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Fb2 The Monkey as Mirror: Symbolic Transformations in Japanese History and Ritual ePub

by Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney

Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Other
Author: Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney
ISBN: 0691094349
ISBN13: 978-0691094342
Language: English
Publisher: Princeton University Press; First Edition edition (November 21, 1987)
Pages: 288
Fb2 eBook: 1236 kb
ePub eBook: 1442 kb
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During early periods of Japanese history the monkey's nearness to the . Limitations and Organization of the Book. Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney, a native of Japan, is Vilas Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

During early periods of Japanese history the monkey's nearness to the human-animal boundary made it a revered mediator or an animal deity closest to humans. Later it became a scapegoat mocked for its vain efforts to behave in a human fashion. 17. The Monkey as Metaphor for the Japanese. Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney, a native of Japan, is Vilas Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Among her works are Illness and Healing among the Sakhalin Ainu: A Symbolic Interpretation and Illness and Culture in Contemporary Japan: An Anthropological View (both Cambridge).

Ohnuki-Tierney has been working on the question of power of symbols and . The Monkey as Mirror: Symbolic Transformations in Japanese History and Ritual. Princeton University Press.

Ohnuki-Tierney has been working on the question of power of symbols and its absence in political spaces since the mid-1980s. Her most recent works began as a study of symbolism of cherry blossoms and their viewing in relation to Japanese identities and led to an exploration of the cherry blossom symbol as a major trope utilized to both encourage and aestheticize sacrifice for the country during its military period  .

Ohnuki-Tierney, Emiko. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The Monkey as Mirror book. by. Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney. During early periods of Japanese history the monkey's nearness to the human-animal boundary made it a revered mediator or an animal deity closest to humans.

Similar books and articles. Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney, Rice as Self: Japanese Identities Through Time. The Monkey and the Inkpot: Natural History and Its Transformations in Early Modern China

Similar books and articles. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1993. Don Handelman - 1998 - Semiotica 119 (3/4):403-425. The Monkey and the Inkpot: Natural History and Its Transformations in Early Modern China. Fa-ti Fan - 2010 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 101:883-884. Richard Gardner - 1994 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 21 (1):118-120.

During early periods of Japanese history the monkey's nearness to the human-animal boundary made it. .

During early periods of Japanese history the monkey's nearness to the human-animal boundary made it a revered mediator or an animal deity closest to humans. This work presents a tripartite study of the monkey metaphor. Country of Publication.

Yoram S. Carmeli, Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney. Published: 1 January 1991. Poetics Today, Volume 12; doi:10.

Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney, a native of Japan, is Vilas Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The Monkey as Mirror : Symbolic Transformations in Japanese History and Ritual. This tripartite study of the monkey metaphor, the monkey performance, and the 'special status' people traces changes in Japanese culture from the eighth century to the present. by Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney.

She is the author of a number of books in English and Japanese, most recently Rice as Self: Japanese Identities through Time; The Monkey as Mirror: Symbolic Transformations in Japanese History and Ritual; and Illness and Culture in Contemporary Japan. Библиографические данные. Kamikaze, Cherry Blossoms, and Nationalisms: The Militarization of Aesthetics in Japanese History. University of Chicago Press, 2010.

This tripartite study of the monkey metaphor, the monkey performance, and the 'special status' people traces changes in Japanese culture from the eighth century to the present. During early periods of Japanese history the monkey's nearness to the human-animal boundary made it a revered mediator or an animal deity closest to humans. Later it became a scapegoat mocked for its vain efforts to behave in a human fashion. Modern Japanese have begun to see a new meaning in the monkey--a clown who turns itself into an object of laughter while challenging the basic assumptions of Japanese culture and society.

