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Fb2 Fighting The Forces: What's At Stake In Buffy The Vampire Slayer? ePub

by David Lavery

Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Author: David Lavery
ISBN: 0742516814
ISBN13: 978-0742516816
Language: English
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.; First Edition edition (February 18, 2002)
Pages: 320
Fb2 eBook: 1455 kb
ePub eBook: 1617 kb
Digital formats: lrf doc docx rtf

Fighting the Forces book. Good television, like the character of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, fights them

Fighting the Forces book. Good television, like the character of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, fights them. Fighting the Forces explores the struggle to create meaning in an impressive example of popular culture, the television series phenomenon Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In the essays collected here, contributors examine the series using a variety of techniques and viewpoints.

Fighting the Forces: What's at Stake in Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a 2002 academic publication relating to the fictional Buffyverse established by TV series, Buffy and Angel. The book looks at the struggle to examine meaning in the television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The series is examined from a variety of viewpoints, and especially the social and cultural issues dealt with by the series and their place in a wider literary context.

Giles calls Buffy's contacts in Cleveland but is able only to leave a message for the very busy Slayer. Rhonda V. Wilcox; David Lavery (February 25, 2002). Fighting the Forces: What's at Stake in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. He learns that the amulet Cordelia was wearing is that of Anyanka, whose granted wishes can be undone only if her center of power is destroyed. p. 229. ISBN 978-0-7425-8001-5.

Good television, like the character of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, fights them Furthermore, the book explores the extratextual, such as fanfiction and online discussion groups

Good television, like the character of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, fights them. Furthermore, the book explores the extratextual, such as fanfiction and online discussion groups. The book is additionally supplemented by an online journal Slayage (ww. layage.

All the results obtained from the experiments prove that a Sybil attack succeeded with high probability, in forcibly re-electing the same prey node as a leader of the cluster. Novelty: The vampire act of Sybil attack on the maximum connectivity based clustering is shown for the first time in this paper.

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Fighting the Forces: What's at Stake in Buffy the Vampire Slayer is an academic publication relating to the fictional Buffyverse established by TV series, Buffy and Angel.

A lthough most of the good titles have already been taken-Fighting the Forces: What’s at Stake in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (Wilcox and Lavery 2002), What Makes Buffy Slay? (Udovitch 2000), ‘You Slay Me!’ Buffy as Jurisprudence of Desire (MacNeil 2007), Fans with a Lot a. .

A lthough most of the good titles have already been taken-Fighting the Forces: What’s at Stake in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (Wilcox and Lavery 2002), What Makes Buffy Slay? (Udovitch 2000), ‘You Slay Me!’ Buffy as Jurisprudence of Desire (MacNeil 2007), Fans with a Lot at Stake (Bloustein 2002), and even from the series itself, Being A Vampire Sucks (4003, The Harsh Light of Day, 1 I have come up with a title that captures what will be a predominately Lacanian reading of the series

Uniform Title: Buffy, the vampire slayer (Television program). Personal Name: Wilcox, Rhonda. Author: Wilcox, Rhonda. Author: Lavery, David, 1949

Uniform Title: Buffy, the vampire slayer (Television program). Personal Name: Lavery, David, 1949-. Rubrics: Buffy the Vampire Slayer (Fictitious character). Author: Lavery, David, 1949-. Antsirabe et le Vakinankaratra avec 21 planches de photos hors text Régis Razafintsalama, Philippe Oberlé. by Régis Razafintsalama, Philippe Oberlé. ISBN: 9782954152417 ISBN: 2954152419 Author: Razafintsalama, Régis, 1949-2010, author. Author: Oberlé, Philippe, 1941-, author.

Fighting the Forces explores the struggle to create meaning in an impressive example of popular culture, the television series phenomenon "Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Wilcox, Rhonda . Smith, Camille Bacon, Lavery, David. They analyze the social and cultural issues implicit in the series and place it in its literary context, not only by examining its literary influences (from German liebestod to Huckleberry Finn) but also by exploring the series' purposeful literary allusions.

For every television series, the original vision grows within a press of forces-both social and artistic expectations, conventions of the business, as well as conventions of the art. Bad television―predictable, commercial, exploitative―simply yields to the forces. Good television, like the character of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, fights them.Fighting the Forces explores the struggle to create meaning in an impressive example of popular culture, the television series phenomenon Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In the essays collected here, contributors examine the series using a variety of techniques and viewpoints. They analyze the social and cultural issues implicit in the series and place it in its literary context, not only by examining its literary influences (from German liebestod to Huckleberry Finn) but also by exploring the series' purposeful literary allusions. Furthermore, the book explores the extratextual, such as fanfiction and online discussion groups. The book is additionally supplemented by an online journal Slayage (www.slayage.tv), created by the book editors in acknowledgement of the ongoing nature of television art.Rhonda V. Wilcox and David Lavery have written and edited several books and articles exploring the social, literary, and artistic merit of quality television. In addition to Buffy the Vampire Slayer, their work has covered a variety of programs including Twin Peaks, Northern Exposure, The X-Files, and The Sopranos.
Comments to eBook Fighting The Forces: What's At Stake In Buffy The Vampire Slayer?
Otrytrerl
Loved this book. I cannot say that any of the ideas or criticisms were new to me, but it did make me think more about how all the things I learned in the Liberal Arts relate to Buffy and TV in general. I've started requesting and buying more tv critiques on buffy, x-files, and others. Most of us spend more time than we care to admit watching tv, and it is good to read something that encourages you to think about it critically. Since I've started reading more about TV, I've found myself changing some of my viewing habits.

