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Fb2 The Spoils Of Poynton ePub

by Henry James

Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Author: Henry James
ISBN: 1419183362
ISBN13: 978-1419183362
Language: English
Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 17, 2004)
Pages: 168
Fb2 eBook: 1656 kb
ePub eBook: 1400 kb
Digital formats: rtf mobi lrf rtf

The Spoils of Poynton is a novel by Henry James, first published under the title The Old Things as a serial in The Atlantic Monthly in 1896 and then as a book in 1897.

The Spoils of Poynton is a novel by Henry James, first published under the title The Old Things as a serial in The Atlantic Monthly in 1896 and then as a book in 1897. This novel traces the shifting relations among three people and a magnificent collection of art, decorative arts, and furniture arrayed like jewels in a country house called Poynton

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. The Spoils of Poynton. A typically Jamesian farce with a focus on social snobbery.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Henry James (1843-1916), born in New York City, was the son of noted religious philosopher Henry James, S. and brother of eminent psychologist and philosopher William James. He spent his early life in America and studied in Geneva, London and Paris during his adolescence to gain the worldly experience so prized by his father. He lived in Newport, went briefly to Harvard Law School, and in 1864 began to contribute both criticism and tales to magazines.

LibriVox recording of The Spoils of Poynton, by Henry James. Read by Nicholas Clifford. The recently widowed Adela Gereth, a lover of beauty and passionate collector of fine objects, strikes up a friendship with the young Fleda Vetch, when both of them find themselves guests in the tasteless house of the Brigstock family. Mrs. Gereth fears that her son Owen, an honorable but somewhat unimaginative young man, may take up with one of the Brigstock girls, and indeed he presently announces his engagement to Mona, the eldest daughter.

Henry James was named for his father, a prominent social theorist and lecturer, and was the younger brother of the pragmatist philosopher William James. The young Henry was a shy, book-addicted boy who assumed the role of quiet observer beside his active elder brother. They were taken abroad as infants, were schooled by tutors and governesses, and spent their preadolescent years in Manhattan.

The Spoils of Poynton book. instead of the smooth one. Henry James must have been in a grey mood the day he decided to insert me into his Poynton tale

The Spoils of Poynton book. Henry James must have been in a grey mood the day he decided to insert me into his Poynton tale. I've read his notes for the story and I'm fully aware that I was an afterthought, not part of the original plan. He needed someone to act as a go-between, and so, sadly for me, I was brought into existence.

Генри Джеймс The Spoils of Poynton. Ah, really?" cried Fleda, achieving a radiance of which she was secretly proud. It was the furniture she wouldn't give up; and what was the good of Poynton without the furniture? Besides, the furniture happened to be his, just as everything else happened to be. The furniture-the word, on his lips, had somehow, for Fleda, the sound of washing-stands and copious bedding, and she could well imagine the note it might have struck for Mrs. Gereth.

The Spoils of Poynton Текст. This instant perception that the place had been dressed at the expense of Poynton was a shock: it was as if she had abruptly seen herself in the light of an accomplice

The Spoils of Poynton Текст. This instant perception that the place had been dressed at the expense of Poynton was a shock: it was as if she had abruptly seen herself in the light of an accomplice. The next moment, folded in Mrs. Gereth's arms, her eyes were diverted; but she had already had, in a flash, the vision of the great gaps in the other house.

The Spoils of Poynton" is a novel by Henry James, first published under the title "The Old Things" as a serial in "The Atlantic Monthly" in 1896 and then as a book in 1897

