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Fb2 Detour and Access: Strategies of Meaning in China and Greece (Zone Books) ePub

by Francois Jullien,Sophie Hawkes

Category: Philosophy
Subcategory: Political books
Author: Francois Jullien,Sophie Hawkes
ISBN: 1890951110
ISBN13: 978-1890951115
Language: English
Publisher: MIT Press (February 17, 2004)
Pages: 432
Fb2 eBook: 1159 kb
ePub eBook: 1718 kb
Digital formats: azw lit doc txt

has been added to your Cart. And so on. He makes comparisons with ancient Greece for specific reasons to clarify what he is trying to show, which is something that flies outside the normal range of the Western sensibility/mind's radar

has been added to your Cart. He makes comparisons with ancient Greece for specific reasons to clarify what he is trying to show, which is something that flies outside the normal range of the Western sensibility/mind's radar. However, he is too sophisticated to go for that naively academic comparison that can only lead to the obvious after several hundred unnecessary pages of belabored indexing: Namely, 'A' is similar to 'B' in these many banal ways but different in those ways.

Book Publishing WeChat. has been cited by the following article: TITLE: Yeast and Its Meaning Travel in China. Sophie Hawkes, Translated. New York: Zone Books. KEYWORDS: Yeast; Meaning Travel; China. JOURNAL NAME: Chinese Studies, Vo. N., May 24, 2013. ABSTRACT: The post colonial Chinese national identity is legitimized through appropriations of Victorian literature and culture.

Sophie Hawkes (e. Zone Books (2004). Moving between the rhetorical traditions of ancient Greece and China, Jullien does not attempt a simple comparison of the two civilizations.

Translated by Sophie Hawkes. New York: Zone Books, 2000. 424 pp. Hardcover 3. 0, isbn ­8909502.

Moving between the rhetorical traditions of ancient Greece and China, Jullien attempts no simple comparison between these two civilizations.

Moving between the rhetorical traditions of ancient Greece and China, Jullien does not attempt a simple comparison of the two civilizations

I mention the two above as common resources for us to draw on throughout the course. Familiarity with them will be our common basis. The Unsayable can be the fulcrum for an ethical and political philosophy (in the manners of Benjamin, Foucault, and Agamben) as well as for an approach to the theory of knowledge (Derrida).

Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 8 x . 0 x . 7 Inches.

An exploration of the central role of indirect modes of expression in ancient China.

In what way do we benefit from speaking of things indirectly? How does such a distancing allow us better to discover―and describe―people and objects? How does distancing produce an effect? What can we gain from approaching the world obliquely? In other words, how does detour grant access? Thus begins Francois Jullien's investigation into the strategy, subtlety, and production of meaning in ancient and modern Chinese aesthetic and political texts and events. Moving between the rhetorical traditions of ancient Greece and China, Jullien does not attempt a simple comparison of the two civilizations. Instead, he uses the perspective provided by each to gain access into a culture considered by many Westerners to be strange―"It's all Chinese to me"―and whose strangeness has been eclipsed through the assumption of its familiarity. He also uses the comparison to shed light on the role of Greek thinking in Western civilization. Jullien rereads the major texts of Chinese thought―The Book of Songs, Confucius's Analects, and the work of Mencius and Lao-Tse. He addresses the question of oblique, indirect, and allusive meaning in order to explore how the techniques of detour provide access to subtler meanings than are attainable through direct approaches. Indirect speech, Jullien concludes, yields a complex mode of indication, open to multiple perspectives and variations, infinitely adaptable to particular situations and contexts. Concentrating on that which is not said, or which is spoken only through other means, Jullien traces the benefits and costs of this rhetorical strategy in which absolute truth is absent.

Comments to eBook Detour and Access: Strategies of Meaning in China and Greece (Zone Books)
Xangeo
Jullien is a rare scholar. He has succeeded in presenting things Chinese to be interesting in a way that Western sensibility can (finally) understand. Equipped with vast erudition in both traditions, Jullien sets out to question for the Western mind the significance, ramifications, and benefit of going about doing and saying things in an oblique way.
He traces the canonical texts --Lao tse's Taotejing, Lun Yu, Zhuangtse, etc-- in which this sort of sensibility and praxis took on literary form. But as the topic is not a matter of philology but sensibility, he also draws large examples of the oblique as practiced in modern China under Mao.
The author writes that he was drawn initially to Chinese studies because, for him, China represented the ultimate Other--not as theory, not as deconstruction, not as rhetoric, but as STRUCTURE. His aim in this study undertaken here is to understand the Chinese way of getting a loose grip on things so as to better "control" them -- which in "Chinese" terms would mean, letting 'them' come naturally, ineluctably into the field of one's (secret) intentions, rather than forcing them to obey one's will.
Jullien points out the difficulty involved in grasping this "Chinese" phenomenon lies in the very way in which the Western languages operate. The West's habit is to tackle whatever straight on. Arguments lead to counter-arguments, and the whole agonistic process is hinged on both sides keeping a tight grip of the objective involved in the argumentation. Gong-ans (Koans) from Ch'an (Zen) Buddhism will give you some idea of asking/answering in manner that is utterly different from the Western.
Jullien shows how the tradition of logical argumentation in the West is directly related to that of warfare, and the rise of democracy among the Greek city-states. And he contrasts this history with the Chinese "art" of war by which an adversarial situation, for example, can be obliquely manipulated to bring the adversary to a condition not of DESTRUCTION but of DESTRUCTURATION. And so on.
He makes comparisons with ancient Greece for specific reasons to clarify what he is trying to show, which is something that flies outside the normal range of the Western sensibility/mind's radar. However, he is too sophisticated to go for that naively academic comparison that can only lead to the obvious after several hundred unnecessary pages of belabored indexing: Namely, 'A' is similar to 'B' in these many banal ways but different in those ways.
No, Jullien wants to keep his distance so that he may observe and describe that which moves without a clear, calculable vector. His aim is to secure and illuminate that which makes for 'originality,' which for him is another name for none other than 'culture.'
By using China as the living model of the Other, he manages to shed light on what in the West remains exceedingly difficult to see for the Westerner. His aim therfore, ultimately, is to create the space necessary for him and the Western reader to see what is truly unfamiliar about the West itself.
Refreshing and penetrating. Highly recommended as required reading to all who wish to go beyond the shallow media-hype about globalization and understand what really is necessary for a planetary understanding of humanity's intellectual diversity.
Bliss
Good book, agree with prior reviewer. Also, prominently cited in the current global politics book "Age of the Unthinkable" by Joshua Cooper Ramos (Kissinger Institute). He argues the US tendency to tackle global political issues smack-head-on is counterproductive, and it is better to "shape the mileu" from many directions.
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