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Fb2 Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History ePub

by Robert Hughes

Category: History and Criticism
Subcategory: Photo and Art
Author: Robert Hughes
ISBN: 0307268446
ISBN13: 978-1407233994
Language: English
Publisher: Knopf; 1st Edition edition (November 1, 2011)
Pages: 512
Fb2 eBook: 1295 kb
ePub eBook: 1905 kb
Digital formats: rtf lit txt lrf

To Hughes, Rome was not merely a geographical location, but a cultural phenomenon, as well as a. .

To Hughes, Rome was not merely a geographical location, but a cultural phenomenon, as well as a situs of the Western imagination. Hughes, in his book, illustrates this understanding with a broad and, at times, delightfully idiosyncratic examination of Rome and its influence on the development of Western art, politics and philosophy. With the stuff that matters. With the stuff that remains.

From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive .

From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive, and deeply personal history of Rome-as city, as empire, and, crucially, as an origin of Western art and civilization, two subjects about which Hughes has spent his life writing and thinking. Starting on a personal note, Hughes takes us to the Rome he first encountered as a hungry twenty-one-year-old fresh from Australia in 1959.

Robert Hughes’s Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History offers a guided tour through that city in its many . As readers of Mr. Hughes’s earlier books well know, he is highly opinionated, especially on all matters aesthetic, and never pulls his punches.

Robert Hughes’s Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History offers a guided tour through that city in its many incarnations. We cannot make the mistake with Romans of supposing that they were refined, like the Greeks they envied and imitated, he writes near the end of this volume.

Robert Hughes examines the Eternal City through its history, politics and ar. Throughout his long career, in books about Australia, Barcelona and Goya, as well as in volumes of art history and criticism, Hughes has shown himself to be not only an eloquent writer but a brave one. He has never hesitated to voice passionate opinions or to make astute and prescient observations.

Start by marking Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Hughes earned widespread recognition for his book and television series on modern art, The Shock of the New, and for his longstanding position as art critic with TIME . Rome: A Cultural, Visual and Personal History.

Hughes earned widespread recognition for his book and television series on modern art, The Shock of the New, and for his longstanding position as art critic with TIME magazine. Known for his contentious critiques of art and artists, Hughes was generally conservative in his tastes, although he did not belong to a particular philosophical camp Contents.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Rome : A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History by.Hughes opens this authoritative, searingly smart history with his own arrival in Rome in 1958, as a wide-eyed 20-year-old from Australia.

Hughes opens this authoritative, searingly smart history with his own arrival in Rome in 1958, as a wide-eyed 20-year-old from Australia. Readers see him blissfully plunging into the life of the city, his exhilaration palpable on the page, his life-long passion for the place bursting into being.

Robert Hughes, ROME: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History, p. 10. 17 ответов 87 ретвитов 1 094 отметки Нравится. 100. 13:18 - 27 июл. 2019 г. 4 106 ретвитов.

From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive, and deeply personal history of Rome—as city, as empire, and, crucially, as an origin of Western art and civilization, two subjects about which Hughes has spent his life writing and thinking.Starting on a personal note, Hughes takes us to the Rome he first encountered as a hungry twenty-one-year-old fresh from Australia in 1959. From that exhilarating portrait, he takes us back more than two thousand years to the city's foundation, one mired in mythologies and superstitions that would inform Rome's development for centuries.From the beginning, Rome was a hotbed of power, overweening ambition, desire, political genius, and corruption. Hughes details the turbulent years that saw the formation of empire and the establishment of the sociopolitical system, along the way providing colorful portraits of all the major figures, both political (Julius Caesar, Marcus Aurelius, Nero, Caligula) and cultural (Cicero, Martial, Virgil), to name just a few. For almost a thousand years, Rome would remain the most politically important, richest, and largest city in the Western world.From the formation of empire, Hughes moves on to the rise of early Christianity, his own antipathy toward religion providing rich and lively context for the brutality of the early Church, and eventually the Crusades. The brutality had the desired effect—the Church consolidated and outlasted the power of empire, and Rome would be the capital of the Papal States until its annexation into the newly united kingdom of Italy in 1870.As one would expect, Hughes lavishes plenty of critical attention on the Renaissance, providing a full survey of the architecture, painting, and sculpture that blossomed in Rome over the course of the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries, and shedding new light on old masters in the process. Having established itself as the artistic and spiritual center of the world, Rome in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries saw artists (and, eventually, wealthy tourists) from all over Europe converging on the bustling city, even while it was caught up in the nationalistic turmoils of the Italian independence struggle and war against France.Hughes keeps the momentum going right into the twentieth century, when Rome witnessed the rise and fall of Italian Fascism and Mussolini, and took on yet another identity in the postwar years as the fashionable city of "La Dolce Vita." This is the Rome Hughes himself first encountered, and it's one he contends, perhaps controversially, has been lost in the half century since, as the cult of mass tourism has slowly ruined the dazzling city he loved so much. Equal parts idolizing, blasphemous, outraged, and awestruck, Rome is a portrait of the Eternal City as only Robert Hughes could paint it.
Comments to eBook Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History
Paxondano
Robert Hughes' brilliant revelation of Imperial Rome as a complex world chiefly remembered for its art, the only thing that comes out of ancient Rome as an exemplar of beauty and truth, changed so much of what I thought of Rome from Ancient to Modern life and practice.

