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Fb2 Tea of the Sages: The Art of Sencha ePub

by Patricia J. Graham

Category: History and Criticism
Subcategory: Photo and Art
Author: Patricia J. Graham
ISBN: 0824820878
ISBN13: 978-0824820879
Language: English
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (March 1, 1999)
Pages: 272
Fb2 eBook: 1767 kb
ePub eBook: 1641 kb
Digital formats: lrf lrf txt mbr

At sencha tea gatherings. Graham has produced a book that not only 'fills a gap, ' but is itself a lucid and elegant introduction to sencha, and indeed to the larger 'world of tea' in Japanese history that includes it and chanoyu. "Journal of Asian Studies".

At sencha tea gatherings, steeped green leaf tea is prepared in an atmosphere indebted to the humanistic values of the Chinese sages and the materialistic culture of elite Chinese society during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Although sencha once surpassed chanoyu in popularity, it is now overshadowed by chanoyu, despite the existence of more than a hundred sencha schools throughout Japan. Patricia Jane Graham.

Patricia Jane Graham. The Japanese tea ceremony is generally identified with "chanoyu" and its bowls of whipped, powdered green tea served in surroundings influenced by the tenets of Zen Buddhism. This is a study of the alternative tea tradition of "sencha", at which gatherings steeped green leaf tea is prepared in an atmosphere indebted to the humanistic values of the Chinese sages and the materialistic culture of elite Chinese society during the Ming and Qing dynasties. This illustrated volume explores sencha.

Tea of the Sages book. Subsequent chapters outline the multifaceted history of the formalization of the sencha tea ceremony, drawing upon sources such as treatises and less formal writings as well as analysis of tea gathering records, utensils and their prescribed arrangements, paintings, prints, and sencha architecture.

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This illustrated volume explores sencha's philosophy and arts from the 17th century to the end of the 20th century. Format Paperback 244 pages. Dimensions 20. 7 x 25. 5 x 1. 5mm 70. 7g. Publication date 01 Mar 1999. Publisher University of Hawai'i Press. Publication City/Country Honolulu, HI, United States.

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by Patricia J. Graham. At sencha tea gatherings, steeped green leaf tea is prepared in an atmosphere indebted to the humanistic values of the Chinese sages and the materialistic culture of elite Chinese society during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 1998. Hardback is overall in VERY GOOD condition, with a VERY GOOD. Illustrated DJ features a black, white, red photograph of a tea pot. Boards show some shelfwear and edgewear as well as signs of damp staining. This exceptionally well-illustrated volume explores sencha's philosophy and arts from the seventeenth century to the present. AS IS! Please see photos.

Tea of the Sages: the Art of Sencha (University of Hawai’i Press, 1998), 259pp. Los Angeles: Fowler Museum at UCLA, 2009, 90-105. tagaki Rengetsu and the Japanese Tea Ceremony, essay in the exhibition catalogue, Black Robe, White Mist: The Art of the Japanese Buddhist Nun Ōtagaki Rengetsu.

Characterization of aroma compositions in different Chinese congou black teas using GC-MS and GC-O combined with partial least squares regression. Flavour and Fragrance Journal, Vol. 32, Issue. Google Scholar Citations. View all Google Scholar citations for this article.

The Japanese tea ceremony is generally identified with chanoyu and its bowls of whipped, powdered green tea served in surroundings influenced by the tenets of Zen Buddhism. Tea of the Sages is the first English language study of the alternate tea tradition of sencha. At sencha tea gatherings, steeped green leaf tea is prepared in an atmosphere indebted to the humanistic values of the Chinese sages and the materialistic culture of elite Chinese society during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Although sencha once surpassed chanoyu in popularity, it is now overshadowed by chanoyu, despite the existence of more than a hundred sencha schools throughout Japan. This exceptionally well-illustrated volume explores sencha's philosophy and arts from the seventeenth century to the present. Introduced by Chinese merchants and scholar-monks, sencha first gained favor in Japan among devotees of the Chinese literati.

By the early nineteenth century, it had become popular with a wide spectrum of urban and rural residents. Some took up sencha as a subversive activity in opposition to the mandated protocol of chanoyu. Others enjoyed sencha because of its connections with elite Chinese culture, knowledge of which indicated intellectual and cultural refinement. Still others relished it simply as a fine tasting beverage. Sencha inspired painters and poets and fostered major advances within craft industries from ceramics to metalwork and basketry. Sencha aficionados, many of whom became serious connoisseurs of Chinese art and antiquities, hosted some of the earliest public art exhibitions.

