» » Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago (Illinois)

Fb2 Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago (Illinois) ePub

by Eric Klinenberg

Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Political books
Author: Eric Klinenberg
ISBN: 0226443221
ISBN13: 978-0226443225
Language: English
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 1St Edition edition (July 15, 2003)
Pages: 328
Fb2 eBook: 1479 kb
ePub eBook: 1950 kb
Digital formats: lit docx lrf txt

In Heat Wave, Eric Klinenberg takes us inside the anatomy of the metropolis to conduct what he calls a "social autopsy," examining the . The 1995 heat wave in Chicago was more than a natural disaster, it was a social disaster.

In Heat Wave, Eric Klinenberg takes us inside the anatomy of the metropolis to conduct what he calls a "social autopsy," examining the social, political, and institutional organs of the city that made this urban disaster so much worse than it ought to have been. Starting with the question of why so many people died at home alone, Klinenberg investigates why some neighborhoods experienced greater mortality than others, how the city government responded to the crisis, and how journalists, scientists, and public officials reported on and explained these events.

In Heat Wave, Eric Klinenberg takes us inside the anatomy of the metropolis to conduct what he calls a "social autopsy," examining . By the end of Heat Wave, Klinenberg has traced the lines of culpability in dozens of directions, drawing a dense and subtle portrait of exactly what happened during that week in July. Micaela di Leonardo The Nation. A trenchant, multilayered and well-written social autopsy of disaster.

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In Heat Wave, Eric Klinenberg takes us inside the anatomy of the metropolis to conduct what he calls a "social autopsy," examining the social, political, and institutional organs of the city that made this urban disaster so much worse than it ought to have been

In Heat Wave, Eric Klinenberg takes us inside the anatomy of the metropolis to conduct what he calls a "social autopsy," examining the social, political, and institutional organs of the city that made this urban disaster so much worse than it ought to have been.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Klinenberg's first book, Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago .

Klinenberg's first book, Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2002.

Heat Wave - Eric Klinenberg. A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago 60637. The University of Chicago Press, Lt. London. The university of chicago press. When I did my fieldwork in Chicago, Edward Lawlor welcomed me as a visiting scholar at the University of Chicago’s Center for Health Administration Studies and introduced me to a network of local organizations concerned with health and aging.

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002. Over the course of less than one week, when temperatures in the city topped 100 degrees, many of the most vulnerable city residents were found dead and alone in their sweltering homes.

Klinenberg's book investigates the heat wave of midsummer 1995 and its human and institutional impacts on the city of Chicago. The Heat Index reached 126F on July 13th; on July 14th, Chicago witnessed its hottest day of its recorded history

Klinenberg's book investigates the heat wave of midsummer 1995 and its human and institutional impacts on the city of Chicago. The Heat Index reached 126F on July 13th; on July 14th, Chicago witnessed its hottest day of its recorded history. From July 13 to July 20, more than 700 people died. Most were elderly, living alone, isolated, and often not discovered for days. One of the deadliest heat waves in the US was upon the city.

Eric Klinenberg's new book "Heat Wave" gives readers a tremendous insight into the Chicago heat wave of 1995. Do you remember the heat wave in Chicago in 1995? The rail lines folded, electricity went out with rolling blackouts, some streets even buckled. He approaches this tragedy from several fronts. The heat was over 100 degrees, rarely dipping below the 80's at night, and the humidity near 100%.

