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Fb2 Landscape and Western Art (Oxford History of Art) ePub

by Malcolm Andrews

Category: History and Criticism
Subcategory: Photo and Art
Author: Malcolm Andrews
ISBN: 0192842331
ISBN13: 978-0192842336
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 3, 2000)
Pages: 256
Fb2 eBook: 1709 kb
ePub eBook: 1671 kb
Digital formats: docx mbr rtf lrf

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Landscape and Western Ar. His chapter on the Renaissance, for instance, "Subject or Setting?", considers the emergence of landscape backgrounds by examining a series of mostly unfamiliar paintings of St. Jerome, delving into everything from Catholic hagiography to contemporary hermeneutics.

Landscape and Western Art (Oxford History of Art). 0192842331 (ISBN13: 9780192842336).

The Oxford History of Art is a monographic series about the history of art, design and architecture published by Oxford . Landscape and Western Art. Malcolm Andrews. This article about a book on art history is a stub.

The Oxford History of Art is a monographic series about the history of art, design and architecture published by Oxford University Press. It combines volumes covering specific periods with thematic volumes. The history is divided into histories of Western Art, Western Architecture, World Art, Western Design, Photography, Western Sculpture, Themes and Genres, and a critical anthology of art writing. The entire work consists of over 30 volumes. Early Medieval Architecture.

Landscape and Western Art - Oxford History of Art (Paperback). Malcolm Andrews (author). The book is designed to both take stock of recent interdisciplinary debates and act as a stimulus to rethinking our assumptions about landscape. with images both celebrated and startling, he shows landscape as a contruction, a theatre in which humans act and enjoy seeing themselves ac. -Professor Richard Thomson, Edinburgh University.

Oxford History of Art. Description . The books broad sweep covers the full, rich spectrum of landscape art, including painting, gardening, panorama, poetry, photography, and art. Artistic issues are investigated in connection with Western cultural movements, and within a full international and historical context. Clear explanations and beautiful illustrations convey to the reader the idea of landscape as an experience in which everyone is creatively involved. Landscape and Western Art provides an enlightening and comprehensive critical overview of landscape art. Show more.

Landscape and Western Art. Published by Oxford University Press in 2000. Oxford History of Art Series. Malcolm Andrews is Professor of Victorian and Visual Studies at the University of Kent. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Country of Publication.

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it insists that hte making of landscape is inseperable from the history of the moment of its production, but also recognizes the intense personal experiences that motivate i. -Professor John House, Courtauld Institute of Art show more. About Malcolm Andrews.

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Comments to eBook Landscape and Western Art (Oxford History of Art)
Blacknight
This is a much more lavishly produced book than Sir Kenneth Clark's LANDSCAPE INTO ART (1949), which I have recently been reading, but much less satisfactory as a survey of landscape art. Indeed, a better title might have been "Some Questions About Landscape." They are good questions, though, including the one on his second page, where Andrews questions Clark's assumptions:

-- In Clark's title, landscape was the raw material waiting to be processed by the artist. I
Began by implying that land rather than landscape is the raw material, and that in the conversion
ofland into landscape a perceptual process has already begun whereby that material is
prepared as an appropriate subject for the painter or photographer, or simply for absorption
as a gratifying aesthetic experience. The process might, therefore, be formulated as twofold:
land into landscape; landscape into art.

Indeed, Andrews calls his first chapter "Land into Landscape." He brings a dizzying amount of erudition and reference to the question, calling on poets, photographers, philosophers, and even anthropologists to answer it. The heart of the matter, he suggests, is man's changing relationship to nature. "Landscape in art tells us, or asks us to think about, where we belong." Recently, though, that relationship has changed:

-- We don't have to imagine, with the aid of alluring images of Arcadian natural simplicity, what
it must have been like to live in Nature; we are all too aware of our dependency on Nature
now. More crucially still, we feel Nature's dependency on us. Landscape as a way of seeing
from a distance is incompatible with this heightened sense of out relationship to Nature as
a living (or dying) environment. As a phase in the cultural life of the West, landscape may
already be over.

Although there is a rough chronological flow to Andrews' subsequent chapters, his book makes no attempt to offer a history of landscape painting; rather, it tackles similar philosophical questions in roughly the order in which they became relevant. His chapter on the Renaissance, for instance, "Subject or Setting?", considers the emergence of landscape backgrounds by examining a series of mostly unfamiliar paintings of St. Jerome, delving into everything from Catholic hagiography to contemporary hermeneutics. He marshals a fascinating set of examples, from Antonello da Messina to Magritte, in "Framing the View," about the interplay between inside and outside. He is brilliant in "Astonished beyond Expression," about mountain scenery and the sublime in art. And, striking off from Turner's astonishing Snowstorm in his chapter "Nature as Picture or Process?", he revisits many of the arguments from his opening chapter, but in a more dynamic way, more closely tied to actual examples.

