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Fb2 Liberation's Children: Parents and Kids in a Postmodern Age ePub

by Kay S. Hymowitz

Category: Politics and Government
Subcategory: Political books
Author: Kay S. Hymowitz
ISBN: 1566634954
ISBN13: 978-1566634953
Language: English
Publisher: Ivan R. Dee; First Edition edition (May 27, 2003)
Pages: 224
Fb2 eBook: 1867 kb
ePub eBook: 1244 kb
Digital formats: txt mobi azw lit

What is life like for children coming of age in an era after feminism, after the sexual revolution? Kay Hymowitz explores the predicament of a generation growing up in a world where adults lavish them with Tommy Hilfigers.

What is life like for children coming of age in an era after feminism, after the sexual revolution? Kay Hymowitz explores the predicament of a generation growing up in a world where adults lavish them with Tommy Hilfigers.

Fear and Loathing at the Day-Care Center - Survivor: The Manhattan Kindergarten - On Sesame Street, It's All Show - Raising Children for an Uncivil Society - Who Killed School Discipline? -.

Liberation's Children book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Liberation's Children: Parents and Kids in a Postmodern Age as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Subtitled Parents and Kids in a Postmodern Age, this book features a number of incisive essays on the perils and pitfalls of parenting in today's world. American author Kay Hymowitz is painfully aware that raising children today is a difficult task at the best of times

Subtitled Parents and Kids in a Postmodern Age, this book features a number of incisive essays on the perils and pitfalls of parenting in today's world. American author Kay Hymowitz is painfully aware that raising children today is a difficult task at the best of times. Children today are exposed to all sorts of pressures and temptations that many of us never had to worry about. Much of the current wisdom as to how children should develop and how moms and dads should parent is simply wrong advice, argues Hymowitz

in a Postmodern Age, published by Ivan R Dee, Inc. The book, a collection of articles, explores the problem of raising children in an individualistic society. Liberation's Children. More information about

Hymowitz talked about her book Liberation’s Children: Parents and Kids in a Postmodern Age, published by Ivan R Dee, Inc. One focus of Ms. Hymowitz’s talk was a recent student hazing incident. After her presentation she answered questions from members of the audience. More information about. Liberation's Children: Parents and Kids in a Postmodern Age. 183 Views.

The articles and books simply stereotype all men as loutish, clueless, Neanderthals.

Their Future and Ours and Liberation's Children: Parents and Kids in a Postmodern Age ( "Kay Hymowitz. Critic Rob Asghar says Kay Hymowitz has a problem with today's young men, and she's willing to say so in the bluntest terms. Hymowitz targets men in her writing in hopes that they will see her view and try to change. The articles and books simply stereotype all men as loutish, clueless, Neanderthals.

Liberation's children. parents and kids in a postmodern age. by Kay S. Hymowitz. Published 2003 by . Fear and Loathing at the Day-Care Center. Survivor: The Manhattan Kindergarten. On Sesame Street, It's All Show. Raising Children for an Uncivil Society. Who Killed School Discipline? Tweens: Ten Going on Sixteen. What's Wrong with the Kids? The L Word: Love as Taboo.

Liberation's children: parents and kids in a postmodern age (2003). Marriage and caste in America: separate and unequal families in a post-marital age (2006). Manning Up: How the Rise of Women Has Turned Men Into Boys (2011). arital breakdown is not rampant across the land. It is concentrated among low-income and black couples

Heart of US Economics. Heart of US Economics.

Heart of US Economics. Affordable Care Act. Broken Windows. OtherCulture & Society.

