» » The Only Game in Town: Baseball Stars of the 1930s and 1940s Talk About the Game They Loved (The Baseball Oral History Project) (Volume 1)

Fb2 The Only Game in Town: Baseball Stars of the 1930s and 1940s Talk About the Game They Loved (The Baseball Oral History Project) (Volume 1) ePub

by Fay Vincent

Category: Baseball
Subcategory: Outdoor Sports
Author: Fay Vincent
ISBN: 0743273184
ISBN13: 978-0743273183
Language: English
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (April 3, 2007)
Pages: 256
Fb2 eBook: 1844 kb
ePub eBook: 1822 kb
Digital formats: lit azw mobi doc

The ten ballplayers who spoke with Fay Vincent for this fascinating book bring back to life baseball from a bygone time.

The 1930s was the era of such baseball legends as Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Hank Greenberg, and Joe DiMaggio. In The Only Game in Town, pitcher Elden Auker recalls what it was like to face these sluggers, while Red Sox outfielder Dom DiMaggio remembers how he nearly ended his brother Joe's record hitting streak. The ten ballplayers who spoke with Fay Vincent for this fascinating book bring back to life baseball from a bygone time.

In this delightful book that every baseball fan will cherish, ten outstanding ballplayers remember the heyday of the game in. .

In this delightful book that every baseball fan will cherish, ten outstanding ballplayers remember the heyday of the game in the 1930s and 1940s. Warren Spahn pitched his first game in 1942 and didn't pitch again until the war ended, getting his first victory in 1946 (nonetheless he won more games than any other left-hander in history). As he recalls here, he served his country memorably in the war. Then in 1947 Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier, followed only a few months later by Larry Doby, the first African-American in the American League, who vividly describes what it felt like to be the only black ballplayer in the clubhouse - and the league.

Elden Auker - Bob Feller - Tommy Henrich - John "Buck" O'Neil - Dom DiMaggio - Johnny Pesky - Warren Spahn - Larry Doby - Ralph Kiner - Monte Irvin.

In this delightful book that every baseball fan will cherish, ten outstanding ballplayers remember the heyday of the game in the 1930s and . This volume is the third in a series drawn from his Baseball Oral History Project

In this delightful book that every baseball fan will cherish, ten outstanding ballplayers remember the heyday of the game in the 1930s and 1940s. This volume is the third in a series drawn from his Baseball Oral History Project. The previous two volumes, The Only Game in Town and We Would Have Played for Nothing, include ballplayers’ reminiscences of the 1930s and 1940s, and the 1950s and 1960s, respectively. ▲. "Sharp and lively anecdotes. We should all cherish baseball as much as Vincent does.

Then, in the 1940s, baseball underwent tremendous change. In "The Only Game in Town," pitcher Elden Auker recalls what it was like to face these sluggers, while Red Sox outfielder Dom DiMaggio remembers how he nearly ended his brother Joe's record hitting streak. Then, in the 1940s, baseball underwent tremendous change.

No current Talk conversations about this book. Showing 2 of 2. This is a fascinating collection of interviews from the former MLB commisioner with players from an era of sports (not just baseball) that is gone forever. Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 256 Vendor: Simon & Schuster Publication Date: 2007. Books Biography Celebrities. Education History US History.

Volume three of The Baseball Oral History Project done in conjunction with th.

Volume three of The Baseball Oral History Project done in conjunction with the. Baseball Hall of Fame. the book offers an exciting mix of former players, managers, and even an umpire, Bruce Froemming, and a labor leader, Marvin Miller. Vincent's premise is so simple and appealing one wonders why no one thought of it before.

Baseball has always "enjoyed" a reputation that is almost a necessity, given . Arguably the best example of the oral history genre is THE GLORY OF THEIR TIMES, a 1966 collection of interviews by the late.

Baseball has always "enjoyed" a reputation that is almost a necessity, given its relatively slow pace. There is plenty of time to think, to talk. It's the same with books such as THE ONLY GAME IN TOWN, a collection of reminiscences of 10 players who played mostly in the years surrounding World War II. The athletes include Elden Auker, Tommy Henrich, John "Buck" O'Neil, Dom DiMaggio, Johnny Pesky, Warren Spahn, Larry Doby, Ralph Kiner, Bob Feller and Monte Irvin; Spahn and Doby have since passed away. Arguably the best example of the oral history genre is THE GLORY OF THEIR TIMES, a 1966 collection of interviews by the late Lawrence Ritter.

In this insightful but uneven book, Schmidt, the great Philadelphia Phillies third baseman and three-time National League most valuable player, surveys the state of today's game.

The Baseball Oral History Project: Volume 1. By Fay Vincent. In this insightful but uneven book, Schmidt, the great Philadelphia Phillies third baseman and three-time National League most valuable player, surveys the state of today's game. He recaps his own career as a way of jump-starting discussions on hot-button topics like free agency and players' salaries. But this leads to brisk and superficial arguments: "Free agency has been great for Gary Sheffield.

