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Fb2 Aporias (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) ePub

by Thomas Dutoit,Jacques Derrida

Category: Philosophy
Subcategory: Political books
Author: Thomas Dutoit,Jacques Derrida
ISBN: 0804722528
ISBN13: 978-0804722520
Language: English
Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (December 1, 1993)
Pages: 104
Fb2 eBook: 1482 kb
ePub eBook: 1102 kb
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That is the question asked, explored, and analyzed in Jacques Derrida's new book

That is the question asked, explored, and analyzed in Jacques Derrida's new book. My death-is it possible?" That is the question asked, explored, and analyzed in Jacques Derrida's new book.

Series: Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics. Paperback: 168 pages

Series: Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics. Paperback: 168 pages. Jacques Derrida (1930–2004) was a French philosopher and writer, best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as Deconstruction. The translator notes, Jacques Derrida’s ‘On the Name’ comprises three essays, which, if taken together, would ‘form a sort of essay on the Name’. That is the question asked, explored, and analyzed in Jacques Derrida's new book. Focusing on an issue that has informed his work for the last 30 years, Derrida stakes out a new frontier, at which the debate with his work must take place from now on.

That is the question asked, explored, and analyzed in Jacques Derrida's new book

That is the question asked, explored, and analyzed in Jacques Derrida's new book. About the Author: Jacques Derrida (1930–2004) was director of studies at the école des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris, and professor of humanities at the University of California, Irvine.

Bo Bergman, Jacques de Mare, Thomas Svensson, Sara Loren - Robust Design Methodology for Reliability: Exploring the Effects of Variation and Uncertainty. Jacques Derrida - Aporias (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics). Bo Bergman, Jacques de Mare, Thomas Svensson, Sara Loren.

Passions: An Oblique Offering is a reflection on the question of the response, on the duty and obligation to respond, and on the possibility of not responding-which is to say, on the ethics and politics of responsibility.

Le parjure, Perhaps" engages with a remarkable novel by Henri Thomas that fictionalizes the charge of perjury brought against Paul de Man in the 1950s. PDF Online Full Ebook Download Read Without Alibi (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) (Jacques Derrida ) PDF Online Free Download Read Without Alibi (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) (Jacques Derrida ) PDF Online E-Reader Read Read Without Alibi (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) (Jacques Derrida ) PDF Online in English.

Mustapha Cherif, Jacques Derrida, Teresa Lavender Fagan, Giovanna Borradori. Interviews, 1974-1994 (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics).

2 Derrida’s new book bears a special significance because it focuses on an issue that has informed the whole of his work up to the present.

Aporias Jacques Derrida, Thomas Dutoit (translator) Stanford University Press, 1993 . catalog. Derrida’s new book bears a special significance because it focuses on an issue that has informed the whole of his work up to the present. One of the aporetic experiences touched upon is that my death can never be subject to an experience that would be properly mine, that I can have.

"My death―is it possible?"That is the question asked, explored, and analyzed in Jacques Derrida's new book. "Is my death possible?" How is this question to be understood? How and by whom can it be asked, can it be quoted, can it be an appropriate question, and can it be asked in the appropriate moment, the moment of "my death"? One of the aporetic experiences touched upon in this seminal essay is the impossible, yet unavoidable experience that "my death" can never subject to an experience that would be properly mine, that I can have, and account for, yet that there is, at the same time, nothing closer to me and more properly mine than "my death."This book bears a special significance because in it Derrida focuses on an issue that has informed the whole of his work up to the present. For the last thirty years, Derrida has repeatedly, in various contexts and various ways, broached the question of aporia. Making it his central concern here Derrida stakes out a new frontier, at which the debate with his work must take place from now on: the debate about the aporia between singularity and generality, about the national, linguistic, and cultural specificity of experience and the trans-national, trans-cultural law that protects this specificity of experience and of the necessity to continue working in the tradition of critique and of the idea of critique, yet the corresponding necessity to transcend it without compromising it; the aporetical obligation to host the foreigner and the alien and yet to respect him, her, or it as foreign.The foreign or the foreigner has always been considered a figure of death, and death a figure of the foreign. How this figure has been treated in the analytic of death in Heidegger's Being in Time is explored by Derrida in analytical tour de force that will not fail to set new standards for the discussion of Heidegger and for dealing with philosophical texts, with their limits and their aporias. The detailed discussion of the theoretical presuppositions of recent cultural histories of death (Ariès, for example) and of psychological theorizations of death (including Freud's) broaden the scope of Derrida's investigation and indicate the impact of the aporia of "my death" for any possible theory.
Comments to eBook Aporias (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics)
Kulabandis
Jacques Derrida (1930–2004) was a French philosopher and writer, best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as “Deconstruction.”

