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Fb2 Cleopatra: A Sourcebook (Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture) ePub

by Prudence J. Jones

Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Author: Prudence J. Jones
ISBN: 080613741X
ISBN13: 978-0806137414
Language: English
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press (April 10, 2006)
Pages: 304
Fb2 eBook: 1337 kb
ePub eBook: 1166 kb
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Dr. Prudence Jones has in Cleopatra, A Sourcebook, compiled a volume quite valuable for teacher and scholar alike.

Dr. Not only are the various Classical sources fully present, but the post-Classical life of Cleopatra is well represented, as found, for example in Chaucer Shakespeare, and Dryden. The views of female authors on Cleopatra, such as and Charlotte Bronte are represented.

Cleopatra: A Sourcebook (Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture). Download (pdf, . 1 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Cleopatra: A Sourcebook. This fascinating sourcebook documents what we know of the historical figure and also shows how she has evolved through the lens of interpretation. Arranged both chronologically and thematically, the volume consists of a series of readings about, literary, and g from ancient times to the twentieth century, from the European Romantics to the Afro centrists, and from Middle English to modern Arabic.

Suitable for classroom use, Cleopatra: A Sourcebook reveals a multitude . Cleopatra: A Sourcebook 31. cilt/Oklahoma series in classical culture.

Suitable for classroom use, Cleopatra: A Sourcebook reveals a multitude of Cleopatras, raising as many questions as it answers about one of history’s most captivating figures. In her introductions to the readings, Prudence J. Jones provides helpful information about the sources, placing them in historical and cultural context. She includes passages both familiar and unfamiliar, some not easily found in translation. Suitable for classroom use, Cleopatra: A Sourcebook reveals a multitude of Cleopatras, raising as many questions as it answers about one of history’s most captivating figures. By Prudence J. Jones. Evil woman," the moment I saw such a term used for Cleopatra, I knew this book was trouble, written by a Roman enthusiast, I'm assuming. Shop for Books on Google Play. And it is obviously this "author" only ever read the works of such pruny, old, hateful men who still could not deny her of beauty nor intelligence.

Prudence J. Jones, Cleopatra. The work begins with a brief summary of Cleopatra's life and a statement of the book's agenda by the author, Prudence Jones (PJ). Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture, 31. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2006. Part 1 Ancient Sources begins with extracts from Diodorus Siculus, Pausanias, Strabo and Plutarch on the geographical history of Hellenistic Egypt and the city of Alexandria. This is followed by a passage from the Theocritus, Idyll 17, an encomium of the Ptolemies. Each passage is preceded by a short introduction to the author and period.

A good example is the blaxploitation film Cleopatra Jones in which a black female super-spy exposes police .

A good example is the blaxploitation film Cleopatra Jones in which a black female super-spy exposes police brutality against the Los Angeles black community. 8 Criticism of the theory that Cleopatra was black has been fierce and for understandable reasons. Yet the question underlying the African American reading of Cleopatra remains valid: Who wrote the books? 11 For almost two millennia, historians have been forced to rely almost entirely on sources written by her enemies to reconstruct the biography of the last of the Ptolemies.

Cleopatra : a sourcebook. Cleopatra : a sourcebook. by. Jones, Prudence . 1971-. Cleopatra, Queen of Egypt, d. 30 ., Egypt - History - 332-30 . Norman : University of Oklahoma Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;.

Sub-Genre: Historical. Series Title: Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture. This fascinating sourcebook documents what we know of the historical figure and also shows how she has evolved through the lens of interpretation

Sub-Genre: Historical. Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press. Author: Prudence J Jones. Street Date: April 10, 2006.

She is the author of Cleopatra: A Sourcebook as well as articles in journals, such as Classical World and Latomus.

Who was Cleopatra? Who is Cleopatra? Viewed as both goddess and monster even in her own lifetime, she has become through the ages saint and sinner, heroine and victim, femme fatale and star-crossed lover, black and white. A protean figure, Cleopatra defies categorization.

Cleopatra’s life story, gleaned from contemporary sources, is powerfully intriguing: Married four times, she seduced two of the most powerful men in Rome (Julius Caesar and Marc Antony), became the sole ruler of Egypt, gained legendary status for her lavish banquets, and chose to die rather than endure disgrace as the prisoner of Octavian, Caesar’s heir.

This fascinating sourcebook documents what we know of the historical figure and also shows how she has evolved through the lens of interpretation. Arranged both chronologically and thematically, the volume consists of a series of readings about Cleopatra―historical, literary, and documentary―extending from ancient times to the twentieth century, from the European Romantics to the Afro centrists, and from Middle English to modern Arabic.

In her introductions to the readings, Prudence J. Jones provides helpful information about the sources, placing them in historical and cultural context. She includes passages both familiar and unfamiliar, some not easily found in translation. Suitable for classroom use, Cleopatra: A Sourcebook reveals a multitude of Cleopatras, raising as many questions as it answers about one of history’s most captivating figures.

 

Comments to eBook Cleopatra: A Sourcebook (Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture)
Rgia
Cleopatra: A Sourcebook is a great collection of abridged sources regarding Queen Cleopatra VII. The evolution of her story is also an interesting read. My only problems with the book came from the charts and maps at the end. The Ptolemaic family tree, though abbreviated, is also inaccurate. The largest mistake shows Mark Antony as Cleopatra's brother! As for the map of Alexandria, the Western city walls are shown to be in the sea. This had to have been a computer design error, but it's kind of sad that no one caught it.
White gold
Excellent book and a great seller.
Gindian
Very good resource for the student of Cleopatra, with all the ancient sources (and a few newer ones) pulled together in one place. I only missed better descriptions of where the texts come from, especially since many of them seem to be only available as later copies of dubious provenance.
Kadar
It is an excellent reference work for those who know little or nothing about Cleopatra and Egypt. I would recommend it as a first step in learning about Cleo and her circumstances.
Sharpbinder
Dr. Prudence Jones has in Cleopatra, A Sourcebook, compiled a volume quite valuable for teacher and scholar alike. Not only are the various Classical sources fully present, but the post-Classical life of Cleopatra is well represented, as found, for example in Chaucer Shakespeare, and Dryden. The views of female authors on Cleopatra, such as and Charlotte Bronte are represented. The "Egyptomania" of the nineteenth century ( e.g. Shelly's Ozymandias), Cleopatra in the Arabic tradition (including a passage in which Octavian dies, bitten by snake, soon after he learns of Cleopatra's death) and Afrocentric views of Cleopatra, and more modern Cleopatras, such as that of Barbara Chase-Riboud, are also represented. These passages are given brief introductions which provide the necessary context. There are also illustrations and even maps and genealogical tables. And because this book grew out of course Dr. Jones helped develop at Bryn Mawr, it is structured so as to be useful, not only for courses in Cleopatra or the Augustan Age, but for a wide variety of courses in Classics and the Classical tradition. I recommend it highly.
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