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Fb2 Our Own Sweet Sounds: A Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas ePub

by Robert Cochran

Category: Music
Subcategory: Photo and Art
Author: Robert Cochran
ISBN: 1557284423
ISBN13: 978-1557284426
Language: English
Publisher: Univ of Arkansas Pr; NULL edition (October 1, 1996)
Pages: 140
Fb2 eBook: 1694 kb
ePub eBook: 1564 kb
Digital formats: mbr txt docx lit

Cochran, Robert 1943-.

Cochran, Robert 1943-. Fayetteville : University of Arkansas Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ymusic; audio music; americana. The Archive of Contemporary Music.

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າວໂຫຼດໄວ້ອ່ານອອບລາຍ, ໝາຍບອກ, ບຸກມາກ ຫຼື ຈົດບັນທຶກໃນຂະນະທີ່ທ່ານອ່ານ Our Own Sweet Sounds: a Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas - 2nd Ed. (p.

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A rich portrait of the community that is Arkansas, manifested in song, Our Own Sweet Sounds celebrates the diversity of musical forms and music makers that have. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Our own sweet sounds. a celebration of popular music in Arkansas. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Our own sweet sounds. Published 1996 by University of Arkansas Press in Fayetteville. Popular music, History and criticism.

Some were born in Arkansas, some came in their youth and stayed, others moved on. Indeed, grounds for inclusion sometimes seem to have extended to anyone who hummed a tune while passing through the state in some month with no r 's in it.

Cochran, Robert (1996). Our Own Sweet Sounds: a Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas (2nd e. University of Arkansas Press. p. 26. Retrieved March 18, 2016. Echoes of the Ozarks, liner notes by Charles K Wolfe, County Records, 1995.

Nolan Porterfield, Robert Cochran. Published: 1 January 2006. in The Arkansas Historical Quarterly. The Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Volume 65; doi:10. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Cochran, Robert (2005). Our Own Sweet Sounds: A Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press. 58. ISBN 1-55728-793-7.

A rich portrait of the community that is Arkansas manifested in song, Our Own Sweet Sounds celebrates the diversity of musical forms and music makers that have graced the state since territorial times. Beginning with the earliest references to Quapaw and Caddo music as first reported by seventeenth-century European explorers and continuing forward to the “bizarrely named grunge bands” who will be stars tomorrow, Robert Cochran traces the music and voices that have enriched the life of the Natural State.Arkansas, many are starting to realize, was caught in a cultural crossfire of music. There were the nearby western swing influence of Tulsa, the blues of Memphis, the Louisiana Hayride of Shreveport, and the influence of Ozark music from Missouri. All of this resulted in the Arkansas cross-culture of blues, country, folk, and rock music, creating a broad spectrum of musical styles and musicians that has left an indelible impression on the Arkansas cultural scene.This new edition includes approximately seventy new artists, some of whom became famous after 1996, when the first edition was published, such as Joe Nichols, and some of whom were left out of the original edition, such as Little Willie John. The valuable “Featured Performers” section—lengthy discussions of individual artists with their photographs—is now one-third larger.This new edition, heavily illustrated, is a loving tribute to the common music that has filled local airwaves, lifted community gatherings to the level of joyous festivities, and enlivened the spirit of music lovers everywhere.
Comments to eBook Our Own Sweet Sounds: A Celebration of Popular Music in Arkansas
Dorilune
I had the pleasure of being invited to speak to Bob Cochran's University of Arkanasas students about Rice Miller AKA Sonny Boy Williamson.As a Northerner (Philadelphia, Pennsylania and Seattle. Washington) working on
Sonny Boy's biography by doing oral history collection from his friends, relatives, fellow musicians and neighbors.
Arkansas is essentially two states divided from the upper NE corner (near Memphis) to the SE (near Texarkana). The upper left corner is Appalachia and lower right corner the Arkansas delta which is connected to the northern plain of Louisiana and the SE Corner is a triangular extension of the Mississippi delta.
These are two very different regions. To oversimplify, the delta was dominated by Helena, Arkansas effectively "Arkansas' seaport" in a landlocked state. An urban area with a large black population Helena offered independent employment at Chrysler, a piano factor, and, of course, the port. Blacks could live a life outside of the white community if they did so carefully within the rules. That was mostly not true of the Mississippi delta which had larger plantations. Helena was the home of KFFA, the home of King Biscuit Time, Sonny Boy Williamson II's base for his highly influential radio show. The Helena area was a home to Robert Johnon, Robert Lockwood Jr., Robert Nighthawk, Louis Jordan and many other bluesmen. If you wanted to take the boat to Mississippi, Mr. Jenkins would take you. His son Harold became Conway Twitty. Dale Hawkins got his first drink from Sonny Boy. Levon Helm, the sole American member of The Band allegedly learn to play drums with the drums in KFFA's King Biscuit Time studio. It was a town brimming with music. In Robert Jr.'s words, "If it's good, it was here first."
Cochran's book is a good introduction to both sides of Arkansas.
Lightwind
Excellent book
Cel
This is a nicely put together, informative book which discusses the entire range of the musical heritage of Arkansas. It focuses on the state's major music contributions: blues and country music. It contains chapters that go through the history of music in the state and a number of feature profiles on famous Arkansas musicians. The book was produced in conjunction with an exhibit at an Arkansas museum. That exhibit is no longer in place, but another informative exhibit on Arkansas music is now on display at the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, Arkansas.
Ferne
It was impossible for me to get into this book. I ended up checking a book out at my local library to write a book review.
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