» » Japan 1945: A U.S. Marine's Photographs from Ground Zero

Fb2 Japan 1945: A U.S. Marine's Photographs from Ground Zero ePub

by Joe O'Donnell

Category: Photography and Video
Subcategory: Photo and Art
Author: Joe O'Donnell
ISBN: 0826516122
ISBN13: 978-0826516121
Language: English
Publisher: Vanderbilt University Press (April 15, 2008)
Pages: 104
Fb2 eBook: 1869 kb
ePub eBook: 1295 kb
Digital formats: mobi azw lrf mbr

has been added to your Cart. For more than twenty years, Joe O'Donnell worked for the United States Information Agency, photographing . presidents, world leaders, and unfolding history.

has been added to your Cart. When he died in 2007, controversy erupted over his mistaken claims late in life to several iconic photographs of Truman and the Kennedys. The photographs in Japan 1945 are from the 4x5 negatives in the possession of his widow.

In September 1945 Joe O'Donnell was a d Marine Corps photographer .

In September 1945 Joe O'Donnell was a d Marine Corps photographer wading ashore in Japan, then under American occupation. bombing raids in Japanese cities, including not only Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also cities such as Sasebo, one of the more than sixty Japanese cities firebombed before the atomic blasts.

Marine’s Photographs from Ground Zero, photos by Joe O'Donnell. Info from a pending documentary of Joe O'Donnell by David Tower. Japan 1945: Images of . Clark Hoyt, "Pictures Worth a Thousand Questions", New York Times, September 16, 2007. Japan 1945 : A U. S. Marine's Photographs from Ground Zero.

Japan 1945 : A U.

For more than twenty years, Joe O'Donnell worked for the United States Information Agency, photographing .

Marine photograph Joe O'Donnell documents the destruction of many cities and includes photographs of the victims that were censored at the time by . But he also captures the human face of a people beginning to look beyond the devastation.

O'DONNELL, JOE (Author) Vanderbilt University Press (Publisher). Navy war photographs, Pearl Harbor to Tokyo Harbor a collection of official . British navy planes blast airfield in japan.

Joe O’Donnell’s photos were displayed for the first time in Europe and Japan, and in 2005 they were put into a book published by Vanderbilt University Press, "Japan 1945: A . He would gain recognition around the world for his wartime photos – but the attention came with controversy that demanded the son to rise up as a protector of his father's legacy.

Some of the photographs that had been attributed to O'Donnell were actually shot by other photographers. Marine’s Photographs from Ground Zero, photos by Joe O'Donnell. A photograph of a saluting John F. Kennedy Jr. during the funeral for his father in 1963 was taken by Stan Stearns for United Press International, not by O'Donnell.

In September 1945 Joe O'Donnell was a twenty-three-year-old Marine Corps photographer wading ashore in Japan, then under American occupation. His orders were to document the aftermath of U.S. bombing raids in Japanese cities, including not only Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also cities such as Sasebo, one of the more than sixty Japanese cities firebombed before the atomic blasts. "The people I met," he now recalls, "the suffering I witnessed, and the scenes of incredible devastation taken by my camera caused me to question every belief I had previously held about my so-called enemies."

In addition to the official photographs he turned over to his superiors, O'Donnell recorded some three hundred images for himself, but following his discharge from the Marines he could not bear to look at them. He put the negatives in a trunk that remained unopened until 1989, when he finally felt compelled to confront once more what he had he had seen through his lens during his seven months in postwar Japan.

Now, for this remarkable book, seventy-four of these photographs have been assembled. The images of destruction--a panorama of Ground Zero at Nagasaki, a lone building still standing near the Aioi Bridge at Hiroshima, a fourteen-year-old burn victim lying in a coma--are, of course, wrenching beyond words. But the book includes hopeful images as well, and these are equally affecting--children playing on a road, young girls carrying their infant siblings on their backs as they go about everyday routines, geishas performing a traditional dance, Marine boots mingled with Japanese sandals outside a church entrance.

Exhibited in Europe and Japan during the 1990s, O'Donnell's photographs were first published in book form in a 1995 Japanese edition. This edition, the first to appear in the United States, includes an additional twenty photographs and will bring O'Donnell's eloquent testament to the horrors of war to an even wider audience.

Comments to eBook Japan 1945: A U.S. Marine's Photographs from Ground Zero
Braendo
This book portrays the feelings well - not just of those suffering from war or the atomic bombing but of the Marine photographer's as well. The opening pages describe well what this young US Marine has endured in his psyche and soul since 1945. Of the many unpublished photographs until now, the one that is most poignant shows a line of US Marine boots neatly lined up in front of Japanese clogs at the entrance to a church in Sasebo...bitter enemies until just weeks earlier but are now brought together in peace.
Acebiolane
Shortly after the US "army of invasion" turned into an "army of occupation," O'Donnell was in Japan taking photos. Some will seem familiar and some will seem odd, indeed (US soldiers and Japanese together, smiling). The most moving photo is of the little boy with his dead sibling strapped on his back . . . at the edge of a an area reserved for cremations . . . a little boy doing his brotherly and cultural duty, perhaps an orphan now, but in any event a little boy whose world has been destroyed around him, dealing as best he could with what confronted him (the most immediate was: how to respectfully handle the remains of his dead sibling, who was perhaps a year or so old).

Words are wonderful, but sometimes photos just "hit the mark" so much better, as here.
Diab
Wonderful book.
Venemarr
The book contains pictures which we commonly do not see over the internet. Nice!
LadyShlak
I saw this book in a museum in Nashville where there was a small exhibition of some the photos from the book. When I saw the pictures were available in this book I bought a copy for myself and my father. Some of the pix are a bit graphic but that was to be expected.
Agamaginn
Could it be that we see a photo of an 8 or 9 year old boy bringing the body of his dead baby brother to a site in Nagasaki for cremation? Could it be that this photo was taken by a 23 year old American Marine? Would it be possible that the Marine was mistaken, perhaps he misunderstood? Perhaps the baby is only sleeping. Alas, the older brother's face belies the truth as the baby's body hangs lifeless. Marine photographer Joe O'Donnell was obviously moved by many of the photos he took during his time in Japan, just after the war ended.

But it's not just bombed out cities that he shares with us. There are happier times when American GI's were talking to children, geisha and hotel maids and other slices of Japanese life that would interest most any foreigner (or perhaps today's Japanese even). We can only wonder how many other photos he has that are have not been published.

I think Japanese history is at its most interesting when it interacts (or collides) with other countries. O'Donnell shares with us images of a Japan that no longer is. Perhaps Japan never has publicly atoned for its war time actions sufficiently; but this book shows clearly that it certainly was punished sufficiently.
Hugighma
This book may not be for everybody as the pictures show a reminder of the destruction that was caused but if anything it reminds you and demonstrates how strong the Japanese character is and how resilent they are especially today after March 2011.
It's a big collection of photographs that must be passed over to generation to generation in Japan.
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