In short, I enjoy him most when he compares actual paintings, all of which are beautifully illustrated in the book, mostly in color, with superb close-up details prefacing each chapter. But too many of his topics—those on landscape as amenity, topography, and politics, for example—read like isolated lectures rather than chapters in a book, discussing often abstruse points in difficult language, buttressed by works that are often far outside the mainstream of landscape art. So this is by no means a text to recommend as a general introduction, although I respect the fact that he demands answers to questions which, in six years of teaching and sixty of gallery-going, I had never thought to ask.
Alsanadar
Not what I thought it was but still worth having and at used costs.
Cherry The Countess
Interesting review of landscape painting
Isha
Andrews has a unique take on the history of western landscape art. A must for your library shelf.
Ranicengi
great
Kare
This book faces two usually insurmountable hurdles - first, designing an art book in a smallish size, with the corresponding destruction of anything like a scale appreciation for larger images true size; and second, covering an enormous amount of material in a very short text.
The first remains an indefensible decision, and there's no more to be said. As for the second hurdle, Andrews does a fine job of what baseball pitchers refer to when they wiggle out of endless bases loaded situations without giving up a run - walking between the raindrops. This scholarly act of prestidigatation calls for hearty applause - usually such surveys are either too careful or too general. Happily this book is neither, but rather thought-provoking and sagacious.

Andrews success seems to lie in an acquired acceptance that for all the modern kitchen sink tools applied to art history - from Levi-Straussian anthropology to historical statistical anaylysis to Foucault's deconstructionist revisionism, there remains an abiding need for aesthetic appreciation. As one reads through the book, a sort of moderated mediatation or commentary on what is landscape, how we see it, a large array of such new thinking pops up, many contemporary responses about the nature of landscape are offered. Yet in the end Andrews falls back, and rather slyly I might add, on a sort of updated aestheticism. The distinction, and the difference Andrews makes with this old tool is surprising. The material comes across with a clarity and directedness absent from the more typical contemporary approaches to art, approaches emphasizing far more than the works of art, usually at the expense of shrinking down their full import in a maze of dubious cross-referencing.

Andrews greatest gift is confidence - he conveys a supreme sureness whatever he is writing about. In an age of relative values Andrews' certainty reverberates with an insolent disdain for doubt. (I am reminded of one critic's snickering potshot at A.L. Rowse's offhand dismissal of alternate Shakepeare author theories as pure nonsense - "for Rowse, doubt is an undiscovered country.") But Andrews, for all of that, is very much the modern, quite up on the various formalized readings and professional jargon. He has taken the measure of each of these chimeras and gone back to draw his own conclusions around an aesthetic largely free of post-modern cant. For Andrews the modern critical methodologies are but tools, used when needed, and not self-indulgence repudiating the reader in deliberately obtuse and hermetic language. And a huge bonus - Andrews is fun to read, displaying an extraordinarily adept mind; his questions and examples rarely failing to not only make his point, but develop it.

Having showered the author with praise I must point out one caveat: unlike Kenneth Clarke, who invariably seemed to put his figure on the one painting defining an age or movement, Andrews sometimes misses the obvious. A discussion of Niagara which is posed to rightly culminate in Church's great masterpiece suddenly veers off into a discussion of the Panorama, interesting enough as idea, but invariably second rate art. In deliberately thumbing an intellectual nose at Church, Andrews reveals some blind spots - he fails to understand what connects Church's greatest work with the early Wright's prairie architecture - land-gripping yet enclosed and interlocking horizontals celebrating the continent's scale. I find it strange indeed that such a book could fail to register Wright's influence and importance on our view of landscape. Next to these responses to the New World Andrew's Panoramas appear quite naked, generalized and simplistic. Although they fit nicely into his argument, he misses the chance to look beyond and over the edge, as it were. This blatant Eurocentric reading of American art continues on in a discussion of imperialist viewpoints and uninteresting observations on the over-rated Bierstadt: for Andrews the historical connections of American painting outweigh the purely artistic. The result? Even a century and half later Europeans refuse to take seriously our greatest landscape artist Church because he doesn't fit their critical template.
Despite these peccadilloes this remains a first rate book, and a must for any Art History collection.
Kiaile
Great book big help in writing essays
Great intro to the subject. Note that this book is not a basic inventory of important works so much as overview of important historical themes. More appropriate for art historian.
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