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Fb2 Rights Talk: The Impoverishment of Political Discourse ePub

by Mary Ann Glendon

Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Other
Author: Mary Ann Glendon
ISBN: 0029118239
ISBN13: 978-0029118238
Language: English
Publisher: Free Press; Reprint edition (July 30, 1993)
Pages: 236
Fb2 eBook: 1133 kb
ePub eBook: 1313 kb
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1 New York: The Free Press. Writing with energy, elegance, style, and verve, Glendon offers her diagnosis of one unappreciated component of the current malaise: the impoverishment of our political discourse by shrill, divi-sive dialogue

1 New York: The Free Press. Writing with energy, elegance, style, and verve, Glendon offers her diagnosis of one unappreciated component of the current malaise: the impoverishment of our political discourse by shrill, divi-sive dialogue. In her view, our nation is afflicted with an excessive preoccupation with individual rights and with the demands that these rights entitle their holders to make on other citizens, often through litigation (pp. 44-45).

Mary Ann Glendon was born on October 7, 1938, in Pittsfield, Mass. and graduated from the University of Chicago with both . and Master of Comparative Law degrees. She has worked as a criminal defender, a civil rights attorney, and is the Learned Hand Professor of Law at Harvard University. Glendon writes frequently on scholarly matters of the law. In Rights Talk: The Impoverishment of Political Discourse, she presents examples of the talk behind laws and rights of citizens, and the actual actions.

Political speech in the United States is undergoing a crisis. Start by marking Rights Talk: The Impoverishment of Political Discourse as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Impoverishment of Political Discourse. THE FREE PRESS A Division of Simon & Schuster Inc. 1230 Avenue of the Americas New York, .

Rights Talk by Glendon is really well done. I read across the political spectrum and Glendon is conservative. Her insightful explanation as to the perception of rights, its evolution, et. gives a clear view of where we are now. Good read. 4 people found this helpful.

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Mary Ann Glendon, professor of Law at Harvard University, one of the most .

book by Mary Ann Glendon. Political speech in the United States is undergoing a crisis. Mary Ann Glendon, professor of Law at Harvard University, one of the most eminent scholars in contemporary America, in this book writes about the legal cultural tradition of the United States, up until the actual absolutization of the rights claim, sign of a rising individualism that is part of the rich US tradition but that it's a serious challenge for our actual.

Political speech in the United States is undergoing a crisis

Publisher Description.

Political speech in the United States is undergoing a crisis. Glendon's acclaimed book traces the evolution of the strident language of rights in America and shows how it has captured the nation's devotion to individualism and liberty, but omitted the American traditions of hospitality and care for the community.
Comments to eBook Rights Talk: The Impoverishment of Political Discourse
Kikora
Harvard's Mary Ann Glendon provides one of those rare insights into why we are the way we are, exposing what is patently aberrant when externally viewed, axiomatic by force of habit, and an educational system catering to consumerism. Central is our language, that way to the soul of how we view our world and us in it, through rights talk. American rights talk is stark, simple, polarizing, legalistic, excessively bestowing the rights label with exaggerated insular absoluteness of hyper-individualism expressed as unbounded wants and desires with utter silence on personal, civic or collective responsibilities (that's a mouthful). Nearly every social controversy is now framed as a clash of absolute rights with self-correction denied and compromise unlikely in our winner take all arrangement. What Hamilton said would happen, happened, and with a vengeance. While the Bill Of Rights (he opposed) was to clarify what the federal government would not do, it has been transformed as a route to governmental expansion via what government must do for us. "Rights" are now paramount and the touchstone of legitimacy. (Just listen to the list of rights we never knew we had in our current political debates.)

Glendon illuminates a turn taking place in the 50's when the principle focus of the Court was not personal liberty but the division of authority and allocation of power between States and the national government. Congressional legislation (subject to the people's will) during the New Deal shifted to the Supreme Court (protected from the people's will) and their creation of new or expanded rights with the stroke of a pen - a fundamental swing away from the people, and in the process of our governance. The "test case" became a replacement for time consuming political engagement. The results of which might go either way depending on the Court's composition - liberal or conservative - a tyranny of nine instead of one that Madison warned against as a tyranny nonetheless.

Glendon elucidates our legal system's inability to extrapolate long-term effects of their decisions, or recognizing entities other than individuals, corporations and States, i.e. communities are invisible. Not infrequently, opinions of justices sound as if from another galaxy not bothered by common sense. America's emphasis of Locke's property language is contrasted with Europe's Rousseauian (though equally idyllic) perspective (Rousseau wasn't any more complete than Locke), making all the difference, with Europe often appearing a good deal more rationally conditional than absolutist America. Interestingly, ideas in political philosophy can be seen to display creative inventiveness not unlike that found in science and technology, allowing new results from old principles or discoveries of alternate ways to interpret them. And like technology's creation of penicillin or the atomic bomb, outcomes are not always positive. To this reader it was a shock to find rights do not deserve the altitude they've acquired in America. An excellent book every politician and lawyer should take intravenously, before they bury us all.
LONUDOG
Rights Talk by Glendon is really well done. I read across the political spectrum and Glendon is conservative. Her insightful explanation as to the perception of rights, its evolution, etc., gives a clear view of where we are now. Good read.
Freighton
Good
Virn
needed for school
ℓo√ﻉ
The most frequent excuse for not registering to vote in Illinois is to avoid jury duty. It's doubtful, however, that those same people would be willing to forfeit their right to be tried by a jury of their peers. This contradiction reflects the state of American civic culture -- a strong sense of entitlement and a weak sense of obligation.

Mary Ann Glendon falls into the communitarian school of social thinkers who believe we need to strengthen communities and families, and balance rights with a greater willingness to shoulder responsibilities.

American rights talk is both absolutist and expansive. That is, we tend to speak as if our rights have no limits -- even though they all do -- and we like to create new rights. Rights talk, Glendon argues, is seldom concerned with corresponding responsibilities or the general welfare. A healthy society needs a better balance.

Americans view the rights-bearer as a lone, autonomous individual, rather than as an essentially social being inextricably related to family and community. The issue about mandatory helmet laws for motorcyclists is a case in point. "The independent individualist, helmetless and free on the open road, becomes the most dependent of individuals in the spinal injury ward," writes Glendon.

In the 19th Century, Americans liked to speak of property rights in absolute terms. By the late 20th Century, we talked about the right to privacy as unlimited. The problem is that the farther one right is extended, the more likely it is to come into conflict with other rights. Absolutism also undermines compromise and balancing rights with competing values.

Robert Putnam in Bowling Alone exhaustively demonstrated the decline of civic capital since the 1960s. Our relatively low concern for the public good helps account for the USA having one of the lowest voter participation rates in the world. Glendon is right about the need to strengthen community. Our challenge is how to do it.
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