» » Silent Films, 1877-1996: A Critical Guide to 646 Movies

Fb2 Silent Films, 1877-1996: A Critical Guide to 646 Movies ePub

by Robert K. Klepper

Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Author: Robert K. Klepper
ISBN: 0786405953
ISBN13: 978-0786405954
Language: English
Publisher: McFarland Publishing (March 1, 1999)
Pages: 586
Fb2 eBook: 1484 kb
ePub eBook: 1907 kb
Digital formats: doc mbr mobi lrf

This film reference covers 646 silent motion pictures, starting with Eadweard Muybridge’s initial motion photography experiments in 1877 and even including The Taxi Dancer (1996)

This film reference covers 646 silent motion pictures, starting with Eadweard Muybridge’s initial motion photography experiments in 1877 and even including The Taxi Dancer (1996). Among the genres included are classics, dramas, Westerns, light comedies, documentaries and even poorly produced early pornography. He lived in Pensacola, Florida.

Silent Films, 1877-1996 book. Who was Robert K. Klepper? How did he do such stunning encyclopedic work, especially in the 1990s before the internet was fully present to help him? As Gish related in an introduction she did for the 1988 video release of the film, she was told ‘One happy ending could ruin your career. Gish had previously had seven unhappy endings, and was still on top.

Book DescriptionThis film reference covers 646 silent motion pictures, starting with Eadweard Muybridge?s initial motion photography experiments in 1877 and even including The Taxi Dancer .

Book DescriptionThis film reference covers 646 silent motion pictures, starting with Eadweard Muybridge?s initial motion photography experiments in 1877 and even including The Taxi Dancer (1996). ISBN: 0786421649; Book DescriptionThis film reference covers 646 silent motion pictures, starting with Eadweard Muybridge?s initial motion photography experiments in 1877 and even including The Taxi Dancer (1996).

starting with Eadweard Muybridges initial motion photography experiments in 1877 and even including The Taxi Dancer (1996).

Silent Films, 1877-1996: A Critical Guide to 646 Movies Format: Hardcover Authors: Robert K. Klepper ISBN10: 0786405953 Published: 1999-03-01 This film reference covers 646 silent motion pictures, starting with Eadweard Muybridges initial motion photography experiments in 1877 and even including The Taxi Dancer (1996).

Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Manufacturer: McFarland & Company Release date: 1 March 1999 ISBN-10 : 0786405953 ISBN-13: 9780786405954. Use tags to describe a product .

Robert K. Klepper, Silent Films, 1877-1996: A Critical Guide to 646 Movies, misidentifies the Thanhouser release as. . Klepper, Silent Films, 1877-1996: A Critical Guide to 646 Movies, misidentifies the Thanhouser release as "Thanhouser/Minot" and lists the director as William Robert Daly Release and reception. The one reel drama, approximately 1,000 feet long, was released on July 26, 1910. The release of the film fell on the same date of Vitagraph's Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Silent films, 1877-1996. a critical guide to 646 movies. by Robert K. Klepper. Published 1999 by McFarland in Jefferson, .

This film reference covers 646 silent motion pictures, starting with Eadweard Muybridge's initial motion photography experiments in 1877 and even including The Taxi. Silent Films, 1877-1996 : A Critical Guide to 646 Movies. More about Robert K. Silent Films, 1877-1996.

This film reference covers 646 silent motion pictures, starting with Eadweard Muybridge's initial motion photography experiments in 1877 and even including The Taxi Dancer (1996). Among the genres included are classics, dramas, Westerns, light comedies, documentaries and even poorly produced early pornography. Masterpieces such as Joan the Woman (1916), Intolerance (1916) and Faust (1926) can be found, as well as rare titles that have not received critical attention since their original releases. Each entry provides the most complete credits possible, a full description, critical commentary, and an evaluation of the film's unique place in motion picture history. Birth dates, death dates, and other facts are provided for the directors and players where available, with a selection of photographs of those individuals. The work is thoroughly indexed.
Comments to eBook Silent Films, 1877-1996: A Critical Guide to 646 Movies
Skilkancar
Absolutely essential guide to mostly available silent films with tons of background info, pictures and reviews for each movie. Many films listed are readily available via streaming or DVD while others exists only in print form in private collections.
Alsantrius
Great research material.
Fenrikasa
I enjoyed this book immensely this book comes in handy almost every day so I can look up references to different films.
Cobandis
As a fan of films, I purchase a lot of guides. And if you are a cinema fan, there are way too many films out there and it really helps to have guide books lying around to get an idea of what the film is about, and I tend to compare these films on these guides in helping me decide to make a purchase.

But when it comes to silent films, many guides tend to focus on only the more popular titles.

Enter Robert K. Klepper, a young writer and contributor to the publication "Classic Images" and a silent film historian who was very passionate about silent films (he supported the cause of preservation and even funded the transfer of several silent films to video tape) and in 1996, he wrote a comprehensive guide book titled "Silent Films on Video: A Filmography of over 700 Silent Features available on Videocassette, with a Directory of Sources".

