» » Henry IV Part II (Folger Shakespeare Library)

Fb2 Henry IV Part II (Folger Shakespeare Library) ePub

by William Shakespeare

Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Author: William Shakespeare
ISBN: 0671739093
ISBN13: 978-0671739096
Language: English
Publisher: Washington Square Press (January 1, 1991)
Fb2 eBook: 1462 kb
ePub eBook: 1294 kb
Digital formats: mobi lrf rtf txt

Home William Shakespeare Henry IV, Part 1 (Folger Shakespeare .

Home William Shakespeare Henry IV, Part 1 (Folger Shakespeare Library). Henry iv part 1 folger . .Henry IV, Part 1 (Folger Shakespeare Library), . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27. The RSC Shakespeare. Synopsis of Henry IV Part II. Henry IV in Performance: The RSC and Beyond. Four Centuries of Henry IV: An Overview. The action begins some time after the events that ended Shakespeare's earlier play, Richard II. Henry Bullingbrook has usurped the throne of King Richard, who has been murdered. But now the rebels who helped Henry to the throne have turned against him.

in the United States. It has the world's largest collection of the printed works of William Shakespeare, and is a primary repository for rare materials from the early modern period (1500–1750). The library was established by Henry Clay Folger in association with his wife, Emily Jordan Folger. It opened in 1932, two years after his death.

Folger Shakespeare Library has been an excellent resource for me, as I came to these plays with absolutely no knowledge of Shakespeare whatsoever. There are word translations on one side of the page and text summaries for each act, and the occasional illustration.

In the Henry IV plays, however, Shakespeare conspicuously dropped the image of Bullingbrook, now king, as a popular figure

In the Henry IV plays, however, Shakespeare conspicuously dropped the image of Bullingbrook, now king, as a popular figure. Far from showing himself among his people and exemplifying strong government, Henry IV skulks in his palace as his kingdom disintegrates around him, the penalty for his usurpation of his throne. As so often in Shakespeare, the wheel of history comes full circle.

Folger shakespeare library. Main (202) 544-4600 Box Office (202) 544-7077.

RUMOUR, the Presenter KING HENRY THE FOURTH. HENRY, PRINCE OF WALES, afterwards HENRY PRINCE JOHN OF LANCASTER PRINCE HUMPHREY OF GLOUCESTER THOMAS, DUKE OF CLARENCE Sons of Henry IV. Earl of northumberland. SCROOP, ARCHBISHOP OF YORK LORD MOWBRAY LORD HASTINGS LORD BARDOLPH SIR JOHN COLVILLE TRAVERS and MORTON, retainers of Northumberland Opposites against King Henry IV. Earl of warwick. EARL OF WESTMORELAND EARL OF SURREY EARL OF KENT GOWER HARCOURT BLUNT Of the King's party.

images from the Folger Shakespeare Library’s vast holdings of rare books -An annotated guide to further reading.

images from the Folger Shakespeare Library’s vast.

Having established their name as the leading publisher of classic literature and art, Delphi Classics produce publications that are individually crafted with superior formatting, while introducing many rare texts for the first time in digital print. Find this Pin and more on Shakespeare by Roy Kenagy. Warkworth Castle Henry Iv Part 1 Shakespeare Plays William Shakespeare Richard Ii King Henry Prince And Princess Watercolor And Ink Acting. Richard Ii. Prince And Princess. King Henry IV, pt. 1, II, 3: Hotspur reading a letter alone in Warkworth Castle. Watercolor and ink, 1840.

Book by Shakespeare, William
Comments to eBook Henry IV Part II (Folger Shakespeare Library)
Ger
Among the very best of the Arden 3’s in terms of both clarity of writing (and of proofreading*), scholarship, thoroughness (though thankfully it refrains from the lit-theory gobbledygook that mars several of the Arden 3’s), and unbiased weighing of different scholarly views about the play. The fascinating Introduction and Appendixes are clear, concise, and thoughtful, and the textual commentary detailed and uncommonly helpful (especially in unraveling the conversational language of the comic scenes).
This indispensable commentary engages the reader in the editor’s own love of the play both on the page and in performance.

