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Fb2 Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias and Cratylus (Focus Philosophical Library) ePub

by Joe Sachs,Plato

Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Author: Joe Sachs,Plato
ISBN: 1585103624
ISBN13: 978-1585103621
Language: English
Publisher: Focus; First edition (August 15, 2010)
Pages: 230
Fb2 eBook: 1870 kb
ePub eBook: 1715 kb
Digital formats: rtf mobi azw mbr

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Sachs’ introductory discussion of sophistry and philosophy in Plato is the best I know of and highly recommended for the serious student of philosophy. Burt Hopkins, Seattle University. Joe Sachs taught for thirty years at St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland.

Sachs' introductory discussion of sophistry and philosophy in Plato is the best I know of and highly recommended for .

Sachs' introductory discussion of sophistry and philosophy in Plato is the best I know of and highly recommended for the serious student of philosophy. Joe Sachs of St. John’s College in Annapolis discusses the sophists in detail in his illuminating introductory essay in his important book Socrates and the Sophists: Plato’s Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus, translated by Joe Sachs (Indianapolis and Cambridge, UK: Focus Philosophical Library/ Hackett Publishing, 2011, page 1-39).

Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a ke. .

Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay

Socrates and the Sophists. Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, & Cratylus. Plato Translated, with Introductory Essay, by Joe Sachs. 2010 - 230 pp. Imprint: Focus, Series: Focus Philosophical Library.

Socrates and the Sophists. This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogues (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Perhaps more than any other dialogue, the Cratylus has been in need of retranslation.

This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience. Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias major and Cratylus. Focus philosophical library.

This is an English translation of four of Plato's dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought.

COUPON: Rent Socrates and the Sophists Plato's Protagoras . Includes notes and an introductory essay

Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias and Cratylus. Plato’s Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus. Translation and Introductory Essay. Newburyport: Focus Publishing. The Hedonism in Plato’s Protagoras. Phronesis 6(1): 9–28. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Cite this chapter as: Haraldsen . 2017) Is Pleasure Any Good? Weakness of Will and the Art of Measurement in Plato’s Protagoras. In: Pettersson . Songe-Møller V. (eds) Plato’s Protagoras. Philosophical Studies Series, vol 125. Springer, Cham.

Whereas Plato’s depictions of Protagoras – and to a lesser extent Gorgias – indicate a modicum of respect, he.Prodicus of Ceos, who lived during roughly the same period as Protagoras and Hippias, is best known for his subtle distinctions between the meanings of words.

Whereas Plato’s depictions of Protagoras – and to a lesser extent Gorgias – indicate a modicum of respect, he presents Hippias as a comic figure who is obsessed with money, pompous and confused. Hippias is best known for his polymathy (DK 86A14). His areas of expertise seem to have included astronomy, grammar, history, mathematics, music, poetry, prose, rhetoric, painting and sculpture. He is thought to have written a treatise titled On the Correctness of Names.

This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay.

Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.

Comments to eBook Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias and Cratylus (Focus Philosophical Library)
Jugore
The merits of Joe Sacks' translations are considerable. What I didn't expect was the wide-ranging, 60-page essay on the Ideas and eidetic numbers that prefaces the translation. The essay alone makes this an advisable acquisition for any student of things Platonic.
Nalaylewe
Sachs, as usual, is simultaneously more faithful and more readable than any of the other translations, including the translations which opt for either extreme. I'm not sure why his aren't the standard translations in scholarship yet, though they are becoming increasingly standard in the classroom.
Great grouping of dialogues as well.
Rigiot
I ordered a new copy, received a used one.
Gelgen
Joe Sachs of St. John’s College in Annapolis discusses the sophists in detail in his illuminating introductory essay in his important book Socrates and the Sophists: Plato’s Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus, translated by Joe Sachs (Indianapolis and Cambridge, UK: Focus Philosophical Library/ Hackett Publishing, 2011, page 1-39). In the introduction, Joe Sachs says, “It is amusing to reflect that a standard interpretation of Plato solemnly informs us that he believed in a separate world of forms where everything is static perfection, to which the philosopher flees because everything in this world is a hopeless mess. If there is anything to our way of reading the four dialogues included here, the only philosopher to whom the standard interpretation would apply is Cratylus, and the doctrine the interpreters attribute to Plato is what Plato himself [through the character Socrates] exposes as the foundation of all sophistry” (pages 37-38).

Joe Sachs deserves credit for clarifying this aspect of Plato’s thought.

Now, if the doctrine that Plato’s Socrates exposes as the foundation of all sophistry involves the illusory sense of a world of forms where everything is static perfection, then the opposite doctrine would be mere subjectivism and relativism. Mere subjectivism and relativism would hold that the world is in such a state of flux that we cannot posit any meaningful patterns – and/or that the patterns that we do posit are illusory constructs. To be sure, we do indeed posit verbal constructs, and we do indeed construct predications of our verbal constructs when we speak to one another. In addition, we may need to adjust our operational definitions of our verbal constructs and of our predications of them. In the final analysis, Plato embraces philosophical realism.

Now, my favorite philosopher is the American Jesuit Walter J. Ong (1912-2003; Ph.D. in English, Harvard University, 1955) of Saint Louis University, the Jesuit university in St. Louis, Missouri (USA). Ong liked to say that his thought is phenomenological and personalist in cast. Over the years, Ong has at times mistakenly attributed to Plato the position that Joe Sachs has clarified that Plato did not hold. However, if we disregard Ong’s mistaken attribution of that position to Plato and concentrate instead on the position itself, then we can identify one major thrust in Ong’s thought over the years – he rejects the position. Of course, like most Roman Catholic thinkers, he also rejects mere subjectivism and relativism.

In effect, Ong hints at something like the three broad categories of philosophical thought that I have referred to here -- (1) the illusory world of forms and static perfection, (2) mere subjectivism and relativism, and (3) philosophical realism -- in his 1977 essay in which he uses systems terminology: “Voice and the Opening of Closed Systems” in his book Interfaces of the Word: Studies in the Evolution of Consciousness and Culture (Cornell University Press, 1977, pages 305-341). His 1977 essay is reprinted in volume two of his Faith and Contexts (Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1992, pages 162-190).

To be clear, (1) the illusory world of forms and static perfection represents closed-system thought; (2) mere subjectivism and relativism represents open-systems thought; (3) philosophical realism represents what Ong refers to as open closure. As Joe Sachs has clarified Plato’s philosophical position, Plato embraced philosophical realism.

Incidentally, the American philosopher Martha C. Nussbaum also embraces philosophical realism in her article “Human Functioning and Social Justice: In Defense of Aristotelian Essentialism” in the journal Political Theory, volume 20, number 2 (May 1992): pages 202-246.
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