And in 1999, Klepper returned with another wonderful, critical guide book on silent films titled "Silent Films, 1877-1996: A Critical Guide to 646 Movies". And for most guide or film critic books, may it be from Roger Ebert, Pauline Kael or Leonard Maltin, one would expect a yearly book in which one would continue to add to the book on a yearly basis. Unfortunately, Robert K. Klepper passed away a year after his second book was released and there really hasn't been a guide book on silent films since then and that is unfortunate.

With that being said, "Silent Films, 1877-1996: A Critical Guide to 646 Movies" is what one would experience from a book that dealt with film criticism, one may support his feelings towards that film and others may not. For those used to film critic books from Pauline Kael, Jonathan Rosenbaum, Andrew Sarris, etc., this is not an essay book and some films such D.W. Griffith's "Intolerance" or "Birth of a Nation" may have more dedicate to a certain film than others. For example, I've read that he has detested Chaplin's "little tramp" characters, so you aren't going to find many of Chaplin's tramp films in this book but he does favor films such as "The Kid" and "Modern Times".

Klepper is also not afraid to show his disdain for a film that others may have loved. For example, Murnau's 1926 film "Nosferatu", Klepper writes, "While this film has received consistent praise over the years, this reviewer fails to see why". Klepper continues with "the narrative style is rather poor, and the film drags in many spots. In some parts, the store is barely coherent.".

There are a good number of films in which I agreed with his critical review. For example, Theda Bara's 1914 film "A Fool There Was", Klepper is quick to stand up to this film by writing "Since this was Theda Bara's first film, produced at a time when the movies were still in their relatively primitive stages, it is not fair to judge Bara's performance. At points in this film, she overacts to the point of being ridiculous." and with that comment, I definitely agree with him.

Another was his review for G.W. Pabst's 1928 film "Pandora's Box" in which he praised the filmmaker and actress Louise Brooks but you also get some bits of information of actors who were living at the time that didn't respond to fan mail to Klepper thanking people and the companies for preserving the film.

The book is broken down by year and each film is presented in alphabetical order in that year and are numbered. Klepper has provided us his rating for the film as well as cast and production credits as well. Also, some films have images included.

As Klepper watched many silent films and was very astute on titles that made it to video tape, unfortunately, for those of us who no longer watch VHS copies scour the Internet for any detailed information we can get on silent films on DVD (and now on Blu-ray). So, certain titles on DVD such as Doris Kenyon's "The Ocean Waif" or Harry Langdon's "The Long Pants" on DVD from KINO or Olive Thomas' "The Flapper" on DVD from Milestone have no mention in this book. But the fact is there are silent films that are being found, restored and because this book was written and published in 1999, you're not going to all silent films in this book but yet there are still 646 titles from 1877-1996 that are included.

Overall, this book is a must-own book for those who are silent film fans. Not only as a reference or film guide book but there's no book like it out there right now. Sure, there are silent film review sites but sometimes the reviews are sparse and once in awhile, you are able to access older New York Times reviews online or old copies of Photoplay Magazine, but this book is still timeless. Some may find the book quite expensive but definitely do your research as you may find it cheaper online.

It's unfortunate that Mr. Klepper is no longer with us because I truly believe he would have found the evolution of silent films on video to be an amazing time as more are being prints are being found and restored and have no doubt that this book would have grown considerably. But his work and passion for silent films will continue to be a valuable resource for many others who are discovering silent films.

Highly recommended!
Whitemaster
I have been wanting to own this book for several years after discovering it in the reference collection of a large academic library. Finally I received it as a birthday gift from my wife last weekend. Outside of the classic works of Kevin Brownlow, there is no book on the silent era that I enjoy more. These are not just film reviews; they are filled with important information on the films, actors, and directors (and more). Best of all, virtually every film is available to the public in some format or another. I do wish for an update, as many, many additional films have come to light or have been issued since 1996. Still, this book is absolutely indispensable for silent film enthusiasts.
Jaberini
Profiling over 600 movies in general is very time-consuming, but Robert Klepper does a superb job in highlighting not only the most popular silent films in existence but also vague titles that seem lost in time well deserving of recognition. By the fact that Klepper's research went as far back into the 1870s, when many short films twenty years later are lauded as the first silent film shows his dedication to this art and we in turn are given a fun but necessary history lesson in filmmaking.

Unfortunately as this is a critical guide, I felt less of the impact of the movie and more of Klepper's own interpretations and opinions on film. While it would be unrealistic to think that all 646 movies would get an equal amount of page time, there are some movies he doesn't even explain the plot of, only telling us how good or bad it is based on the actors or how it's directed. Shouldn't we be allowed to make that judgment ourselves? It's impossible if we don't know what the movie's about. One glaring example of this is the 1925 version of "Ben-Hur", by which the 1959 multi-Oscar winner was based on. Most of the time in writing about this movie is Klepper describing his own disdain for the remake and how much better this version is, without listing very many valid examples why this is so. He does very little overall to highlight the positives of this movie, only telling us to watch it over the remake. I personally like both versions and would recommend both version, but considering the remade Ben-Hur is tied for holding the most Oscars in movie history I don't believe it should just be dismissed as a stupid remake because of all the controversy surrounding it. Tell me WHY I need to see the silent version, and not at the expense of an equally magnificent version.