Comments to eBook The Monkey as Mirror: Symbolic Transformations in Japanese History and Ritual
DABY
The 'Monkey as Mirror' is a book written ethno-historically dealing with social-cultural anthropology. The main concerns of the text are "the relationship between culture and history on the one hand and that between history and ritual/performance on the other". The main concern of the book is to examine the cultural progression of the Japanese. In order to analyze this, the focus resides on the monkey performance and Special Status People (SSP) posing as symbolization and transformation as a result of changes in Japanese society.
The text is very well set out and follows strategic guidelines as presented in the contents, this effectively links the book and ties the reader into its structure. As well as having a colorful and imaginative title, carrying with it the mischievousness associated with the macaque/baboon image, use has been made of folklore and myth in order to add entertaining and comical enjoyment to the text. This is also carried throughout the t! ! ext by the authors excitement when giving descriptions of monkey performances and training sessions. Footnotes are used to illustrate details of such things as ceremonies, rituals, customs, myths and legends as required. This allows the reader to identify with the cultural history of the Japanese whilst simultaneously offering explanation to non-Japanese readers. This allows for a better understanding of the rituals presented in the text and opens up an avenue of further reading for concepts brushed upon but not discussed in detail by the author. The use of identifiable language throughout the text allows access to a broad readership base. As the text unfolds self-criticism is made, making one feel as though the author is being a little more honest and reliable than we may necessarily believe.
The author perceives that in modern day Japan religious meanings of the monkey performance have remained, but the sense for the need of ritual has been lost. The crux of the text is th! ! at the monkey continues to be seen as a trickster, yet new ! notions of the 'cultured monkey' have arisen endorsing an attitude representing progressive, modern Japan: "speak out, examine, and listen". Ohnuki-Tierney presents the impression that emphasis has now been placed on the Japanese self as the 'cultured monkey' and others as 'tricksters'. The text illustrates the three 'cultured monkeys' as representative of contemporary Japanese society, covering the belief that the monkey represents a confronting force for contemporary society, questioning and mocking its very framework.
Showing the monkey as a group animal associating it with the yin-yang (reflexive) notion and view of the Japanese as 'self' and foreigners as 'others', the monkey becomes a culturally important animal. The author expands upon this by looking at duality in the reflexive nature of Japanese society. A whole chapter is devoted to this principle assuming the reader to have no knowledge of the concept. Yet when looking at the representations of monkey p! ! erformance Ohnuki-Tierney focuses upon Tokyo, which emphasizes the monkey as a full-blown trickster. This then tends to lead one to believe that for the sake of the author's argument Ohnuki-Tierney may be exhibiting bias, however this may just have been a personal preference.
Ultimately Ohnuki-Tierney has attempted to understand and present Japanese culture by choosing to examine monkey symbolism and performance, along with meanings of the SSP. The final chapter is a good summary and conclusion presenting an overall and succinct linkage of events and arguments with views and descriptions of previous chapters. It also looks over various meanings attributed to the monkey and SSP, as well as looking at the ethno-historical contexts in which these occurred.
Yanki
The 'Monkey as Mirror' is a book written ethno-historically dealing with social-cultural anthropology. The main concerns of the text are "the relationship between culture and history on the one hand and that between history and ritual/performance on the other". The main concern of the book is to examine the cultural progression of the Japanese. In order to analyze this, the focus resides on the monkey performance and Special Status People (SSP) posing as symbolization and transformation as a result of changes in Japanese society.
The text is very well set out and follows strategic guidelines as presented in the contents, this effectively links the book and ties the reader into its structure. As well as having a colorful and imaginative title, carrying with it the mischievousness associated with the macaque/baboon image, use has been made of folklore and myth in order to add entertaining and comical enjoyment to the text. This is also carried throughout the t! ! ext by the authors excitement when giving descriptions of monkey performances and training sessions. Footnotes are used to illustrate details of such things as ceremonies, rituals, customs, myths and legends as required. This allows the reader to identify with the cultural history of the Japanese whilst simultaneously offering explanation to non-Japanese readers. This allows for a better understanding of the rituals presented in the text and opens up an avenue of further reading for concepts brushed upon but not discussed in detail by the author. The use of identifiable language throughout the text allows access to a broad readership base. As the text unfolds self-criticism is made, making one feel as though the author is being a little more honest and reliable than we may necessarily believe.
The author perceives that in modern day Japan religious meanings of the monkey performance have remained, but the sense for the need of ritual has been lost. The crux of the text is th! ! at the monkey continues to be seen as a trickster, yet new ! notions of the 'cultured monkey' have arisen endorsing an attitude representing progressive, modern Japan: "speak out, examine, and listen". Ohnuki-Tierney presents the impression that emphasis has now been placed on the Japanese self as the 'cultured monkey' and others as 'tricksters'. The text illustrates the three 'cultured monkeys' as representative of contemporary Japanese society, covering the belief that the monkey represents a confronting force for contemporary society, questioning and mocking its very framework.
Showing the monkey as a group animal associating it with the yin-yang (reflexive) notion and view of the Japanese as 'self' and foreigners as 'others', the monkey becomes a culturally important animal. The author expands upon this by looking at duality in the reflexive nature of Japanese society. A whole chapter is devoted to this principle assuming the reader to have no knowledge of the concept. Yet when looking at the representations of monkey p! ! erformance Ohnuki-Tierney focuses upon Tokyo, which emphasizes the monkey as a full-blown trickster. This then tends to lead one to believe that for the sake of the author's argument Ohnuki-Tierney may be exhibiting bias, however this may just have been a personal preference.
Ultimately Ohnuki-Tierney has attempted to understand and present Japanese culture by choosing to examine monkey symbolism and performance, along with meanings of the SSP. The final chapter is a good summary and conclusion presenting an overall and succinct linkage of events and arguments with views and descriptions of previous chapters. It also looks over various meanings attributed to the monkey and SSP, as well as looking at the ethno-historical contexts in which these occurred.
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