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Fb2 Westminster Abbey (Wonders of the World) ePub

by Richard Jenkyns

Category: Architecture
Subcategory: Photo and Art
Author: Richard Jenkyns
ISBN: 1861976682
ISBN13: 978-1861976680
Language: English
Publisher: Profile Books Ltd; Main edition (December 31, 2004)
Pages: 217
Fb2 eBook: 1871 kb
ePub eBook: 1363 kb
Digital formats: mobi doc lrf azw

Westminster Abbey certainly ranks as one of the top tourist draws in the world, especially for American travelers . To me, Richard Jenkyns' book reads like the transcript of a lecture. Maybe "Westminster Abbey Through the Ages" or "Westminster Abbey - Still Relevant Today?"

Westminster Abbey certainly ranks as one of the top tourist draws in the world, especially for American travelers, and those desiring a deeper profile of this London church than what a basic guidebook generally offers will do well to pay attention to this beautifully articulated essay by an Oxford professor. Exploration of the abbey's evolving functions since its origins in the thirteenth. Maybe "Westminster Abbey Through the Ages" or "Westminster Abbey - Still Relevant Today?" I can imagine him using a slideshow with it.

Wonders of the World. Westminister Abbey has fulfilled many roles over the years, from acting as a former home of Parliament to, more recently, being the venue for the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales. The author looks at these events, as well as other significant moments in the history of this unique building.

Items related to Westminster Abbey (Wonders Of The World). Westminster Abbey is the most complex church in existence. In a highly original book, classicist and cultural historian Richard Jenkyns teaches us to look at this microcosm of history with new eyes

Items related to Westminster Abbey (Wonders Of The World). Richard Jenkyns Westminster Abbey (Wonders Of The World). National cathedral, coronation church, royal mausoleum, burial place of poets, resting place of the great and of the Unknown Warrior, former home of parliament, backdrop to the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales-this rich and extraordinary building unites many functions. In a highly original book, classicist and cultural historian Richard Jenkyns teaches us to look at this microcosm of history with new eyes. Westminster Abbey is the most complex church in existence

Wonders of the world. Westminster Abbey is both an appreciation of an architectural masterpiece and an exploration of the building’s shifting meanings.

Westminster Abbey, a work of architectural genius, a place of daily worship, deploying the resources of high musical expertise, a burial . A reconstruction drawing of the Norman Abbey and Palace by Terry Ball and Richard Gem.

Westminster Abbey, a work of architectural genius, a place of daily worship, deploying the resources of high musical expertise, a burial place of kings, statesmen, poets, scientists, warriors and musicians, is the result of a process of development across the centuries, which represents the response of a monastery and later a post-Reformation church to the stimulus and challenge of its environment. In the 1040s King Edward (later St Edward the Confessor) established his royal palace.

Westminster Abbey is a large church in the city of Westminster, London, United Kingdom. Although commonly known as Westminster Abbey, its formal title is the ‘Collegiate Church of St. Peter at Westminster’. Famous for its monarchical connotations, it has been the venue for British coronations for centuries. Initially known as St. Peter’s Abbey, its association with the saint is likely to have arisen from the legend of a young fisherman who is said to have seen a vision of St. Peter on or near the site.

City Wonders' Westminster Abbey Tour explores 1,000 years at Britain's national cathedral! . Westminster Abbey and Changing of the Guard – Two Iconic Experiences, One Morning.

City Wonders' Westminster Abbey Tour explores 1,000 years at Britain's national cathedral! Includes the Horse Guards, St. James' & Changing of Guard.

Wonders of the World

Wonders of the World. Westminster Abbey is a large church located in the city of Westminster which is in turn within London in the United Kingdom. The site has been home to a religious building for well over a millenium, although construction on the current church was only begun during the reign of Henry III in 1245, partially as a site for his burial. Since the completion of the church it has been the burial site for many monarchs and notable people of England, to the extent that the South Transept is also known as Poet's Corner.