Tea of the Sages opens with a chronological overview of tea in China and its transmission to Japan before situating sencha within the rich milieu of Chinese material culture available in early modern Japan. Subsequent chapters outline the multifaceted history of the formalization of the sencha tea ceremony, drawing upon sources such as treatises and less formal writings as well as analysis of tea gathering records, utensils and their prescribed arrangements, paintings, prints, and sencha architecture.

Comments to eBook Tea of the Sages: The Art of Sencha
Forcestalker
Worth my money. I recommend this book.
Wat!?
Breaking new ground while covering subjects others have glossed over,
this engaging book clarifies influences of sencha tea enthusiasts on
Japanese art. As the author unravels the historical conditions and
cultural factors related to tea aesthetics, the reader recognizes how
competing influences affected the consumption of art for elite tea
connoisseurs. These aesthetics eventually drew interest from a
broader public.
The presently more popular _chanoyu_
"whisked" tea ceremony has received much more focus than
sencha tea ceremony and practices in Western publications. With
Chinese symbolism so commonly found among Japanese art objects,
however, it would be hard to understand the quiet taste of chanoyu
fully informing the creators of Japanese artifacts-- especially since
the Edo period. Graham's book resolves that puzzle.
Ostensibly the
book is about _sencha_ "steeped" tea and its various roles
for the artistic elite of Japan since its introduction from China.
More importantly, the author captures the artistic environment of
Japan since the early Edo period. The book offers a context against
which all Japanese arts can be gauged. At times, Japanese art has
leaned toward interest in elite Chinese culture and at other times has
purposively rejected that influence. This book explains that ebb and
flow capturing not only sencha tea's influence but also the
neo-Confucian influences introduced by the Tokugawa shogunate and
enlarged by often-iconoclastic Japanese literati.
The book might be
compared to Clunas's _Superfluous Things_ text on Chinese Ming taste.
Both offer extraordinary insight to understanding Asian art by looking
from a perspective that has seldom been studied in detail. Graham is
not the first to speak of sencha tea as promoted by the Obaku sect of
Zen monks and by _bunjincha_ literati as influential to Japanese art.
She is the first to deeply explore it, put it in perspective and to
not discount its continuing influence.
As an aside to the book's
focus on tea aesthetics, it offer considerable insight to other
Japanese arts by sharing information on sencha tea enthusiasts who
have made hugely significant contributions. Ishikawa Jozan
(1583-1672), the monk Ingen (1592-1673) and the literati artist Rai
San'yo (1780-1832) are among these. Each reader will uncover for
himself individuals who may be known by other arts but were informed
in sharing sencha tea with their coterie of friends.
Other authors
have discussed sencha tea enthusiasts' influence on Japanese art.
Stephen Addiss's insightful book _The Art of Zen_ describes several
Obaku monks' influence on Japanese painting in extraordinary
detail. Katie Jones, Brian Harkins & Paul Moss (international art
dealers based in London) have published catalogs commenting on
distinctive art objects chosen by _bunjincha_ (Japanese literati who
practiced sencha tea-- especially in the 18th and 19th centuries).
They note objects that often express the Chinese sage's taste for
communion with nature. Sencha tea is discussed in the PLW Arts' book
_Tetsubin_ as many of these iron kettles were produced as sencha tea
utensils. For a broad understanding sencha tea's influence, however,
Graham's book leads the field.
Of the several chanoyu (vs. sencha
tea) books available on Japanese tea aesthetic, I would recommend Sen
Soshitsu's. They include _Chado: The Japanese Way of Tea_, _The
Japanese Way of Tea: From Its Origins in China to Sen Rikyu_,
_Chanoyu: The Urasenke Tradition of Tea_ and _Tea Life, Tea
Mind_. These are each well constructed and offer separate insights.
The overview of tea history in _Chado_ is a jewel in concisely
expressing chanoyu aesthetics, but in devoting over 60% of the book to
the detailed ritual steps of modern Urasenke practice, it may not be
your "cuppa'." The less popular (by Amazon.com sales
figures) _The Japanese Way of Tea_ is Shoshitsu's closest equivalent
to Graham's book in expressing the contributions of tea to Japanese
culture. Its chapters on Murata Juko, Takeno Joo & Sen Rikyu are
easily worth the book's price, and early tea history information is
detailed. _Chanoyu_ is a little more expensive but offers an
introduction to tea utensils with great photos that makes it warmly
appealing. _Tea Life, Tea Mind_ required bursting many of its pages
that had not been fully separated at their top by the publisher. It
offers a brief introduction to chanoyu tea aesthetics.
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