*I notice just one typo (on p. 62 “mind end” s.b. “mine end”) and one copy editor’s oversight (2.2.30-1n, where “first mention” is contradicted by 1.2.109n).
Shaktit
Henry IV, Part 2, is seldom performed today. The story, which continues the action that more or less concluded in Henry IV, Part 1, is a bit anti-climatic. So why bother? And why Five Stars? Well, first it is Shakespeare, and Shakespeare is always worthwhile, and second, one of the characters is Shakespeare's greatest comic invention, Sir John Falstaff. The Fat Knight, who also appears in Henry IV, Part 1, The Merry Wives of Windsor, and who dies in Henry V, has been amusing playgoers for 400-hundred years. He is no less funny today. Equally worthwhile is the introduction by Claire McEachern, a Shakespeare scholar and professor at UCLA. Her analysis of Henry IV, Part 1, is the finest I've ever come across. Her brilliant essay on Prince Hal's transformation is a veritable training course in leadership. She sets the stage for Henry IV, Part 2, showing us that a change has taken place in English society since the battle at Shrewsbury, that concluded Part 1. The teaming universe of valiant young men in possession of high and often misguided ideals, has been exhausted and largely decimated by war, replaced by "a country of old men," where "politics is no longer a matter of high ideals and high tempers, but an ignoble and repetitive motion of declining momentum." Indeed, she tells us that the thrilling confusion, the risk-taking of Prince Hal, and the heroic sacrifice of Hotspur at Shrewsbury, has been replaced with diminished expectations and leaders of lesser scruples, such as "the subtle scheming of Prince John, who violates the terms of truce once the rebel army deserts its leaders. Glorious death has become ignominious capture, and daring combat, cold scheming."

Even Falstaff has been affected. He's no longer as funny. Writes McEachern: "The vitality, energetic wordplay, and improvisational mockery of power that endeared him to us earlier have dwindled to a few stale jokes about his girth." It is Prince Hal who has changed the most, having shown himself in battle as a fierce warrior and an effective leader. He no longer has time to banter with Falstaff in an Eastcheap saloon, but is fully prepared to assume leadership of the English people--too ready. In one memorable scene, thinking his father has died, he tries on the crown only to be severely reprimanded by his father who is in fact still alive. At the play's conclusion, with his father buried and Hal now Henry V, king of England, he refuses to recognize his old friend in public, Sir John Falstaff. "I know thee not, old man," he says. It's one of the key moments in the play. Says McEachern: "The rejection of Falstaff by Henry V may be the most painful moment in Shakespeare."

McEachern has more to say about Henry IV, Part 2, which makes The Pelican Shakespeare edition worthwhile. The play isn't bad either. Which begs the question: why spend 10-hours reading today's novelists who are here today and gone tomorrow, when you can read one of immortal Shakespeare's plays in 90 minutes? It's food for the brain, not candy.
PanshyR
The book was in perfect condition and exactly as described. I bought this for my daughter college class and she is very pleased with the book overall.
Samardenob
This is by far the best translation of a Shakespeare play I've ever read. This is The Book for serious enthusiasts of Elizabethan plays. Many words are defined from the era which is imperative for those of us trying to preserve the arts. This is a Must Buy.
DireRaven
This is, by far, the best edition of a Shakespeare play that I own. Firstly, it contains the first and second part of Henry IV which is amazing. It has a great introduction and ending commentaries. Plus, there is a short plot overview at the beginning of each scene, but the textual notes are not too long or over detailed, so you can still dig through the text and discover things for yourself. Both part one and part two are Shakespeare's best histories. They have the most outstanding language, the Bard's best comic, Falstaff, and exciting plot lines.
Acrobat
Worked seamlessly on Kindle
Saberdragon
For those who use the notes correctly--as a guide to appreciation as they read the text--it is excellent.
Exactly what I expected
Related to Henry IV Part II (Folger Shakespeare Library)
Richard II eBook
Fb2 Richard II ePub
The Tempest (New Folger Library Shakespeare) eBook
Fb2 The Tempest (New Folger Library Shakespeare) ePub
Othello (Folger Library) eBook
Fb2 Othello (Folger Library) ePub
Henry IV. Part 1: Texts and Contexts (Bedford Shakespeare) eBook
Fb2 Henry IV. Part 1: Texts and Contexts (Bedford Shakespeare) ePub
King Henry IV (Arden Shakespeare) eBook
Fb2 King Henry IV (Arden Shakespeare) ePub
Titus Andronicus (Folger Shakespeare Library) eBook
Fb2 Titus Andronicus (Folger Shakespeare Library) ePub
The Two Gentlemen of Verona (Folger Shakespeare Library) eBook
Fb2 The Two Gentlemen of Verona (Folger Shakespeare Library) ePub
The First Part of King Henry VI (The New Cambridge Shakespeare) (Pt.1) eBook
Fb2 The First Part of King Henry VI (The New Cambridge Shakespeare) (Pt.1) ePub
An Introduction to Shakespeare eBook
Fb2 An Introduction to Shakespeare ePub