The Spoils of Poynton" is a novel by Henry James, first published under the title "The Old Things" as a serial in "The Atlantic Monthly" in 1896 and then as a book in 1897. This half-length novel describes the struggle between Mrs. Gereth, a widow of impeccable taste and iron will, and her son Owen over a houseful of precious antique furniture. Widow Adela Gereth tells the sensitive and tasteful Fleda Vetch that she's afraid her son Owen will marry the coarse Mona Brigstock. Owen soon becomes engaged to Mona and wants to take over Poynton, the family home filled with Mrs. Gereth's carefully collected furniture and other art objects.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Comments to eBook The Spoils Of Poynton
Umsida
Whoever thought Henry James could write a really funny book? It may not be Catch-22, or Enderby, or Lolita, but it reeks and drips with irony and has genuine laugh-out-loud scenes, especially starring Mrs. Gereth, who is blunt about pandering Fleda to her feckless son. Spare and incisive, with only a disagreeable surfacing now and then of James' 'late' style (ponderous and unnecessarily intricate, making you read over sentences five times to extract their meaning), This is the first book he wrote after the excruciating failure of the play Guy Domville (see Leon Edel's bio, if you can stand cringing at the way James was treated) and he apparently said to himself: "I will show these cretins how a real writer writes." You cannot go wrong if you like James.
Flower
Henry James' Spoils of Poynton is a jewel--quite a prize indeed. His shorter fiction and essays are among his most balanced efforts. He's a writer who is constantly obsessed with polishing his work. And the larger the piece the more cumbersome and tedious that polishing often becomes for him. This small work with few of the devisive distractions that seem to haunt his major projects, contains some his crispest and most telling dialogue. And you may feel in certain succinct instances that you have somehow entered profoundly into the pysche of that character for a moment Here, at least on those rare occasions, James' subtlety and charm counterbalance his observation of human cruelty with all the poise the author may have wished..
Gralsa
19th century literature...either like it or not....but if you like to read , try it
Maucage
James writing broad satire? Who would have thought!
Quashant
SPOILS is not one of James' triumphs. It isn't one of his yarns that bears rereading, unlike a half-dozen others. If you're a completist, you'll want to read it; otherwise, stick with PORTRAIT OF A LADY, THE BOSTONIANS, THE AMBASSADORS and the handful of obvious others.
Mr Freeman
There are no spoilers for The Spoils of Poynton in these comments, but there are spoilers for The Ambassadors and Portrait of A Lady.

I have great respect and admiration for Henry James, but this is not one of his best efforts. A pretty good novel, but not one of his best efforts.

The plot is set in motion by the following events: a mother and father have spent their lives collecting beautiful objects, which are housed in their dwelling at Poynton. They have a son who is a kind of jolly, well-meaning English upper class bloke, insensitive to the beauty of the objects. The father dies and, under English law, the son inherits everything. The son falls in love with a girl very much like himself. His mother fervently wants control of the objects and befriends another girl, our heroine, with the sensitivities the mother would like to see in a daughter-in-law who would cherish the objects.

The events and emotional entanglements that follow are quite tense. This book has a more active plot, more twisting, and turning, than you usually associate with Henry James. There is something closer to a physical love scene than I can recall in any other of his novels.

The ending is a bit of a deus ex machina.

Only the mother and our heroine, whose name is Fleda Vetch, are fully characterized. Henry James lavishes all his powers of witty, incisive, allusive, and complicated character description on these two. The other characters are cursory. The mother is energetic, aggressive, self-centered, and rather likable for her down-to-earth focus. Fleda is one of those self-defeating morally punctilious James protagonists, who snatches self-justification from the jaws of satisfaction time and again.

The prose is James' elaborate middle style, fun to follow but not easy, building up characters and situations with a million smart observations, but he is too fond of calling characters "magnificent" or 'luminous'.

I say I'm fond of Henry James, but I find myself angry with him when his protagonists damn themselves to mediocrity at the moment a rich life is within their grasp over what seems to me ridiculous moral compunctions. Lambert Strether in The Ambassadors could perfectly well settle down with Maria Gostrey in Paris to a rich and meaningful life if he didn't have a painful horror of having profited from others' mistakes. Isabel Archer in Portrait of a Lady could divorce her husband and have a passionate marriage with Casper Goodwood, if she would drop the obligation to suffer for her own mistakes. It is a measure of James greatness that I care enough about these people to be really angry with him.

Most of the characters of this sort in James are scrupulously honest; Fleda is a variation. She lies all the time. She is chronically dishonest with the other characters and with herself, but for the highest of motives, or at any rate the most self-defeating.

James aficionados will know that he is fond of dimly significant names. His notebooks are replete with several lists of such names and musings on what a person with such and such a name would be like. I understand about "Fleda" - she flees, literally running away from an admirer at one point, as does Isabel Archer. But "vetch" is an agricultural product like alfalfa that is fed to cattle and sheep. Fleda is a pert little thing, not in the least bovine or ovine.
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