter.

Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach. Core syntax is a somewhat cheeky name for a textbook. Preface i. 1 Core Concepts 1. What is a sentence? . . My knowledge of history is extremely partial, forgettable, explicit and learned.

Oxford University Press. It assumes no prior knowledge of linguistic theory and little of elementary grammar. It will suit students coming to syntactic theory for the first time either as graduates or undergraduates

Oxford University Press. It will suit students coming to syntactic theory for the first time either as graduates or undergraduates. It will also be useful for those in fields such as computational science, artificial intelligence, or cognitive psychology who need a sound knowledge of current syntactic theory.

A Minimalist Approach. Oxford: Oxford University Press; and also Carnie, Andrew. Johnson, David E. and Shalom Lappin (1997), "A Critique of the Minimalist Program" in Linguistics and Philosophy 20, 273–333, and Johnson, David E. and Shalom Lappin (1999). Local Constraints vs Economy. Lappin, Shalom, Robert Levine and David E. Johnson (2000a). The Structure of Unscientific Revolutions. D Adger, P Svenonius. The Oxford handbook of linguistic minimalism, 27-51, 2011. Features: Perspectives on a key notion in linguistics, 185-218, 2010. Oxford University Press, 2003. Predication and equation. Linguistic inquiry 34 (3), 325-359, 2003. Merge and Move: Wh-Dependencies Revisited. Three domains of finiteness: A minimalist perspective. Finiteness: Theoretical and empirical foundations, 23-58, 2007. Variation in agreement: A lexical feature-based approach.

Core syntax is a somewhat cheeky name for a textbook. There are many ‘core’ aspects of syntax, depending on the viewpoint you take. In this book, I have tried to highlight three aspects. Many working syntacticians will disagree that these are the core areas, but I hope that everyone will agree that they at least provide a consistent perspective. In the book, I develop certain theoretical ideas which stem from the concerns articulated by Chomsky, and I use these ideas to build a system.

Minimalist syntax and Core syntax are reasonably good textbooks . They should be very helpful indeed in teaching a syntax course on current Principles and Parameters theory (P&P; Chomsky 1981) that focuses on the Minimalist Program (MP; Chomsky 1995, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2005). The books present a range of syntactic phenomena, which are for the most part discussed lucidly and illustrated by considerable relevant data. E-mail: ash asudeheton. ca, ida toivoneneton. Oxford Core Linguistics. Provides a fully up to date theoretical framework for the study of syntax within the Chomskyan Minimalist model. Emphasis on structure of syntactic arguments and on the interaction between theory, analysis, and data clearly illustrates how syntactic arguments are developed.

Core Syntax : A Minimalist Approach. David Adger is Professor of Linguistics at Queen Mary, University of London

Core Syntax : A Minimalist Approach. By (author) David Adger. David Adger is Professor of Linguistics at Queen Mary, University of London.

This is an introduction to the structure of sentences in human languages. It assumes no prior knowledge of linguistic theory and little of elementary grammar. It will suit students coming to syntactic theory for the first time either as graduates or undergraduates. It will also be useful for those in fields such as computational science, artificial intelligence, or cognitive psychology who need a sound knowledge of current syntactic theory.
Comments to eBook Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach (Oxford Core Linguistics)
Macage
David Adger's book, "Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach" is currently being used for a class on generative syntax that I'm taking. I have mixed feelings about it. From a student's perspective, it's extremely dense because Adger takes so much time motivating the system he's proposing throughout the book. It's almost like a syntactic novel in that sense. Each chapter can't really stand alone because it's slowly building on itself and each chapter motivates something that comes along in the following chapter.

However, all of this motivation, while helping to create one logical system, can be a bit awkward or ponderous. It's as if the justifications are so obscure or "illogical" (Thanks Mr. Spock), that, at times, Adger is forcing his system a bit.

Not having a background with the earlier incarnations of generative syntax (government & binding, principles & parameters, etc), I can't really comment on how Adger is redefining the processes that were taking place in those systems. But I can say that, given the system that Adger is proposing, his book does a nice job of including plenty of details to clarify (even if the clarifications are a bit obscure) his purpose.
Qwert
I'm taking an introductory syntax course and using this book. The book is too wordy and at the same time overuses abstract concepts that are just introduced mostly without examples which could have made the text understandable. The author refers you to different chapters from the very beginning to understand each concept making you feel overwhelmed. He could just explain things simply, move on and get to other points when it's the right time. The concepts are easily understandable when a teacher explains them to me but this book just makes me feel I'm stupid. I have never found a book this difficult and don't really know why my teacher asked us to purchase this for an introductory course in syntax.
Jeb
For those who need or want a strong introduction to minimalist syntax, this is an essential book. Simply a must.
Chinon
Adger is very clear in his explanations, and he does a good job making difficult subject matter understandable. There are some typos, but that doesn't stop me from giving the book five stars.
Precious
This book is very valuable. Reading this book will prepare you to real syntax arguments. I do recommend this book for anyone who is interested in theoretical syntax.
Bralore
The book is written within the most recent minimalist framework, which is based on "Derivation by Phase" (Chomsky 2001). Upper intermediate undergraduate students on Linguistics or graduate students will find out the book an excellent and updated guide to understand what's going on on Syntax. However, I don't think that this book is easy for students who don't have any background in generative Syntax. Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach (Core Linguistics)
Oghmaghma
We used this book as a text for a 400 level undergraduate advanced syntax course this summer (2004). Part of the purpose of the course was to evaluate the suitability of this book as a text (and minimalism as content material) for linguistics majors taking a 200 level syntax class in the future.

The book is highly technical, as is any serious linguistics text. According to the description, it is designed for readers with no linguistics background, but we were unable to imagine it being used as a text for any class beneath the level of ours. It probably would be more appropriate for use in a graduate seminar. There is no way it could be used for freshman with no linguistics background, and at the 300 level, English majors would be hung out to dry.

Issues? Lots of them made the book's arguments and logic hard to grasp. You're following with difficulty, reading and rereading as a concept is developed, and suddenly you realize one of the definitions you were given at the beginning has been completely changed, with no indication or explanation.

The book was full of obscure examples, which raised more questions than it answered at times, because common examples don't fit in the paradigm.

Examples of tree structure were very limited, showing only fragments of trees, which made the exercises at the end of the chapter extraordinarily difficult and time-consuming.

The last chapter seemed to be written as an afterthought. I think if the author had reread his examples, he would have seen that the verbs he had used as examples in his comparison were in no way functionally equivalent, although he seemed to be under the impression they were.

Proofreading would have been helpful, as there were lots of typos, some of which changed the meaning of the text or examples.

Some of us ended up wondering the extent to which the problems were with the book, and the extent to which they were with minimalism itself.
The other reviewer is absolutely right--this text is NOT an entry-level text, even though it claims to be. I have an M.A. in linguistics and am currently working on a Ph.D., and I have some background in syntax, and I find this text quite difficult to follow. Some examples Adger lists as ungrammatical are grammatical, and vice versa. Adger seems to sometimes make claims without adequate explanation to the reader (e.g., he lists Adjective as [+Verb, -Noun]), which is disturbing because this is supposedly an introductory text. If you want an introduction to Minimalism, don't look here. If you're already a specialist in the field, this may be a good addition to you're collection (but you should be the judge of that--check it out from the library first).
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