London - The Palace of Westminster and the statue of Richard .

London - The Palace of Westminster and the statue of Richard I. The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Inspired by: London Architecture. Westminster Abbey - London, England - - a beautiful interior shot of the choir stalls. Red lamp shades in Westminster Abbey, London. Westminster Abbey photo by Maurizio Fontana. Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster.

Westminster Abbey Photo by: edwin. The collegiate Church of St. Peter at Westminster is always and is commonly referred to as Westminster Abbey. It is a Gothic church in Westminster, London. 11, Creative Commons More London Famous Landmarks View Larger Map The collegiate Church of St. This church is located on the west side of the Palace of Westminster. It is where the coronation and burial ceremony of the English are usually held.

Westminster Abbey is the most complex church in existence. National cathedral, coronation church, royal mausoleum, burial place of poets, resting place of the great and of the Unknown Warrior, former home of parliament, backdrop to the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales--this rich and extraordinary building unites many functions. Westminster Abbey is both an appreciation of an architectural masterpiece and an exploration of the building's shifting meanings. We hear the voices of those who have described its forms, moods, and ceremonies, from Shakespeare and Voltaire to Dickens and Henry James; we see how rulers have made use of it, from medieval kings to modern prime ministers. In a highly original book, classicist and cultural historian Richard Jenkyns teaches us to look at this microcosm of history with new eyes. x
Comments to eBook Westminster Abbey (Wonders of the World)
Wanenai
This little book has a lot going for it. (By little, I mean that it is 5 1/4" wide by 8" tall by 1/2" deep.) It is VERY thorough in what it covers. I learned more about the comparative architecture of great cathedrals of Britain and Europe than I needed to. The historical facts are densely presented, with lots of segues. I think that almost every famous person and personage who mentioned Westminster Abbey in a diary or letter or book is quoted.

There is lots of interesting commentary. I particularly found his opinion humorous on whether or not the Stone of Scone should have been returned to Scotland.

To me, Richard Jenkyns' book reads like the transcript of a lecture. Maybe "Westminster Abbey Through the Ages" or "Westminster Abbey - Still Relevant Today?" I can imagine him using a slideshow with it. There is much information imparted and it's done so with touches of humor, but even more touches of hyperbole. An example of the latter, where he is describing the Medieval shrine with the tomb of Edward the Confessor, the raison d'etre for building the Abbey: "Like the womb, this place is secret and sacred, intimate and exotic; it is the habitation of historic memory, yet mysterious." Hmmm. I've been there, and though it was fascinating, the secret and exotic and mysterious don't seem right.

The book includes a small map of the Abbey and 26 black & white photos/illustrations. You can appreciate this book as commentary or as history. I didn't read it until after my trip, and it's the kind of account that would be nice to read before you go.

I wouldn't recommend it, though, as a reminder of your visit. For that purpose, I much more enjoyed Tony Trowles' Treasures of Westminster Abbey. It has more photos and more information on the tombs and commemoratives that I saw as I toured the Abbey.

Happy Reader
Nuadador
Professor Jenkyn's little book at only about 8 inches high is nevertheless the horse's mouth on Westminster Abbey, but Jenkyns treats the Abbey not as a rather gloomy pile of stones but as an edifice writhing with history and atmosphere that is, in essence, England. The professor knows every stone and sculpture and tomb and floor mosaic and window in the great cathedral and vividly describes many of them for you, but it's the anecdotes about the people who in whatever way contributed to the history of the Abbey and left their souls there, so to speak, that make this book such a charmer and an absolute cup of tea and a must for the person ga-ga about the Abbey. Like me.

Jenkyns relates the Abbey observations of many people over the centuries, including awed remarks by the Americans Nathaniel Hawthorne and Washington Irving, Disraeli, and even the young Princess Elizabeth at her father, George VI's coronation, which the eleven year old girl charmingly describes thusly:

"I thought it all very, very wonderful and I expect the Abbey did,too!"

