» » Eye and Brain

Fb2 Eye and Brain ePub

by Richard L. Gregory

Category: Medicine
Subcategory: Medical Books
Author: Richard L. Gregory
ISBN: 0691048401
ISBN13: 978-0691048406
Language: English
Publisher: Princeton University Press; 4 edition (November 17, 1997)
Pages: 296
Fb2 eBook: 1688 kb
ePub eBook: 1460 kb
Digital formats: lrf azw mobi txt

The late British psychologist Richard Gregory (1923-2010) is well known for his work on perception, the psychology of seeing and his love of puns. TRANSCRIPT: "Eye and Brain", yes, that was fun.

The late British psychologist Richard Gregory (1923-2010) is well known for his work on perception, the psychology of seeing and his love of puns. He designed and directed the Special Senses Laboratory at Cambridge and published 'The Oxford Companion to the Mind'. Actually I could say that was one of my few successes actually.

Richard Gregory was born in London, the son of Christopher Clive Langton Gregory and his first wife Helen Patricia . One of his hobbies was punning (making puns).

Richard Gregory was born in London, the son of Christopher Clive Langton Gregory and his first wife Helen Patricia (née Gibson)  . In April 1993, he was the guest for BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs, where his favourite choice was Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 3. .

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Westminster And City News Newspaper Grenfell Support News Newspaper Northampton Herald And Post Newspaper Halesowen Chronicle Newspaper Harlow Star Newspaper Wharf Newspaper Shepherds Bush Chronicle Newspaper.

Richard Gregory offers clear explanations of how we see brightness, movement, color, and objects, and he.

Richard Gregory offers clear explanations of how we see brightness, movement, color, and objects, and he explores the phenomena of visual illusions to establish principles about how perception normally works and why it sometimes fails. Illusion continues to be a major theme in the book, which provides a comprehensive classification system.

In this book, Richard L. Gregory offers clear explanations of how we see brightness, movement, color, and objects, and he explores the phenomena of visual illusions to establish principles about how percepti. There are also sections on what babies see and how they learn to see, on motion perception, the relationship between vision and consciousness, and on the impact of new brain imaging techniques.

Richard Gregory offers clear explanations of how we see brightness. Richard Gregory is Emeritus Professor of Neuropsychology and former Director of the Brain and Perception Laboratory at the University of Bristol. He has carried out experiments on many aspects of perception described in this book and is the inventor of several optical instruments. He is also an FRS and an international personality in the media and public lecture circuit. He is a prolific author as well as an eminent scientist.

Since the publication of the first edition in 1966, Eye and Brain has established itself worldwide as an essential introduction to the basic phenomena of visual perception. In this book, Richard L. Gregory offers clear explanations of how we see brightness, movement, color, and objects, and he explores the phenomena of visual illusions to establish principles about how perception normally works and why it sometimes fails. Although successive editions have incorporated new discoveries and ideas, Gregory completely revised and updated the book for this publication, adding more than thirty new illustrations. The phenomena of illusion continue to be a major theme in the book, in which the author makes a new attempt to provide a comprehensive classification system. There are also new sections on what babies see and how they learn to see, on motion perception, and tantalizing glimpses of the relationship between vision and consciousness and of the impact of new brain imaging techniques. In addition, the presentation of the text and illustrations has been improved by the larger format and new page design. The thousands of readers of the previous editions of Eye and Brain will find this new revised edition even more attractive and enthralling.