A great study, the first critic to explode absurd, conventional ideas about culture and not tolerate the evaluations of the unintelligent.
Ishnsius
This is a very well written, brief introduction to Roman history, culture, and art with a delightful personal touch. Easy to read, helpful information. Don't miss the epilogue, it is an unusually candid and passionate opinion of the author, which I happen to share with the author.
Macill
There are folks who would gaze upon the Mona Lisa and say "I don't like the frame"...and walk away with nary a further thought or comment.
Just finished the book on Rome by Hughes and it was a fun ride. Gosh, to think a book covering centuries with untold numbers of facts might have some errors? And there's...gasp... some "repetition"...oh my.
I lived in Rome 40 years ago and am always fascinated by the city and it's influence on art and history. This book filled in some areas. I only wish Hughes was as funny and critical throughout the book as he was in the end part where he really lets loose on the death of culture in Rome.
And I don't agree with him always; I will always think that Rubens was one of the worst painters ever. But who cares. He goes into detail about MANY things I've always wondered about. It aint the be all, end all of books on Rome but it sure beats the hell out of many. It doesn't PRETEND to be anything other than what it is; one man's view (and love) of Rome. Sadly, Hughes died very soon after and didn't have the time to get it all perfect and tied up in a nice bow for the wanna be critics. He was on his last frail legs (literally) and suffering greatly as he did this book. I for one, loved it.
Granigrinn
Hughes was a knowledgeable and erudite scholar and his book reflects his multi-faceted knowledge of the historical and cultural centrality of Rome. To Hughes, Rome was not merely a geographical location, but a cultural phenomenon, as well as a situs of the Western imagination. Hughes, in his book, illustrates this understanding with a broad and, at times, delightfully idiosyncratic examination of Rome and its influence on the development of Western art, politics and philosophy. Reading his book is like spending an evening with a lively and intellectual raconteur.
Wen
How do you fall in love with a city? I've fallen in love with a few of them: London, Venice, Istanbul. I fell in love with London before I ever got there, so when I did get there, I don't think I even saw the London of today. It seemed as if I already knew it like the back of my hand. Everywhere I went, familiar names called out to me. Baker Street, Bloomsbury, Tower Bridge. The Clink. The Clink!? Well, that explains that. Istanbul. I'd built the Hagia Sofia right along with Guy Gavriel Kay as he was writing The Sarantine Mosaic, but it was also redolent with the magic of the crossroads, of ancient ways and closed courtyards. There wasn't a cobblestone in Istanbul that didn't remember more than I'll ever be able to forget. Venice. I knew little to nothing of Venice. I was there for less than 24 hours. At least a third of that time asleep. The rest of the time it was raining. But I fell in love the way one does with a fleeting smile from a stranger you will never see again.

Robert Hughes fell in love with Rome. He fell in love with Rome the same way I fell in love with London, with Istanbul. Through myth and legend and story:

"For a time in my adolescence - not knowing Rome in any but the sketchiest way - I longed to be a Roman expatriate ... I was nuts about the idea of Rome ..."

Most of all - and this is something that Rome has in quantities that my particular loves can only dream of - he fell in love with art:

[An elderly Jesuit from his school in Australia, who traveled to Rome from time to time] "would bring back postcards, sedulously and with obvious pleasure gleaned from their racks in various museums and churches ... : Caravaggios, Bellinis, Michaelangelos."

It was art that brought him, eventually, to Rome where, before laying eyes on so much as one Rafael, he realized that right there in front of him was the most important work of art in the entire city. The city itself.

"Nothing exceeds the delight of one's first immersion in Rome on a fine spring morning ... The enveloping light can be of an incomparable clarity, throwing into gentle vividness every detail presented to the eye. First, the color, which was not like the color of other cities I had been in. Not concrete color, not cold glass color, not the color of overburned brick or harshly pigmented paint. Rather, the worn organic colors of the ancient earth and stone of which the city is composed, the colors of limestone, the ruddy gray of tufa, the warm discoloration of once-white marble and the speckled, rich surface of the marble known as pavonazzo, dappled with white spots and inclusions like the fat in a slice of mortadella."

I remember those colors, and if I'd had Hughes' critical eye I might have seen them so. I might have fallen in love with Rome the way I fell in love with Venice. With the color of the stones and the quality of the light on a rainy day.

Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History is all of that. Hughes gives us his personal history of Rome, from the fables of Romulus, Remus, and Aeneas to the fabulous Berlusconi, skimming swiftly over politics and personalities in order to settle down every few pages with a building, a fountain, a painting, a statue. With the stuff that matters. With the stuff that remains.
Kieel
It is written in a nice way, it is easy to read, and enjoyable. But it starts as a story of Rome, then it turns to be a story of christianism, then it is the story of painting. It seems the author gets carried away by a subject he is touching and follows in that line, and then in another. In the end it is nothing integrally, and it is certainly not the story of Rome. I expected more deepness it doesn't move far beyond what we all already know.
uspeh
As in "Barcelona", Hughes has written a very engaging and well rounded account of the "Eternal City". Of particular interest is his perspective on the cultural, religious and social aspects of Rome as viewed by a contemporary art critic. I always enjoyed that about Hughes. He writes without any hesitation in expressing his opinion, which of course, is what critics do best. His work is wonderful. I recommend his autobiography as well, one of the best I ever read and "Barcelona" is facinating. Haven't read "Fatal Shores" but will soon.
Robert Hughes is an amazing writer. Rome is his last book and he is as creative, faithful to history, accurate, using a combination of his journalistic style with his profound knowledge of art and architecture, being an architect himself. His sense of humor is always there. Shame we will not be able to read any more books written by him. I am an academic and Robert Hughes is a compulsory reading for my students, always!
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