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Fb2 Mole: The True Story of the First Russian Intelligence Officer Recruited by the CIA ePub

by William Hood

Category: Politics and Government
Subcategory: Political books
Author: William Hood
ISBN: 039301388X
ISBN13: 978-0393013887
Language: English
Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc; 1st edition (April 1, 1982)
Pages: 317
Fb2 eBook: 1453 kb
ePub eBook: 1528 kb
Digital formats: docx mobi lit mbr

The thrilling true story of Lt. Col. Pyotr Popov, the first agent the CIA .

The thrilling true story of Lt. Pyotr Popov, the first agent the CIA recruited within the Soviet intelligence service. Reads like the best of le Carre - but fact. Hood, a retired senior officer in the Central Intelligence Agency served during WWII with the army before transferring to the OSS. Later he stayed on with the CIA and served in Central Europe at the start of the Cold War. Younger readers might find this pretty dry reading. The only book to detail how a spy is recruited and handled from beginning to bitter end. An astonishingly candid and utterly unique instructional manual as well as a gripping history.

Officer Recruited by the . Reads like the best of le Carre - but fact

com: Mole: The True Story of the First Russian Intelligence Officer Recruited by the .

The same was true in the training of the OSS officers who would acquire .

The same was true in the training of the OSS officers who would acquire and han-dle agents. 2 Psychologists in the still developing field of operational psy-chology were integral to selecting OSS officers and teaching them to recruit foreign agents in the field. 9 For good discussions of Pyotr Popov see John L. Hart’s, Pyotr Semyonovich Popov: The Tribulations of Faith, Intelligence and National Security 12 (1977) or William Hood’s, Mole: The True Story of the First Russian Intelligence Officer Recruited by the CIA (Norton and Company, 1982).

Pyotr Semyonovich Popov (Russian: Пётр Семёнович Попов; July 1923 – 1960) was a major in the Soviet military intelligence apparatus (GRU). He was the first GRU officer to offer his services to the Central Intelligence Agency after World War II. Between 1953 and 1958, he provided the United States government with large amounts of information concerning military capabilities and espionage operations. Codenamed ATTIC, for most of his time with the CIA, Popov's case officer was George Kisevalter. Biography and True Story Books in Russian. William S. Burroughs Biographies & True Stories Hardback Non-Fiction Books. William Shakespeare Biographies & True Stories Hardback Non-Fiction Books. True Stories Hardback Biographies & True Stories Books in English. Tennessee Williams Biographies & True Stories Books. True Crime Hardback Biographies & True Stories Books. This item doesn't belong on this page.

William Hood tells a story similar to that of Adolf Tolkachev a generation later: Motivated not by. .William Hood, the nom de plume of a retired CIA officer, gives his story of the first Soviet agent recruited by American intelligence during the Cold War. It is a fascinating, true-life tale.

William Hood tells a story similar to that of Adolf Tolkachev a generation later: Motivated not by greed but by outrage over past injustices inflicted on his family, a well-placed Russian provides the US with priceless information. Eventually, though, he is strung along too long until finally he is undone – not (as far as can be determined) so much through carelessness on our part or clever detective work on Moscow’s, but likely through a mole. Rebirth of Britain (Social Democrat Books) EAN 9780297781905. UK Economy: A Manual of Applied Economics EAN 9780297781813. Philosophy in the Twentieth Century EAN 9780297781790. Bartolome Esteban Murillo EAN 9780297781936. The Cage EAN 9780297782018. Brecht EAN 9780297782063.

Central Intelligence Agency, A Look Back. CIA Asset Pyotr Popov Arrested. Phillip Taubman, New York Times, 23 May 1982, THE USES OF TRADECRAFT. Nigel West (2007), Historical Dictionary of Cold War Counterintelligence, Scarecrow Press, p350. Mole: The True Story of the First Russian Intelligence Officer Recruited by the CIA (New York: Ballantine, 1983), . 17. Hood, p. 03-4 & 217. ^ Hood, . 35. 21-6 & 235-7.

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Documents the espionage career of Pyotr Popov, the first agent recruited by the CIA within the Soviet Intelligence Service
Comments to eBook Mole: The True Story of the First Russian Intelligence Officer Recruited by the CIA
ZEr0
Spoiler Alert: This review, like all of mine, presumes you have already read the book.

William Hood tells a story similar to that of Adolf Tolkachev a generation later: Motivated not by greed but by outrage over past injustices inflicted on his family, a well-placed Russian provides the US with priceless information. Eventually, though, he is strung along too long until finally he is undone – not (as far as can be determined) so much through carelessness on our part or clever detective work on Moscow’s, but likely through a mole. Thus the title could refer not just to this book’s hero Pyotr Popov but to the villain who probably led to his downfall, George Blake. The particular error that undid Tolkachev was made in the US, the one that probably undid Popov in London, but generally speaking there was little warning (in Popov’s case) or virtually none (in Tolkachev’s).