He explains in the introductory chapter of this 1993 book, “I keep the word ‘problem’ for another reason: so as to put that word in tension with another Greek word, ‘aporia,’ which I chose a long time ago as a title for this occasion, without really knowing where I was going, except that I knew what was going to be at stake in this word was the ‘not knowing where to go.’ …I gave in to the word ‘aporias,’ in the plural, without really knowing where I was going and if something would come to pass, allowing me to pass with it, except that I recalled that… the old, worn-out Greek term ‘aporia’… has often imposed itself on me…” (Pg. 12)

Later, he continues, “[in an essay on the Gulf War] I used the term ‘aporia’ for a SINGLE DUTY that recurrently duplicates itself interminably, fissures itself, and contradicts itself without remaining the same… I suggested that a sort of nonpassive endurance of the aporia was the condition of responsibility and of decision. Aporia, rather than antinomy…” (Pg. 16)

He then states, “Today, in choosing the theme of death, of the syntagm ‘my death’ and of the ‘limits of truth,’ to explore this subject, I will perhaps not speak of anything else under different names, but names matter.” (Pg. 21) Then he poses the question about which the book is written: “Is my death possible? Can we understand this question? Can I, myself, pose it? Am I allowed to talk about my death? What does the syntagm ‘my death’ mean?... I will say very quickly now why ‘my death’ will be the subject of this small aporetic oration. First, I’ll address the aporia, that is, the impossible, the impossibility, as what cannot pass or come to pass… I’ll explain myself with some help from Heidegger’s famous definition of death in ‘Being and Time’: ‘the possibility of the pure and simple impossibility for Dasein.’” (Pg. 21-23)

He observes, “A certain thinking of the POSSIBLE is at the heart of the existential analysis of death… This possibility of the possible beings together on the one hand in the sense of the virtuality or of the immanence of the future, of the ‘that can always happen at any instant,’ one MUST EXPECT IT, I am expecting it, we are expecting it, and on the other hand, the sense of ability, of the possible as that of which I am capable, that for which I have the power, the ability, or the potentiality.” (Pg. 62)

He concludes, “What we have glimpsed… I was able or may be able from now on to make of the aporia, is that if one must endure the aporia, if such is the law of all decision, of all responsibilities, of all duties without duty, and of all the border problems that ever can arise, the aporia can never simply be endured as such. The ultimate aporia is the impossibility of the aporia as such.” (Pg. 78)

Not one of Derrida’s “major works,” this book still contains some interesting writing, and will probably be of interest to those studying Derrida and his thought.
Dranar
Jacques Derrida (1930–2004) was a French philosopher and writer, best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as “Deconstruction.”

He explains in the introductory chapter of this 1993 book, “I keep the word ‘problem’ for another reason: so as to put that word in tension with another Greek word, ‘aporia,’ which I chose a long time ago as a title for this occasion, without really knowing where I was going, except that I knew what was going to be at stake in this word was the ‘not knowing where to go.’ …I gave in to the word ‘aporias,’ in the plural, without really knowing where I was going and if something would come to pass, allowing me to pass with it, except that I recalled that… the old, worn-out Greek term ‘aporia’… has often imposed itself on me…” (Pg. 12)

Later, he continues, “[in an essay on the Gulf War] I used the term ‘aporia’ for a SINGLE DUTY that recurrently duplicates itself interminably, fissures itself, and contradicts itself without remaining the same… I suggested that a sort of nonpassive endurance of the aporia was the condition of responsibility and of decision. Aporia, rather than antinomy…” (Pg. 16)

He then states, “Today, in choosing the theme of death, of the syntagm ‘my death’ and of the ‘limits of truth,’ to explore this subject, I will perhaps not speak of anything else under different names, but names matter.” (Pg. 21) Then he poses the question about which the book is written: “Is my death possible? Can we understand this question? Can I, myself, pose it? Am I allowed to talk about my death? What does the syntagm ‘my death’ mean?... I will say very quickly now why ‘my death’ will be the subject of this small aporetic oration. First, I’ll address the aporia, that is, the impossible, the impossibility, as what cannot pass or come to pass… I’ll explain myself with some help from Heidegger’s famous definition of death in ‘Being and Time’: ‘the possibility of the pure and simple impossibility for Dasein.’” (Pg. 21-23)

He observes, “A certain thinking of the POSSIBLE is at the heart of the existential analysis of death… This possibility of the possible beings together on the one hand in the sense of the virtuality or of the immanence of the future, of the ‘that can always happen at any instant,’ one MUST EXPECT IT, I am expecting it, we are expecting it, and on the other hand, the sense of ability, of the possible as that of which I am capable, that for which I have the power, the ability, or the potentiality.” (Pg. 62)

He concludes, “What we have glimpsed… I was able or may be able from now on to make of the aporia, is that if one must endure the aporia, if such is the law of all decision, of all responsibilities, of all duties without duty, and of all the border problems that ever can arise, the aporia can never simply be endured as such. The ultimate aporia is the impossibility of the aporia as such.” (Pg. 78)

Not one of Derrida’s “major works,” this book still contains some interesting writing, and will probably be of interest to those studying Derrida and his thought.
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