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Fb2 An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts ePub

by Joseph W. Koterski

Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Author: Joseph W. Koterski
ISBN: 1405106778
ISBN13: 978-1405106771
Language: English
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (November 17, 2008)
Pages: 256
Fb2 eBook: 1680 kb
ePub eBook: 1479 kb
Digital formats: mbr lit txt azw

Another strength of the book is Koterski's skillful way of motivating philosophical interest in concepts and ideas thatĀ . It's better than one-star.

Another strength of the book is Koterski's skillful way of motivating philosophical interest in concepts and ideas that might otherwise seem arcane to the beginner. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, 1 October 2010). An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy" was written to give beginners an overview of the basic themes and problems that shaped medieval philosophy (the subtitle is "Basic Concepts").

This book analyzes the ways in which some of the greatest medievalĀ . Reverend Joseph W. Koterski, .

This book analyzes the ways in which some of the greatest medieval thinkers contributed to the discussion of each of these topics-from Augustine of Hippo and Boethius to Aquinas, Scotus, and William of Ockham. Lucid and insightful, An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy offers an illuminating window into the minds of the medieval philosophers who bridged the ancient and modern worlds and developed ideas that have shaped the course of Western thought. is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham University.

By exploring the philosophical character of some of the greatest medieval thinkers, An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy provides a rich overview of philosophy in the world of Latin Christianity

Historical Western Philosophy. An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts. Another strength of the book is Koterski's skillful way of motivating philosophical interest in concepts and ideas that might otherwise seem arcane to the beginner.

Historical Western Philosophy. Chapter (PDF) Table of Contents (PDF).

Wiley-Blackwell (2008). Similar books and articles. Medieval Philosophy: An Introduction. By exploring the philosophical character of some of the greatest medieval thinkers, An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy provides a rich overview of philosophy in the world of Latin Christianity. Richard N. Bosley & Martin M. Tweedale (ed. - 2006 - Broadview Press.

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This is a brand new book at a great price. Author Joseph Koterski. Publication Year 2008. Publisher Wiley-Blackwell. Condition Brand New. Pages 256. Specifications.

Basic Concepts discussion and chapter questions and find An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts study guide questions and answers. Get started today for free

Study An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts discussion and chapter questions and find An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts study guide questions and answers. Get started today for free. All Documents from An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts. phi 254 fall 2012 midterm definitions 2012-10-26. term flashcards - midterm 2011-10-05.

Reverend Joseph W. Country of Publication. Philosophy & Psychology.

By exploring the philosophical character of some of the greatestmedieval thinkers, An Introduction to MedievalPhilosophy provides a rich overview of philosophy in theworld of Latin Christianity. Explores the deeply philosophical character of such medievalthinkers as Augustine, Boethius, Eriugena, Anselm, Aquinas,Bonaventure, Scotus, and OckhamReviews the central features of the epistemological andmetaphysical problem of universalsShows how medieval authors adapted philosophical ideas fromantiquity to apply to their religious commitmentsTakes a broad philosophical approach of the medieval eraby,taking account of classical metaphysics, general culture, andreligious themes
Comments to eBook An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts
Hunaya
Father Joe Koterski SJ, a Jesuit philosopher at Fordham University, authors this highly readable little monograph on medieval philosophy. As a former philosophy graduate student who struggles to stay awake when I read most contemporary philosophy books, I can tell you that much current philosophy is badly written. But Koterski shows here that good scholarship is never an excuse for poor, lazy, or self-aggrandizing writing. This book, emphasizing Aquinas among others, is one of the rare modern-day philosophy textbooks that is a pleasure rather than a headache to read. It would be nice to see it in an undergraduate or Masters-level medieval course.

While it's true that Koterski simplifies medieval philosophy quite a bit here, synthesizing its key principles in a way that may be too neat for some scholars, I personally appreciated this approach very much. And a good teacher can push back against this highly accessible text, jumping off from it into more complex discussions as helpful. Of course, Father Koterski also comes at this material from a robust Catholic perspective, and that interpretation might be what is setting some earlier reviewers off here. Nevertheless, none of us has a copyright on the interpretation of the medieval scholastic philosophers, and there are many valid ways to interpret them. As far as I can tell, Koterski's only sin is that he fails to accept a certain secular consensus of interpretation in parts of the book, but his take is quite valid. Don't let ideology scare you off from reading this one: It's quite good.
Shem
ThinkAgain (see below) was too hard on this book. It's better than one-star.

"An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy" was written to give beginners an overview of the basic themes and problems that shaped medieval philosophy (the subtitle is "Basic Concepts"). Separate chapters deal with subjects such as God, universals, morality, and the like. The writing is clear. I especially liked the summary of natural law.

That said, philosophy students will not get much from the book, since no argument is unpacked in depth. History students will get more out of it, but even they might be disappointed by the arrangement of topics (thematic not chronological) and by the absence of biographic or social background information. Maybe theology students would be the best audience, or anyone else wondering about the support that reason can lend to religious faith.

I'm just an interested layman who wanted a painless introduction to medieval philosophy and theology. The book suited me fine. If nothing else, it showcases the diversity and creativity of medieval philosophy, and will inspire many readers to delve further into the subject. Maybe that's all we should expect from an introduction.
Precious
The real pity is that some people cannot abide a professor who strives to make this topic accessible to the average student. An excellent job and so very helpful for the non specialist who gets just what the author promised - an INTRODUCTION!
Aradwyn
Given how clearly this book is written, it's a real pity it's not very good. I read this book with a view to giving it undergraduate students as a light introduction to medieval philosophy, instead I've had to add it to the category "Do not read, as it will seriously mislead!" The book is incredibly superficial and skips over many central issues (and all the while mixing modern and medieval ontology as if there's no difference). The chapter on the medieval problem of universals is extremely superficial, and still managed to wander away from the central issue. All of two and a half pages are devoted to the treatment of universals in the High Middle Ages, one of the central philosophical issues of the day. Aquinas gets about one third of a page, Duns Scotus about half a page, whereas Ockham gets nearly an entire page. Needless to say, this is a weak and almost pointlessly brief treatment of one of the most important philosophical debates between the 12th to 14th centuries. You'll find a far deeper discussion of this topic in most books of medieval Church history, or in any book that touches on mediaeval thought in any way. Koterski's introduction is perhaps best avoided (unless you're into Radical Orthodoxy, in which case it's a definite step up!)

Instead of this book I would recommend: John Marenbon's Medieval Philosophy: A Historical and Philosophical Introduction [which is informative, and philosophically rich], or Anthony Kenny's [remarkably clear and compelling] Medieval Philosophy (volume 2 of A New History of Western Philosophy) or Armaund Maurer's classic text Medieval Philosophy [which is hard to beat for its depth and clarity].
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