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Fb2 Lady Anna ePub

by Anthony Trollope

Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Author: Anthony Trollope
ISBN: 0486246698
ISBN13: 978-0486246697
Language: English
Publisher: Dover Pubns (September 1, 1984)
Pages: 374
Fb2 eBook: 1905 kb
ePub eBook: 1271 kb
Digital formats: mobi doc azw docx

This is yet another novel by Anthony Trollope about a young woman of marrying age who is pressured to marry for wealth, while yearning for the love of a simpler man. Truth be told this is middling Trollope. There are about 20 of his books that are better than this.

Anthony Trollope declared once that "Lady Anna" was "the best novel I ever wrote". Readers did not agree. Appearing between the masterpieces "Phineas Redux" and "The Way We Live Now", it sold poorly and has been neglected ever since. Trollope blamed this failure on his audience's objections to the heroine's choice of a husband, though similar complaints, much more vehemently expressed, had not sunk "The Small House at Allington".

Anthony Trollope (/ˈtrɒləp/; 24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary coun. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote novels on political, social, and gender issues, and other topical matters. Trollope's literary reputation dipped somewhat during the last years of his life, but he had regained the esteem of critics by the mid-20th century.

Last updated Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 14:24. To the best of our knowledge, the text of this work is in the Public Domain in Australia. eBooksaide The University of Adelaide Library University of Adelaide South Australia 5005. Table of Contents Next.

Trollope considered this his best novel. Although I have read only a few of Trollope's other novels, this definitely stands out from that small selection. Lady Anna's mother was abandoned by her.

But Daniel Thwaite was a thoughtful man who had read many books

0,0. 0 читателей оценили. But Daniel Thwaite was a thoughtful man who had read many books. More's Utopia and Harrington's Oceana, with many a tale written in the same spirit, had taught him to believe that a perfect form of government, or rather of policy, under which all men might be happy and satisfied, was practicable upon earth, and was to be achieved, – not merely by the slow amelioration of mankind under God's fostering ordinances, – but.

The Project Gutenberg eBook, Lady Anna, by Anthony Trollope. E-text prepared by Delphine Lettau and Joseph E. Loewenstein, . Vol. I. London: chapman and hall, 193, piccadilly.

After Josephine discovers that her marriage to Lord Lovel is invalid, she obsessively fights to win her right to be a countess
Comments to eBook Lady Anna
Neol
While this was a good plot it was very repetitive. We heard the pros and cons of the legalities of the case from every perspective ad nauseum. There were no extenuating circumstances for Anna the child of poverty when she became Anna the lady, everybody seeemed to forget the wickedness of the father and the many years of the neglect of the Lovel family. Both suitors seeemed equally deserving but class prejudice would not let go. Wish Trollope could have written more.
Lightseeker
Anthony Trollope declared once that "Lady Anna" was "the best novel I ever wrote". Readers did not agree. Appearing between the masterpieces "Phineas Redux" and "The Way We Live Now", it sold poorly and has been neglected ever since. Trollope blamed this failure on his audience's objections to the heroine's choice of a husband, though similar complaints, much more vehemently expressed, had not sunk "The Small House at Allington". (There Lily Dale remains faithful to the memory of a cad, scorning the devoted attentions of a worthy suitor. Anna's wooers, by contrast, are both good men, though vastly different in rank and personality.)
"Lady Anna" is, in fact, a well-knit narrative with more suspense than is usual for Trollope. Will the courts declare Anna to be Lady Anna Lovel, heiress to 35,000 pounds a year, or merely Anna Murray, a pauper? Which of her suitors, the sometimes surly tailor Daniel Thwaite or her handsome, good-natured cousin Lord Lovel, will Anna prefer? Will Daniel's political principles lead to a breach with his childhood sweetheart? Will the impoverished Lord Lovel find honorable means to support his noble rank? The plot takes surprising, if not astonishing, turns; the characterization is as deft as ever; and there is a leavening of subtle humor, such as Daniel's cross-purposes consultation with a quondam radical poet (a thinly disguised Robert Southey) who has evolved into an intractable Tory.
The book's weakness is that the leading characters are, by and large, decent folk at the beginning and, except for one who falls into a state akin to madness, remain decent, if not unchanged, to the end. Conflicts end in rational compromises. Everybody eventually sees everybody else's point of view. Even the lawyers on opposite sides of Lady Anna's case get along amicably. (One solicitor does have the sense to grumble that such harmony is unprofessional.)
Trollope's liking for this novel may have arisen from the fact that it is light, sunny and fresh. There may be an evil earl in the first chapter and a mad countess in the last, but how pleasant for the writer to be free for a time from the political intrigues, financial manipulations and cynical worldliness of the Palliser saga and "The Way We Live Now"! Moreover, "Lady Anna" was, in its creator's mind, only a prologue. The last paragraph promises a (never written) sequel, where the characters doubtless were intended to meet sterner challenges. There are hints that the scene would have shifted to Australia and America and that the hero's and heroine's homegrown principles were to be put to the test in those lands. Thus the author had much in view that he never disclosed to his readers, perhaps accounting for part of the discrepancy between his opinion and theirs.
No one who has not read all of the Palliser and Barset novels, not to mention "The Way We Live Now", should pick up "Lady Anna". I recommend it immediately after the last-named. It will cleanse the palate and leave a lingering regret that the rest of Anna's and Daniel's and Lord Lovel's adventures will never be known.
Incidental note: The introduction to the Oxford World's Classics edition, the one that I am reviewing, is an extraordinarily silly example of lit crit bafflegab. Don't read it before reading the novel. Read afterwards, its wrong-headed ideological interpretations may prove amusing.
Thordigda
I'm on my way to reading all of Trollope's novels and this is a very interesting one, but for fear of giving spoilers I'll just say it brings up some 19th century obsessions and how they play out against more enduring values. Read it!
Painshade
Woman married to wealthy earl, or so she thinks. Finally she's told that he's already married, he abandons her, she has a daughter and ends up being supported by another man (no romance). She spends her time trying to regain her title and put her daughter into society. I've come to the conclusion, after trying some of Trollop's other books that he's just not my 'dish' of tea. Was not able to finish, and that's very unusual for me.
Helldor
I've read a lot of Trollope's works, and I can't say this one falls anywhere near the top of my list. Despite it having a stronger plot line than many of his other works, it contains what I think are some of his weakest characters. I will admit that I'm a sentimental sucker for the gentle yet flawed characters which populate so much of Trollope's work; but the Countess in this novel is no such character. She's a dark, humorless [.......] from beginning to end, with no endearing qualities or redeeming quirks. Overall, I found it one of his more dreary novels.
Malogamand
This book did not hold my attention as his others I've read have. I became rather impatient for getting to the obvious conclusion. He does not have the mysterious twists and turns of Wilkie Collins, but then, I haven't found anyone who does. His writing is clear, clean, and refreshing after reading the vulgar, immoral books being written now. Supplying the public's current taste becomes rather offensive, and Trollope may or may not have approved.
Anicasalar
The plot was interesting but the characters were not as likeable as usual. And towards the end it got a little repetitive. Not sorry I spent my time reading it though.
It is an interesting novel about inheritance and the values of the society in the 1800's. With the increase in the population of the middle class in the villages, some new individual opinions emerge from one of the educated male characters, Daniel Thwaite who thinks outside the box of the aristocratic world. This book by Anthony Trollope more clearly elucidates for us the heritage value in England.
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