To be fair, Popov never wanted to defect. Even so, both he and Tolkachev should have been brought in before it was too late, no matter how reluctant they may have been. And to be very fair, William Hood does not place the blame for undoing Popov unequivocally on Blake. He leaves open the possibility that Popov’s own carelessness was partly to blame.

Based no doubt on personal experience, Hood holds to the view that those closest to the action have greater realism about what is possible and what not, while those in DC are tempted by unrealistic projects, leading them to ask for the impossible – a trope of this genre, especially if the author is a case officer who has spent significant time on site. He characterizes some of the ideas that originate in Langley as “unrealistically ambitious headquarters schemes” and “the height of folly.” (pg. 112)

The bulk of the book relies on information provided by “Gregory Domnin,” who (according to Wikipedia) appears to be based on an agent named George Kisevalter. Towards the end of the book, though, with the cloak and dagger story over, Hood turns away from his source to spend the last fifty pages or so speculating on what likely happened to Popov after his arrest and what exactly may have led to his undoing. To my own surprise, it was this last section – which by the way provides some background to the movie “The Good Shepherd” – I found the most interesting.

Hood also reviews Soviet-era literature on the case, including a close reading of accounts that appeared in Izvestya in 1963. Some of his deductions may be speculative, but Hood’s speculation is informed. He knows, for example, exactly how cumbersome it is to encipher a text, leading him to deduce that a wordy thank-you message Popov allegedly wrote was probably enhanced for publication, to say the least. He is able to tell which documents are authentic and which faked based on their style as much as content.

On the whole, the book is quite well-written – not one agent is described with the cliché “legendary.” Hood is level-headed and unsentimental – which is quite different from unfeeling. In short, just the sort of guide one would want in this labyrinth of mirrors.
Gholbirius
This is hands down the best book about spies and spying I have ever read. (And I have read dozens of fiction and non-fiction.) it reads like a novel--far better in style, story arc, and pacing than most--but is not fiction. The detailed descriptions of spy craft sprinkled throughout are wonderful (although one imagines a bit dated). Looming over it all is the moral challenge presented by a Soviet officer from peasant roots so outraged by his country's rot that he was willing to give his life in the hope that he could change it.
Faugami
Much has been written about spies, spy-craft and espionage. Little has been written by those actively engaged in the business. William Hood, the nom de plume of a retired CIA officer, gives his story of the first Soviet agent recruited by American intelligence during the Cold War. It is a fascinating, true-life tale. I would recommend this book exclusively on this point, yet there is more to the book than this. It is also a detailed and highly personal account of how spycraft is practiced, the mental and psychological toll this takes, and the risks involved (for both agent and controller). Because of this, I highly recommend this book. I have never read anything like it.
I would add that Hood provides a wealth of books of a similar vein (ie. accounts from intelligence field officers) that may also be of interest. It is without doubt an engrossing and intriguing read.
Sagda
MOLE written by William Hood retired CIA agent.He had to get
permission to write this book from them.

Lots of time consuming research was done.Book published in
1982. Was a good price & in perfect condition. Arrived quickly.
317 pgs.

Major Pyotar Popov was a Russian success story.Raised in a small
village..poor. Very smart, Was noticed by Moscow and was educated
for free.

He was given a job with the GRU. Part of the KGB.Miltary Intel.

He had a wife,a daughter/1 son and a stupid mistress.He was bored
and drank too much. He was forgetful.He played a dangerous game.
Took great risks.

He began spying for the USA in the 1950's.He was in reality a brave
man. He loved Russia.Russia announced in 1962 that he had been execu-
ted.

** Popov may be dead, but the info he gave touched off a debate with
in the CIA that continues to this day. **

This is a interesting book. Well written. I loved it. I could not put
it down. Full of trade craft info.

Missing from the book is photos. I would like to see what Popov looked
like.

Book is exciting and extremly sad too.The Communists that took over
Russia (mostly Stalin in his purges) have killed more than 30 million of
its citizens.

Your heart aches for the people...Note-there is another POPOV that was a
spy, he spied for England..his name was Dusko Popov. He tried to tell J
Edgar Hoover about Perl Harbor and Hoover would not listen.

He was known as TRICYCLE...bbp okc ok 62
Mogelv
Take a deep dive into the Cold War with this classic. Despite the pseudonyms and changed place names, this book has been confirmed by later declassifications in the US and the former Soviet Union
Andromathris
A very informative book about recruitment and running of spies. Their debriefing efforts were really physical undertakings. The recruited "spies" took great risks.
Gavikelv
Great insight into the spy community after WWII.
Anticipation was high.
It was said to be the "best book" anywhere on spycraft.

ah-ha, not so my little dove.

I found it hard to read, not too interesting & not really well written, But maybe someone else
will love it.

I read a lot of books on spy-craft.
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