Comments to eBook Eye and Brain
Mayno
This book does an excellent job of explaining the details of vision through various illustrations and examples. I highly recommend this book to people that have a curiosity about vision and why some things seem the way they do in terms of sight and perception. The book is written in more of a textbook format in which it defines many concepts prior to using the terms in the book; this also makes it an easier read for people not familiar with terms both related and associated to the eye and brain. I liked the structure of the book in which the future chapters of the book build upon the concepts and terms introduced in previous chapters. Gregory not only mentions many novel ideas, but he also explains how and who discovered these novel ideas. I thought the book was both entertaining and at the same time informative.
Gregory starts off the book by providing illustrations and examples of images in which the mind perceives a familiar object. One such illustration he uses to portray this is a picture filled with black blobs of ink randomly placed around the page except for a certain area (p.12). Even though there is not much of an outline of a Dalmatian dog, the mind makes a guess based on previous information and data it has collected from past experiences that this may be a dog. I thought this was a clever method that Gregory used to capture the reader and helped raise various questions about the process of forming hypotheses within the brain about the outside world.
After capturing the reader's attention, Gregory delves into the details of color and how the eye detects light and different colors via cones and rods. He explains in detail the experiments conducted by Sir Isaac Newton to discover the color spectrum. Also, Gregory establishes the foundations of the eye by describing its anatomy and the importance of each structure. Gregory mentions and also illustrates that the cones and rods which are used for light detection are actually placed in the back of the retina behind other cells, which could reduce the amount of light actually penetrating through the layers to reach the cones and rods. I enjoyed that Gregory consistently used the same format when writing the various chapters of the book; he defined and explained the basics and then built upon that in order to explain something that would otherwise have seem complicated such as the Muller-Lyer illusion (p.219).
After explaining the technicalities of the eye Gregory begins to define the second part to this book, which is the brain."...the brain was regarded as an unimportant organ, because in death it is bloodless and in life it is seldom felt by its owner."(p.67) I liked how Gregory first gives a very brief snapshot about the impressions of the brain in ancient history and how it was determined to be an important organ later in history. He illustrates the basic unit of the brain, which are nerve cells and how the action potentials are generated as well as carried out throughout the body. In this part of the book, Gregory identifies special cells in the brain associated with orientation of objects and movement of objects. He describes experiments that were conducted in which lines rotated at various angles were shown to a test subject and the recordings of action potentials were collected from the associated cells. Certain cells would fire more frequently when introduced to the line at a certain angle. The same methodology was used in identifying movement related cells in the brain.
Once the reader has acquired the necessary tools and background information for the associated jargon, Gregory brings up several interesting ideas and concepts. One such question he presents is, "Why does the world remain stable when we move our eyes?"(p.101). He explains this by stating that both the image-retina systems and the eye-head systems work together and cancel each other out, which results in a stable environment. Also, Gregory mentions that since our movement is active and is controlled by us, the brain can actively predict which direction or orientation we will be facing in the near future; the brain compensates for these movements as a result. One such example used to help understand this notion is the aspect of driving a car. The driver of the car knows in advance when and how they will turn the car or accelerate; for the driver the car ride would seem smooth to them. However, the passenger in the car would be sitting passively and would have no hindsight what so ever if the driver of the car drives aggressively; for the passenger the ride may not be at all considered a smooth ride. Throughout the book, Gregory tries to use explanations that are down to earth and easy to comprehend by the average reader and I believe this makes the reading that much more enjoyable.
In the later part of the book, Gregory begins to discuss distortions and illusions, which require the functions of both the eye and brain. He uses a tribe called the Zulus to help explain the affects of culture on depth perception. He reveals how the Zulu culture is surrounded by round objects instead of sharp curves and also living in the forests have mediated their perceptions of seeing at vast distances. Instead, many people from the Zulu tribe believe something that is far away as being small instead. I really enjoyed how Gregory used concepts, ideas, and examples from all around the world.
In another study that Gregory discusses, he explains how most of our learning from seeing is initially learned via touching. The study initially involved blind people that recently regained vision and required them to draw a bus. The drawing lacked many of the details of the bus. However, after the subject was allowed to touch the bus physically and was asked to draw the image of the bus again, many of the details that were not present in the first picture were now present.
"Depression in people recovering sight after many years of blindness is a common feature of these cases. Its cause... seems to be a realization of what they have missed..." (p.154) Reading the various studies Gregory mentions in his book, I truly came to appreciate the importance of vision. Gregory also mentions how some people from recovering sight are disappointed at what they actually see due to what they may have imagined something to look like before regaining vision. People recovering from sight that experience depression often tend to live in the dark and avoid light.
There were very few things that I did not enjoy from reading the book. One such thing was his somewhat poor explanation of the various categories of perception (p.228 - 230). Although he did use illustrations to help with his explanations, I believe he did not do as great of a job at explaining the differences between each category as he did in explaining concepts in other parts of the book.
Overall, I liked this book. It made think about vision in many different ways and it also engaged the reader by having illustrations and illusions in the book for the reader to test out. I thought the structure of the book was very well written in terms of introducing new concepts only after introducing the reader to some of the very basic terms and definitions first. Only word of advice I would provide to future readers is to look at the figures as soon as they are mentioned in the readings because this will help visualize the explanation Gregory provides in the text much more clearly. It's an excellent book to read every night right before going to bed!
Gldasiy
Very interesting.
CopamHuk
Absolutely a must read for anyone who wants to have a better understanding of our visual perception.
Hra
Pretty dry reading but good.
Levion
This book delves into many of the topics we all experience in seeing and understanding what we are looking at.
You will never take vision for granted again.
Winawel
It was a real thrill to also discover a lot about how our brain functions and about why we see optical illusions
Gogal
Since I am natural vission teacher the book is very helpful for me. I find a lot of answers to my questions
I ended up receiving the old cover of the book which is way cooler. Great read, awesome illustrative diagrams! People have stopped me on the subway to ask what I was reading
Related to Eye and Brain
Blindness and Brain Plasticity in Navigation and Object Perception eBook
Fb2 Blindness and Brain Plasticity in Navigation and Object Perception ePub
Seeing Motion (Edition Angewandte) eBook
Fb2 Seeing Motion (Edition Angewandte) ePub
Foundations of Sensation and Perception: Second Edition eBook
Fb2 Foundations of Sensation and Perception: Second Edition ePub
Eye and brain: The psychology of seeing eBook
Fb2 Eye and brain: The psychology of seeing ePub
Art and Visual Perception, a Psychology of the Creative Eye eBook
Fb2 Art and Visual Perception, a Psychology of the Creative Eye ePub
Perception and Photography eBook
Fb2 Perception and Photography ePub
Concepts and Mechanisms of Perception eBook
Fb2 Concepts and Mechanisms of Perception ePub
Brain and Perception: Holonomy and Structure in Figural Processing (Distinguished Lecture Series) eBook
Fb2 Brain and Perception: Holonomy and Structure in Figural Processing (Distinguished Lecture Series) ePub
Dynamics of Visual Motion Processing: Neuronal, Behavioral, and Computational Approaches eBook
Fb2 Dynamics of Visual Motion Processing: Neuronal, Behavioral, and Computational Approaches ePub