It was the intro or the first chapter that discussed what makes a quality TV show--things like character development, arcs, and complex language. These are often the shows that you hear about, but then you have to dvd or netflix your way from the beginning, as jumping into the middle can be hard. The more I thought about it, the more I agreed. Some few tv shows are elevating to art and eclipsing movies in quality. Think about it, a 1 hour TV series yields about 22, 42 minute shows a year. If a show runs for 5 years, that is over 75 hours of a story. If the story is thoughtful, innovative, and well-done, then you get much more than from a movie, even with sequels.

I'm not saying we should give up books for TV, but that TV might be growing into an art form. In the late 1800's, parents limited children's time with novels, using many of the same reasons that modern parents limit TV.
Drelahuginn
There is no such thing as a perfect anthology, but by any reasonable standards, this one is first rate. The inherent problem with the anthology is that its contents are comprised by the contributions of a number of individuals. On the one hand, not every reader will find all the essays in any anthology of equal interest, while on the other, not every essay in a collection is going to be on the par of every other selection. In FIGHT THE FORCES, this is as true as well. The volume is edited by Rhonda V. Wilcox and David Lavery, the editors for the online journal SLAYAGE: THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BUFFY STUDIES ([...]
As both a lover of Buffy and an academic, I have been somewhat surprised and delighted with the embrasure of Buffy/Angel by academics and intellectuals. At the moment, there are three academic anthologies on Buffy currently available, and three more that I know of on their way (Christopher Weimer's forthcoming MONSTERS AND METAPHORS: ESSAYS ON BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER, Lisa Parks's RED NOISE: TELEVISION STUDIES AND BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER, and Glenn Yeffeth's SEVEN SEASONS OF BUFFY: SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY WRITERS DISCUSS THEIR FAVORITE TELEVISION SHOW, which should be out just a few days from the moment I am writing this review). What is most amazing about all this interest is that none that I have encountered is at all dismissive of television as a medium, as so many who write on TV shows are. All these writers assume that a truly great television show can warrant as much or more attention that a great movie or the body of work of a great film director.
As of this moment, I would rate FIGHTING THE FORCES as one of the two finest academic books available on Buffy, along with Roz Kaveney's READING THE VAMPIRE SLAYER, and above James South's BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER AND PHILOSOPHY. Most of the essays in this collection are at least interesting, and several are fascinating. Though at a disadvantage to the South collection by having been written with only knowledge of the fifth season, the essays all have relevance beyond. My favorite essays tended to be in the first section, entitled "Forces of Society and Culture: Gender, Generations, Violence, Class, Race, and Religion." Many of the essays are exceptional. Some are less than gripping, and one, a Jungian analysis of the dreams in Buffy, is one of the hardest-to-ingest essays I have ever read (I have decided that I must be completely immune to the purported charms of Jung).
For Buffy fans, I would recommend that only those with some academic proclivities give this book a try. Understanding academic articles doesn't depend on intelligence as much as habit, and if one hasn't worked through a number of academic essays before this, it isn't likely to be much fun or shed any insight on Buffy. On the other hand, academics who remain disdainful of Buffy probably need to go work through at least the first five seasons of Buffy and the first two of Angel before giving this collection a whirl.
Ice_One_Guys
If you watch Buffy because of the great fight scenes and the pretty people, this book is probably not for you.
But if you watch this show because you see the amazing depth of the characters, the metaphor and mythology it uses expertly, or if you'd like to understand those things more, this book is amazing.
It contains essays on everything from gender and postmodern politics to the uses and purposes of fanfiction and fairy tales. These are the types of topics I discuss after viewing the show, but much more in-depth due to the writers expertise. (Many of them are processors of film, literature, media studies, women's studies, etc.) It's a facinating read for anyone really interested in the show, and for those who don't watch, it will show you that the show is much more than you think.
Xellerlu
nice
KiddenDan
There are some really good perspectives throughout this book. If you would like to delve deeper into Buffy pick this up.
Punind
BTVS as a show worked on some many levels. In this volume academics and theorists write about the deeper levels of meaning, symbolism and narrative structures at work in the popular UPN television series. There's some great stuff here: there's a reading of Kendra, the West Indian Slayer, as a tragic mulatta figure; there's a discussion of why the Buffy/Willow relationship resists a queer reading; there's a provocative id/superego dyad posited for Faith and Buffy and, of course, some thoughtful discussion of Christianity in the face of rampant demonism, sexual taboos, gender disruptions etc... great, great book. I found it useful to juxtapose some of the essays here (especially the ones that look closely at the female figure in the horror genre) with Barbara Creed's seminal work, The Monstrous-Feminine : Film, Feminism, Psychoanalysis (Routledge, 1993). If you're into film theory, queer theory and feminist theory, you'll wanna, perhaps, put these two works in conversation with each other.
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