This didn't bother me as much as the way Klepper played favorites with actors and directors. Halfway through the book I could easily idenitfy his two favorites: D.W. Griffith and Erich von Stroheim. Not only does he highlight multiple movies by both men (whereas in other cases he'll only highlight one movie of a prominent director), but he continuously repeats himself with each description, idolizing storytelling but mostly lavishing both men's works. It really bothered me that he wrote a lengthy description of "Birth of a Nation" and completely neglected to highlight the massive controversy of this movie and the negative impact it had on American society, only praising the compelling storytelling and cinematography. He completely ignored the impact of the movie by focusing on its cimematic context.

I guess this bothers me more because of the take he had on Charlie Chaplin and his movies. He makes it clear he's a somewhat fan of Chaplin but he detests the "little tramp" character. And because he detests this character he ignores a number of movies Chaplin made that involved the tramp character and those that he reviewed he ignored the context of the movie entirely to lambast Chaplin. "The Kid" and "Gold Rush" for example have reviews that completely downplay Chaplin's role in each movies success, only highlighting the achievements of the other actors and punctuating all the reviews with "I don't like the tramp", something in which he uses to give a masterpiece like "Gold Rush" a very low review. Unlike Griffith and the "Birth of a Nation", he ignores the context of Chaplin's movies and focuses on negatives that hardly anyone notices.

As for Erich von Stroheim, it almost seemed like to me that Klepper wants us to believe this man was a flawless filmmaker caught in the Hollywood wheel, when that clearly wasn't the case. As with the movie "Greed" Klepper presents studio producer Irving Thalberg as some heartless monster who cut the movie apart without considering the artistic aspects of the movie. Though Klepper briefly acknowledges it, Greed was seven hours long, cost the studio tons of money, and was completely unmarketable until Thalberg got hold of it. Klepper completely glosses over the fact that von Stroheim would burn through the studio's money constantly on EVERY movie he made and used his stardom to bully the studio and actors into getting what he wanted. But he made great movies and Thalberg was part of the studio and so he was OBVIOUSLY a bigger bully than von Stroheim.

It's impossible to highlight every single silent movie, but Robert Klepper obviously chose which movies to review. And it really bothered me that the basis of his list revolved around continuously praising those he favored (D.W. Griffith, Erich von Stroheim), downplaying the achievements of others (Charlie Chaplin, Clara Bow), or outright ignoring the achievements of others (Fritz Lang, William Haines) just to name a few.

Don't get me wrong; I don't hate this book. Thanks to this book I've been introduced to many fascinating silent films and I've become a strong fan of Rodolph Valentino. But I felt this would've fared better if it wasn't so riddled with Klepper's own biases. Let us decide which movies are good. And please, spend some time talking about more than the same two people.
Risa
I have owned "Silent Films, 1877-1996" for two years, and use it as a constant reference. (If you are a fan of TCM "Silent Sunday" or are a fan of silent movies and would like a guide to watching or purchasing silent film, this is the first reference to which I turn.) This does not cover absolutely every silent film, but there have been very few which I did not find information upon here. "Silent Films" also covers actors, directors, and other cinematographical information. The price tag is high, but for the silent movie buff it is indeed worth the price. I journal my silent movie viewings on its pages to keep a record. "Silent Films, 1877-1996" has gone from investment to treasure.
Related to Silent Films, 1877-1996: A Critical Guide to 646 Movies
1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die eBook
Fb2 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die ePub
American Silent Film (A History of the American film) eBook
Fb2 American Silent Film (A History of the American film) ePub
The Media in the Movies: A Catalog of American Journalism Films, 1900-1996 eBook
Fb2 The Media in the Movies: A Catalog of American Journalism Films, 1900-1996 ePub
Abraham Lincoln on Screen : A Filmography of Dramas and Documentaries Including Television, 1903-1998 eBook
Fb2 Abraham Lincoln on Screen : A Filmography of Dramas and Documentaries Including Television, 1903-1998 ePub
A Technological History of Motion Pictures and Television: An Anthology from the Pages of the Journal of the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers eBook
Fb2 A Technological History of Motion Pictures and Television: An Anthology from the Pages of the Journal of the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers ePub
The Emergence of Film Art: The Evolution and Development of the Motion Picture As an Art, from 1900 to the Present eBook
Fb2 The Emergence of Film Art: The Evolution and Development of the Motion Picture As an Art, from 1900 to the Present ePub
MacMillan Film Bibliography: A Critical Guide to the Literature of the Motion Picture eBook
Fb2 MacMillan Film Bibliography: A Critical Guide to the Literature of the Motion Picture ePub
The Braff Silent Short Film Working Papers: Over 25,000 Films, 1903-1929, Alphabetized and Indexed eBook
Fb2 The Braff Silent Short Film Working Papers: Over 25,000 Films, 1903-1929, Alphabetized and Indexed ePub
The A to Z of French Cinema (The A to Z Guide Series) eBook
Fb2 The A to Z of French Cinema (The A to Z Guide Series) ePub