» » Let Them In: The Case for Open Borders

Fb2 Let Them In: The Case for Open Borders ePub

by Jason L. Riley

Category: Politics and Government
Subcategory: Political books
Author: Jason L. Riley
ISBN: 1592404316
ISBN13: 978-1592404315
Language: English
Publisher: Avery; Reprint edition (December 30, 2008)
Pages: 256
Fb2 eBook: 1328 kb
ePub eBook: 1719 kb
Digital formats: mobi rtf doc mbr

Let Them In" is a welcome contribution to a national discussion that is too often dominated by fear-mongering and .

Let Them In" is a welcome contribution to a national discussion that is too often dominated by fear-mongering and misinformation. He hasalso appeared on The NewsHour with JimLehrer, Hannity and Colmes and ABC’s WorldNews Tonight.

A conservative columnist makes an eye-opening case for why immigration improves the lives of Americans and is important for the future of the country.

A conservative columnist makes an eye-opening case for why immigration. A conservative columnist makes an eye-opening case for why immigration improves the lives of Americans and is important for the future of the country.

In 2014, Riley published Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed

In 2014, Riley published Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed.

A conservative columnist makes an eye-opening case for why immigration improves the lives of Americans and is. .

In Please Stop Helping Us, Jason L. Riley examines how well-intentioned welfare programs are in fact holding black Americans back. Minimum-wage laws may lift earnings for people who are already employed, but they price a disproportionate number of blacks out of the labor force. Affirmative action in higher education is intended to address past discrimination, but the result is fewer black college graduates than would otherwise exist.

The Efficient, Egalitarian, Libertarian, Utilitarian Way to Double World GDP" - Bryan Caplan. Continue reading Jason Riley’s solution to the US immigration policy disconnect puzzle . Jason Riley Let Them In US immigration policy disconnect. After reading books by both Krikorian and Riley, I am struck by the contrast in what they consider the natural/efficient state of labor markets to be.

Later in the campaign, in December 1979, Reagan responded to criticism from conservative columnist Holmes . The second is that an open immigration. policy is compatible with free-market conservatism and homeland security

Later in the campaign, in December 1979, Reagan responded to criticism from conservative columnist Holmes Alexander. Please believe me when I tell you the idea of a North American accord has been mine for many, many years," said the future president. policy is compatible with free-market conservatism and homeland security. I explain, from a conservative perspective, why the pessimists who say otherwise are mistaken.

About Let Them In.

Let Them In - Jason L. Riley.

A conservative columnist makes an eye-opening case for why immigration improves the lives of Americans and is important for the future of the country Separating fact from myth in today’s heated immigration debate, a member of The Wall Street Journal editorial board contends that foreign workers play a vital role in keeping America prosperous, that maintaining an open-border policy is consistent with free-market economic principals, and that the arguments put forward by opponents of immigration ultimately don’t hold up to scrutiny. In lucid, jargon-free prose aimed at the general-interest reader, Riley takes on the most common anti-immigrant complaints, including claims that today’s immigrants overpopulate the United States, steal jobs, depress wages, don’t assimilate, and pose an undue threat to homeland security. As the 2008 presidential election approaches with immigration reform on the front burner, Let Them In is essential reading for liberals and conservatives alike who want to bring an informed perspective to the discussion.
Comments to eBook Let Them In: The Case for Open Borders
DarK-LiGht
Good read for immigration discussion to understand pro's and con's of both sides.
Xangeo
Very well written. Very well referenced and documented. Changed my viewpoint of what I have always thought. MUST READ BOOK. Thank you for your very spiteful book.
Yggdi
This book provides a solid argument in favor of largely expanding immigration (although the subtitle says "open borders", nowhere does he really call for truly unlimited immigration), citing multiple studies and extensive research, as well as considerable historical evidence, to support his claims that 1) immigrants do not pressure existing social systems more than natives do, 2) immigrants fill holes in a large labor market, and 3) immigrants are a net benefit to America.

That said, Riley spends a lot of time taking pundits to task for promoting arguments to stop immigration that have no basis in historical fact, which is appropriate. Unfortunately, he proceeds to make multiple statements - for example, linking Charles Darwin to the Eugenics movement, and claiming that charter schools will fix education problems, without providing any historical basis for them (in the case of the former, there is none - Riley gamely tries to re-interpret the title of Darwin's book as such, which is silly). This makes the reader question the strength of the rest of his statements. Even worse, these statements are asides, which really have very little to do with the central argument, so they weaken the author's position without really adding to his argument. Riley also wears his political affiliation on his sleeve, which is, of course, his right, but again adds a certain amount of writing that doesn't really bear on immigration.

My advice to Mr. Riley for the 2nd edition, then, would be to remove everything that does not bear directly on his thesis. I think his arguments about immigration are generally spot-on, but there is a certain amount of irrelevant content in there, without which the book would be better. I would probably give 3-and-a-half if I could.
Bad Sunny
I first saw Jason Riley on FBN's Stossel, and his curious position persuaded me to buy his book. Originally a neoconservative, I was confused about what the truth about immigration was. Quickly becoming a libertarian, I put Riley's argument against that of the likes of Robert Rector and co.

This book began the journey of my conversion, and after much consideration, I now realize that market-based solutions to immigration are best. Furthermore, it is clear to me that there is no economic or cultural "cost" greater than the benefits we receive (and have received for generations) from immigrants. Make legal immigration easy and accessible; the sky will not fall! The policy advocated in this book makes absolute sense when confronted with the Dobbs/Borjas/Rector/O'Reilly model.

Overall, the book was lacking in demagoguery but not in sound data and logic. It was easy enough to comprehend as well. It opened my eyes and was extremely thought-provoking. Buy this book if you will appreciate the side of the immigration debate less told. Abandon the shoddy anecdotal evidence for restrictionism and give this book a fair shake with an open mind.
Zinnthi
if you are looking for a populist viewpoint this isn't it.
In general the book is well done. Probably the most irrefutable
statement (repeated several times) is that immigration is a
wedge issue that speaks to many personal fears and a commonly held
stereotype about immigrants esp Hispanics from Central America.
The observation that this "issue" arises before elections to stampede
voters and then disappears immediately after the election is tough
to answer.
As an overview Riley looks at the six common areas where objections
to immigration arise:
1) population/over-population - does a good job of setting out some
little known connections and facts about this area of debate. Riley
should address "carrying capacity" and does not. Other than footnoting
this chapter extensively Riley meets the objections well.
2) economics - sets forth how much immigrants draw from the US economy
and what they add. Well done. Tackles the 'stealing US jobs' argument.
3) the welfare system - addreses the way barriers to entry into the US
and the factors that cause people to become interested in leaving another
country "select" people that are pre-disposed to seek work aggressively.
4) assimilation - numerous good points including language assimilation
and some contrasts with other countries
5) politics - should be read by all conservative politicos. Enough said.
6) national security - addresses the terrorist objection extremely well.
Worth a read by someone who wants to think about the various aspects to
this issue. There is some discussion of some aspects of a more open
immigration policy as it relates to human capital being in our NATIONAL
INTEREST that are worth some time for intellectually honest readers.
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