On Thursday, July 13, 1995, Chicagoans awoke to a blistering day in which the temperature would reach 106 degrees. The heat index, which measures how the temperature actually feels on the body, would hit 126 degrees by the time the day was over. Meteorologists had been warning residents about a two-day heat wave, but these temperatures did not end that soon. When the heat wave broke a week later, city streets had buckled; the records for electrical use were shattered; and power grids had failed, leaving residents without electricity for up to two days. And by July 20, over seven hundred people had perished-more than twice the number that died in the Chicago Fire of 1871, twenty times the number of those struck by Hurricane Andrew in 1992—in the great Chicago heat wave, one of the deadliest in American history.Heat waves in the United States kill more people during a typical year than all other natural disasters combined. Until now, no one could explain either the overwhelming number or the heartbreaking manner of the deaths resulting from the 1995 Chicago heat wave. Meteorologists and medical scientists have been unable to account for the scale of the trauma, and political officials have puzzled over the sources of the city's vulnerability. In Heat Wave, Eric Klinenberg takes us inside the anatomy of the metropolis to conduct what he calls a "social autopsy," examining the social, political, and institutional organs of the city that made this urban disaster so much worse than it ought to have been.Starting with the question of why so many people died at home alone, Klinenberg investigates why some neighborhoods experienced greater mortality than others, how the city government responded to the crisis, and how journalists, scientists, and public officials reported on and explained these events. Through a combination of years of fieldwork, extensive interviews, and archival research, Klinenberg uncovers how a number of surprising and unsettling forms of social breakdown—including the literal and social isolation of seniors, the institutional abandonment of poor neighborhoods, and the retrenchment of public assistance programs—contributed to the high fatality rates. The human catastrophe, he argues, cannot simply be blamed on the failures of any particular individuals or organizations. For when hundreds of people die behind locked doors and sealed windows, out of contact with friends, family, community groups, and public agencies, everyone is implicated in their demise.As Klinenberg demonstrates in this incisive and gripping account of the contemporary urban condition, the widening cracks in the social foundations of American cities that the 1995 Chicago heat wave made visible have by no means subsided as the temperatures returned to normal. The forces that affected Chicago so disastrously remain in play in America's cities, and we ignore them at our peril.
Comments to eBook Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago (Illinois)
betelgeuze
When asked about weather related events that incur the deaths of hundreds of people, most think of hurricanes, floods, or large tornado outbreaks. Few would think that summer heat would bring on the deaths of over 700 people. Heat, in temperatures as low as 80 degrees Fahrenheit is responsible for more deaths annually than all other weather events combined. As a life-long weather enthusiast, I'd have enjoyed reading more about the atmospheric conditions that brought about the heat wave. But, that's not the authors intentions. His focus is on how a large metropolitan area can be brought to it's knees by a sustained heat wave. It's also largely a story of the "have's" and the "have nots". People in poverty-stricken areas or living on a low or fixed income suffered the most. Deprived of relief from the heat in any way, some literally suffocated to death in their apartments. While a heat wave like this is almost an annual occurrence here in Oklahoma, for the residents of Chicago, it was indeed a tragic yet forgotten disaster of historical proportions.
Danskyleyn
Another reviewer claims that the author is literally the only person on earth who cares about this subject. This is illuminating, because his subject is 700 people who died, not exactly because no one cared about them, but because of complex social processes that rendered them invisible and isolated them from anyone who would care about them. The author does a masterful job of analyzing how this came to be so, and in the process offers a convincing and starkly damning portrait of the modern American city and the individualistic, privatizing ideologies that have shaped it.
Ochach
In Heat Wave, the author presents a compelling and complex portrait of a natural and social disaster. Many of us might not think of a heat wave as a natural disaster in the way we think, say, of hurricanes or tornadoes or earthquakes. (I hadn't thought this way.) But in the U.S., as the author documents, heat waves have taken more lives than the other three events combined.

The 1995 heat wave in Chicago was more than a natural disaster, it was a social disaster. It was social because many of the deaths could have been prevented, the author contends. Through a mix of historical research and interviews, the author shows how issues such as age, race, and economics affected those who lived, and those who died. The author is at his most compelling when he compares North Lawndale and South Lawndale. Although both communities are similar in terms of income, North Lawndale is primarily African American, while South Lawndale is primarily Hispanic. The death rates in North Lawndale were significantly higher than in South Lawndale during the heat wave, and the author presents an extensive study of what might have caused that. He even goes so far as to compare the abilities of small, independent churches (prevalent in North Lawndale) and large, Roman Catholic churches (prevalent in South Lawndale) to look after parishioners.

What emerges from the author's extensive research is a complex portrait. Through his research, he brings in numerous players, not only community members but experts from the fields of medicine, politics, science, and journalism. This book is worth reading not only for understanding how a heat wave could kill over 700 people but also for understanding how citizens, politicians, scientists, journalists, and others are likely to react to natural disasters.
BOND
I had to buy this for school but i really enjoyed reading the book. Well written and being non-fiction I was compelled to do more reading about the heatwave after i finished reading it.

The story moves along quickly and the investigating Klinenberg puts in really pays off.

Volcanic activity, who knew! Just kidding, I won't give the story away.
Qumenalu
If you like nonfiction that reads like a page-turner, you will love this book. Klinenberg examines this amazing event in Chicago's history from every possible perspective: meteorological, historical, political, economic, sociological, anthropological, geographical. It's a brilliant work and reads a lot like "The Perfect Storm" in that you learn about a fascinating and true event, but you learn so much more, in unexpected directions. Highly, highly recommended.
Dynen
Interesting reading on a disaster that hopefully will never happen again. As we become more isolated, such isolated individuals will become more vulnerable. Klunenberg offers plenty to consider in an engaging read.
Ynneig
Very thorough review and recommended for any nurses or officials interested in public health and social policy
this is non-fiction that reads like some crazy story someone made up. it's one of those "can't look away" moments in US history. got it for a gift for someone that likes to read this sort of disaster/news/history type of book and he loves it.
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