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Fb2 The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan (Asia-Pacific: Culture, Politics, and Society) ePub

by Barbara Sato

Category: Womens Studies
Subcategory: Political books
Author: Barbara Sato
ISBN: 082233044X
ISBN13: 978-0822330448
Language: English
Publisher: Duke University Press Books (April 16, 2003)
Pages: 256
Fb2 eBook: 1969 kb
ePub eBook: 1160 kb
Digital formats: azw mobi lit lrf

Now the 'new women’ of interwar Japan join their subversive sisters around the globe in this vivid presentation of the social imaginaries of the modern girl, the housewife, and the professional working woman of middle-class Tokyo.

Now the 'new women’ of interwar Japan join their subversive sisters around the globe in this vivid presentation of the social imaginaries of the modern girl, the housewife, and the professional working woman of middle-class Tokyo. Self-consciously modern, they were also evoked by their critics to redefine modernity, though not necessarily in directions they themselves might have wished. A new story, an old story, well told and nicely illustrated. Carol Gluck, Columbia University.

Now the 'new women’ of interwar Japan join their subversive sisters around the globe in this vivid presentation of the .

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Japanese women in the Interwar period. The New Japanese Woman. Asia-pacific: Culture, Politics, And. Society. In magazines, books, and movies, women became prominent icons of the modern city, strolling through bustling shopping districts and becoming a presence on crowded buses and streetcars. These images of women were notable for their mutability as well as their novelty: the persona of the shopper changed as quickly as fashions in clothing; the middle-class housewife remade herself as she moved from one hobby to another.

The New Japanese Woman is rich in descriptive detail and full of fascinating vignettes from Japan’s interwar media and consumer t stores, film, radio, popular music and the publishing industry. Sato pays particular attention to the enormously influential role of the women’s magazines, which proliferated during this period.

Duke University Press, 2003. The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan.

Sato situates these three new images of women in the context of an. .

Sato situates these three new images of women in the context of an emerging mass urban culture, which was facilitated by a strong economy, new technology, and increasingly high literacy. She relies extensively on mass women's magazines of the day, but also draws evidence from other forms of media including songs, radio, and movies. Women were vital to this newly developing popular culture in their role as consumers. We are a sharing community. Report "Sato the New Japanese Woman Modernity Media and Women in Interwar Japan". Please fill this form, we will try to respond as soon as possible. So please help us by uploading 1 new document or like us to download

Gender and Modernity: Rereading Japanese Women's Magazines.

Gender and Modernity: Rereading Japanese Women's Magazines. Genbun itchi no rekishiron kō 言文一致の歴史論考. In Kyōka zenshū, Vol. 12, 595-678. Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, 1940. Kawabata Yasunari 川端康成. Asakusa kureinaidan 浅草紅団. Tokyo: Shinchōsha, 1980.

The Attractive Empire: Colonial Asia in Japanese Imperial Film Culture . Women in the Dunes (1964).

The Attractive Empire: Colonial Asia in Japanese Imperial Film Culture, 1931-1953. University of California, Los Angeles. 2000) Bazerman, C. Tune in Play and Film: Macbeth and Throne of Blood, Literature/Film Quarterly. Duke University Press, Durham.

Presenting a vivid social history of “the new woman” who emerged in Japanese culture between the world wars, The New Japanese Woman shows how images of modern women burst into Japanese life in the midst of the urbanization, growth of the middle class, and explosion of consumerism resulting from the postwar economic boom, particularly in the 1920s. Barbara Sato analyzes the icons that came to represent the new urban femininity—the “modern girl,” the housewife, and the professional working woman. She describes how these images portrayed in the media shaped and were shaped by women’s desires. Although the figures of the modern woman by no means represented all Japanese women, they did challenge the myth of a fixed definition of femininity—particularly the stereotype emphasizing gentleness and meekness—and generate a new set of possibilities for middle-class women within the context of consumer culture. The New Japanese Woman is rich in descriptive detail and full of fascinating vignettes from Japan’s interwar media and consumer industries—department stores, film, radio, popular music and the publishing industry. Sato pays particular attention to the enormously influential role of the women’s magazines, which proliferated during this period. She describes the different kinds of magazines, their stories and readerships, and the new genres the emerged at the time, including confessional pieces, articles about family and popular trends, and advice columns. Examining reactions to the images of the modern girl, the housewife, and the professional woman, Sato shows that while these were not revolutionary figures, they caused anxiety among male intellectuals, government officials, and much of the public at large, and they contributed to the significant changes in gender relations in Japan following the Second World War.
Comments to eBook The New Japanese Woman: Modernity, Media, and Women in Interwar Japan (Asia-Pacific: Culture, Politics, and Society)
Agalen
A very interesting read.
Zololmaran
This is an excellent overview of a topic that has not received much attention in academic circles, specifically, Japanese women's magazines in the 1920s and 30s. But to be clear, this is an academic book, and specifically addressing the literary/cultural studies field. The comments below that the book does not address economic trends is irrelevant. For scholars who are looking for an informed, well-researched, and well-written guide to prewar women's magazines, and for information on the formation of normative images of Japanese women, this is a good place to start.
Pedar
The author has found a very interesting topic and assembled a good array of source material. Unfortunately her style, while thankfully relatively free of jargon and theory, fails to develop her ideas and jumps around so the thinking does not develop.

Instead she endlessly repeats that there was a connection between concepts of modernity, consumerism and the 'moga'/'modern woman' without developing how this simple idea played out in Japan in different ways to the similar phenomenon elsewhere at the same time. She does not develop the historical background in a coherent fashion - e.g. the role of World War 1 , given that Japan was the only wartime ally who did not engage in significant fighting but economically gained huge benefits and colonies, all of which had various social impacts. The development of her colonies, particularly Manchuria, is not analysed on her theme.

Most significantly, she fails to put her ideas into the essential political and economic context without which the theme of the book is rendered almost meaningless. It would be impossible from this book to know, for example, that Japan suffered two major economic depressions (at the end of world war 1, and from 1927) during the period covered - what impact did that have? We learn right at the end that even after the war the number of 'love marriages' rather than arranged marriages was still only 15% - so how much social impact had the aims of the new woman really had?

The reason why the author fails to grasp some of these broad themes is that she does not put the 'new woman' into the wider issue - how did the 'new man' of the 1920s and 1930s respond to the aspirations of newly liberated women? How did political discourse engage and change because of these social developments - e.g. from this book it would almost be impossible to understand that Japan invaded East Asia and provoked a world war - what was the 'new woman' doing whilst all that was going on?
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