The 1930s was the era of such baseball legends as Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Hank Greenberg, and Joe DiMaggio. In The Only Game in Town, pitcher Elden Auker recalls what it was like to face these sluggers, while Red Sox outfielder Dom DiMaggio remembers how he nearly ended his brother Joe's record hitting streak. Then, in the 1940s, baseball underwent tremendous change. First came World War II, and stars such as Bob Feller and future star Warren Spahn -- both among the ten ballplayers who discuss their playing days in this book -- left the game to serve their country. When the war ended, integration came to baseball. Jackie Robinson was soon followed by other outstanding African-American ballplayers, including Larry Doby and Monte Irvin, both of whom recall their pioneering experiences in Major League Baseball. Buck O'Neil describes scouting and coaching the next generation of African-American ballplayers and helping them make it into the major leagues. Johnny Pesky and Tommy Henrich recall great Red Sox-Yankees rivalries, but from opposite sides, while Ralph Kiner remembers his remarkable ten-year stretch as the most feared home-run hitter of his day. The ten ballplayers who spoke with Fay Vincent for this fascinating book bring back to life baseball from a bygone time. Their stories make The Only Game in Town a must-have for all baseball fans.
Comments to eBook The Only Game in Town: Baseball Stars of the 1930s and 1940s Talk About the Game They Loved (The Baseball Oral History Project) (Volume 1)
MisterQweene
This book is basically a compilation of interviews that Vincent did with baseball starts of the 1930s and 1940s. Nothing more, nothing less. They can get a bit choppy at times, but overall I thought the stories were tremendous. I'm a big baseball fan, and would recommend this book to similar people.
Conjuril
An oral history that catches the ethos of an earlier time in a most wonderful and unspoiled manner. Vincent's editing never disrupts the beauty or the simplicity of memories that flow from the passions of the men who played in the 30's and 40's. This is a work that ranks with those of Honig and Ritter. Easy read. An essential for the baseball library. An absolute delight.
Gosar
THIS IS ABOUT HOW BASEBALL WAS PLAYED DURING THE 1930'3 AND 40'S ACCORDING TO 10 OF THE TOP PLAYERS IN THAT ERA. SOME OF THE PLAYERS INTERVIEWED ARE BOB FELLER, WARREN SPAHN, RALPH KINER AND BUCK O'NEIL. THE AUTHOR DOES A GOOD JOB AND MAKES THESE INTERVIEWS BOTH ENTERTAINING AND INTERESTING. I REALLY ENJOYED THIS AND SUGGEST THIS FOR FANS WHO ARE FAMILIAR WITH OR WHO ARE INTERESTED DURING AN ERA WHEN BASEBALL WAS A GAME AND NOT A BUSINESS. WHEN PLAYERS PLAYED FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME SOMETHING TODAYS GREEDY AND SELF CENTERED PLAYERS KNOW NOTHING ABOUT.
Tam
In the introduction former baseball commissioner Fay Vincent, and author of this book, states he got the idea of this book from listening to the interviews that Larry Ritter conducted with old ballplayers who played at the turn of the 20th century. Ritter wanted to do these interviews before that generation of ballplayers died. Vincent then states he wanted to do interviews of players from the era of the '30's and '40's, and hopes this book is the first of several volumes of interviews of former players. Apparently Vincent isn't aware that Donald Honig did three books of this same type entitled "Baseball When The Grass Was Real", "Baseball Between the Lines", and "The Dugout." You will probably find the book to be okay if you haven't read other books on any of these players. but I did find it awfully annoying when the direct words of the player being interviewed were used. Examples include incorrect grammar (was instead of were), and repeating a set of three words over again as people may do at times when speaking to another person. This I found to be very unnecessary and annoying. Please don't tell me it's more authentic with the direct words of the player. Also, what is found in this book can be found in several other books on baseball history. Finally, the New York Yankee scout (who signed Mantle) is Tom Greenwade, not Tom Greenway as listed in the book (page 96) and index. I have to admit to being disappointed, and I really didn't find anything new here. I'm being generous with three stars.
Umsida
I got this book for my dad for the holidays, and by the next day he had already read half of it. He absolutely could not put it down. I'm so happy with this purchase because the stories in this book make him smile. I can't wait to buy the next volume for his birthday!
catterpillar
Former baseball commissioner Fay Vincent provides an interesting oral history of baseball by recording the words of ten of the game's top players. The players include stars of the big leagues (Dom DiMaggio, Johnny Pesky, Bob Feller, etc) one Negro Leaguer (Buck O'Neill), and two that played in both venues (Larry Doby, Monte Irvin). Each player spoke into a tape recorder, and their words are printed here, apparently verbatim. I liked the memories and insights from this diverse group of stars, not all of whom were educated or articulate. One wonders how many of today's pitchers follow Warren Spahn's method of stretching his arm between starts. I'm glad these interviews were conducted; Doby and Spahn both passed away in 2003, while at this writing the others range in age from 83 (Ralph Kiner) to 95 (Eldon Auker).

Some note that Lawrence Ritter (GLORY OF THEIR TIMES) and Donald Honig (IMAGE OF THEIR GREATNESS) wrote similar books about baseball's past, and perhaps in better fashion. Still, this version is a readable and interesting first-person look at baseball.
Whitemaster
A very well done book. It is a transcription of conversations with players from the 1930s and 40s including those who came over from the Negro League. About the only downside is that Fay is faithful to the exact words used by the players instead of cleaning up some of the grammar. It was wonderful to get perspective from greats such as Bob Feller, and next level tiers such as Dom Dimmagio.
This is a book that any baseball fan needs to read. It makes us appreciate the game back when it was pure. When the game was truly the national pasttime, and the players such as Monte Irvin, Ralph Kiner, and so many others played a game they loved. Yes, it was a business, but it was also a game, which it's not anymore. It's a sport, no more, no less.

The stories of Ted Williams, Joe DiMaggio, Satchel Paige, Jimmie Foxx, Casey Stengel, and the ones we love reading about are there, along with Warren Spahn and Tommy Heinrich, Bob Feller, and Larry Doby. The discuss their lives, teammates, and what made baseball great.

I wish I could give this more than five stars.
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