What is life like for children coming of age in an era after feminism, after the sexual revolution? Kay Hymowitz explores the predicament of a generation growing up in a world where adults lavish them with Tommy Hilfigers, Gameboys, and Disneyland vacations but don't know how to provide them with the ordinary truths that give life meaning. Without a coherent moral and intellectual order to pass on to the young, Ms. Hymowitz argues, parents, teachers, school principals, the media, and the child-rearing experts know only how to celebrate the individual child, "empowering" him to find his own way even as MTV beckons. As Liberation's Children shows, some young people flounder in this spiritual and imaginative void. They curse out teachers and coaches; they try too much too soon; they turn from children into tweens by the time they are eight, and into jaded adults by the time they are fourteen. They become the malcontents of suburban communities. Meanwhile many others eagerly latch on to the one value that seems to cause their elders no ambivalence or embarrassment: personal achievement. As babies they listen to Mozart tapes and use lapware; as toddlers they watch Sesame Street and begin music lessons. By the time they are of school age, they are initiates in the religion of "ecstatic capitalism"-child development has become career preparation. In sharply drawn analyses which first appeared in City Journal, Ms. Hymowitz takes the measure of a young generation afflicted with a loss of deep connection, civility, and moral clarity, as well as a depleted vision of the human predicament.
Comments to eBook Liberation's Children: Parents and Kids in a Postmodern Age
Flamehammer
This book contains a collection of eleven essays written by Kay Hymowitz and which originally appeared in CITY JOURNAL between 1995 and 2002. The subtitle captures the essence of the common subject matter thread which provides the link between them, they are about the relationship of PARENTS AND KIDS IN A POSTMODERN AGE. The essays in the book are arranged to form a sequential analysis of her topic following the age of children from their early experiences in day-care through graduation from college (essay number nine is titled J. CREW U.) and subsequently into a career; they conclude with an examination of the frequent rejection of the goals of radical feminism by many young women today. However, the dates of original publication indicate a much less direct progression of the author's thought process and commentary, they appear to be a combination of responses to her own experiences and research, reactions to the topic du jour and pieces specifically complementing other commentary from the Manhattan Institute (the publishers of City Journal)
My experience is that pieces in collections of this nature are often uneven in quality, but these are uniformly very articulate and well reasoned commentaries by an extremely thoughtful author with a very definite point of view. That point of view can be summarized as a belief that our culture has largely lost its moral moorings, and that we have no intellectual and spiritual base of agreed upon beliefs with which to educate our children. She examines the basis of the elevation of moral relativism and our unwillingness to articulate a framework of absolute values, and concludes that it is due to the several factors but places much of the blame upon the destructive impact caused by the embrace of postmodernism by large segments of the intellectual elite and media opinion leaders (as exemplified by the adoption of deconstructionist philosophy and methodologies in the curriculums of many leading academic institutions). This has both combined with and reinforced the pursuit of goals predominantly measured in material terms, and has often led to extremely counterproductive results even with the best of intentions. (In this regard her criticisms of day care for the wealthy and Sesame Street are fascinating.)
There is a lot in these critiques that is about as far removed from political correctness as possible, and yet at the same time Hymowitz has probably managed to include some comment in the book which will probably distress even her most ardent supporters. I certainly agreed with the overwhelming majority of her points and enjoyed her style immensely, but on occasion felt her commentary slightly offpoint or her analysis somewhat overbroad (e.g. the chapter on ecstatic capitalism). Regardless of your beliefs regarding our cultural childrearing practices, there is clearly reason to be concerned about the education (in the broadest sense) of our youngsters today. While the Columbine tragedy clearly caught the attention of the nation, the problem is not violence per se but what the prevalence of such violence indicates about the frequent alienation exhibited by the youth of today. The debates about the almost certain overprescription of Ritalin, the abysmal performance of many segments of the population on standardized tests, and the elevation of the goals of diversity and multiculturalism have led to the perverse equation of the freedom which we cherish with the lack of necessity for any internal moral compass. Somehow we as a society have not accepted the fact that the greater the freedom in a society, the greater is the need for a firm personal internalization of the agreed upon moral precepts and shared cultural values which are necessary for the society to effectively function.
I highly recommend this book for everyone interested in accumulating background intellectual ammunition in order to more effectively participate in the current debate about society's educational and childrearing practices. After all, there is nothing more important to maintaining the opportunity, freedom and prosperity which we currently enjoy.
Tucker Andersen
Frosha
Hymowitz's collection of essays has not received the attention that it deserves. This is too bad, because it is a powerful scolding the the laissez-faire, "modern," "child-centered," "feminist you-can-have-it-all," day-care and sex-education society that has little moral wisdom to pass to its children. Her observations on how "experts" have caved into what she calls the "Americal Pastorale Child" motif are apt, and acidic. Her fundamental axiom is this: that all (good) child development depends on a transmitted morality based on self-denial and self-discipline. The only way to achieve these is not to depend on the "inherent" capacity of children to develop these, but, instead, on powerful, care-giving, available adult(s) who decline to take shortcuts, and who take moral stands in their lives.
I loved a number of sections of this book. Hymowitz dissects Sesame Street elegantly as a public TV enterprise that teaches kids to watch TV, not learn literacy. She points out that it is a paradox to teach children and adolescents to be free and also to have self-restraint. She takes exception to the "expert" view that children and adolescents "naturally" develop empathy: "And why are well-nurtured teenagers so lacking this natural feeling when it comes to the suffering that their flagrant rudeness causes their parents?" (p. 61).
Great book, a little hard to read casually, but her message is not a casual one. After you finish it, however, you may wonder, "Well, what do I do now?"
Jaiarton
like her other works better.
Sadaron above the Gods
Ms. Hymowitz cuts through today's cultural morass and pinpoints exactly where we are going wrong with today's achievement-oriented but emotionally vacuous and valueless children. From French lessons for six-month olders to starstruck Sesame Street, from desensitizing sex education for middle schoolers to college without distribution requirements, Ms. Hymowitz shows us how today's children are groping for values in a world that promotes work over family and self-expression over love. For anyone perturbed by today's degenerative culture, this profoundly disturbing and incisive book is a must-read.
catterpillar
This is a well-researched book. No gloom here, merely a fascinating and smartly worrying look at the current social world that society has created for itself and the children inside it.
The concentration of this book is not only children, you must not think this; rather the point is that children are where we see first indications that something has gone awry. (Similar to how amphibians are indicator species in larger ecosystems.)
This book concerns itself with the specifics of how broader USA culture has emptied its centre of inherent value which it might pass on, and has ceased to advocate any serious morals, refrained from teaching any lessons, or instructed any in classic rectitude or self-restraint.

One useful quotation:
"But the same forces that have liberated today's kids from want, settled life paths, and confining traditions have also "freed" them from the moral and spiritual guidance that has always come from parents, teachers and the culture at large. The result is not that today's kids "have no values," as pundits often tell us. On the contrary: American children develop Victorian-size superegos dedicated to the command to realise themselves through work. They hear endless moralising about the virtues of tolerance and open-mindedness. The problem is that these virtues, important as they are, cannot help the young person build a self. Unmoored from all the inherited structures of meaning, they tell kids not to judge, but not what to believe. They tell them to embrace all, but not what matters. They tell them to choose, but not why or how. In short, liberation's children live in a culture that frees the mind and soul by emptying them."
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