Jenkyns is in no way hesitant in giving his opinion about just about everything he describes in the Abbey, and he is often hilarious. For instance, Samuel Johnson's body is buried in the Abbey in a rather humble vault, but Johnson's friends insisted on erecting a large marble statue of him which could not be placed in the Abbey because the sculpture was too big. It was therefore set up in St Paul's and Jenkyns describes the figure:

"A marble Johnson larger than life size and in something approximating to Roman dress now stands ... barefoot and bare-chested. With a scowl on his face and with some indeterminate remnant wrapped around his middle, he looks all too like someone who has just leapt from the bath to answer a wrong number."

We are treated to the episode of the 17th century diarist Samuel Pepys and Katherine of Valois. Katherine was the French wife of Henry V. During Henry VIII's time her coffin was disinterred and thrown into a niche somewhere completely unprotected. By Pepy's time the coffin had been eroded to the point where you could actually see the skeleton inside. For a shilling or two you could take a special tour for a peek and Pepys actually poked his head inside the coffin and kissed the queen on the lips, bragging about his big coup afterwards in his diary. Poor Katherine! How she would have loathed the thought of that vulgar exhibitionist kissing her!

"Westminster Abbey" is both erudite and light-heartedly serious, and is highly recommended!

P.S. The modern tourist, except by special arrangement, cannot visit the room where the shrine to Saint Edward the Confessor is. That structure, which was altered by Mary I, is simply too fragile. Edward's body is actually buried under an ancient mosaic floor some yards away in front of the high altar, but the shrine itself could be considered the heart of the Abbey and its holiest place. To see the shrine, close up and in wonderful detail here's an alternative for ya. Buy this game: "Mystery in London." This is a Hidden Object game which I describe here on Amazon. Even if the game as such does not appeal to you, chances are you'll be amused by seeing things like a hotdog suspended from the ceiling and the golden effigy of Edward I clutching a bowl of salad, and the panoramas of Westminster Abbey are breathtaking. I have never seen any images from any book that can compare in clarity and detail to the Abbey scenes in this game. You get to visit Saint Paul's, too, and those images are wonderful as well. Many more London locations are represented in the game, but the Abbey scenes and the incredible interiors of Saint Paul's blew me away. To learn more visit "Mystery in London" here on Amazon.
Lianeni
A very informative and descriptive book. As I have toured Westminister Abbey several times - it describes the Abbey in both historical and architectural integrity. The author compliments his text with high quality photos in an organized manner as if the reader is walking through the Abbey itself. Rather than buying the high end museum copy, this book is more complete with as much photo and description that brings the impact of the Abbey right into one home or office. The impact on me was to have a handy reference to the Abbey on those days which made me yearn to return and walk those quiet rows. The seller did an accurate portrayal and detail of the book and shipping was fast.
Liarienen
Westminster Abbey by Richard Jenkyns (Harvard University Press, 2005) is one of a general series of books called Wonders of the World under the general editorship of Mary Beard. Some of the other books in this series are: The Temple of Jerusalem, The Alhambra, The Parthenon, the Tomb of Agamemnon, The Colosseum, Stonehenge and the Forbidden City. Each of these books are short, Westminster Abbey is 215 pages and each is in a small compact format which makes for easy reading.
Westminster Abbey not only gives a brief history of the Abbey, but talks about its importance in cultural history. In the case of the Abbey, it went from being the mausoleum of the royal family to being the burial place of a wide variety of famous people ranging from Isaac Newton to Lawrence Olivier and the location of ceremonies important to the British people ranging from the coronation of Kings and Queens to royal weddings and even the funeral of Princess Diana. It is a definite must read for all of those interested in the importance of Westminster Abbey in British History.Westminster Abbey (Wonders of the World)
Delaath
This book is about one of the finest examples of gothic architecture, yet features sorry few digrams and/or photos. Granted, there is a lot of descriptive language, a lot of amazing description, but when the thing that is described is a visual masterpiece, words fall short.
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