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Fb2 American Silent Film (A History of the American film) ePub

by William K. Everson

Category: Movies
Subcategory: Humour and Entertainment
Author: William K. Everson
ISBN: 019502348X
ISBN13: 978-0195023480
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (June 15, 1978)
Pages: 387
Fb2 eBook: 1554 kb
ePub eBook: 1485 kb
Digital formats: lrf lrf mbr lit

This book is often called the definitive written history of the silent film. While the book certainly has its merits, I do feel that some disclaimers do apply to that description of the book

Ships from and sold by sweethomeliquid2. This book is often called the definitive written history of the silent film. While the book certainly has its merits, I do feel that some disclaimers do apply to that description of the book. First off, virtually the entirety of the first 200 pages (over half the book) are about the films of D. W. Griffith. While Griffith was certainly a titan of the silent film era, at times it seems that the book would have been better titled "American Silent Film: The Works of .

American Silent Film book. A book one will gladly return to every so often. Praised as the best modern survey of the silent period (New.

The cinema of the United States, often metonymously referred to as Hollywood, has had a large effect on the film industry in general since the early 20th century

The cinema of the United States, often metonymously referred to as Hollywood, has had a large effect on the film industry in general since the early 20th century.

Her decade-long career covered the conclusion of the Silent Film era and the initiation of Talkies. Born Barbara Cloutman (some sources have the spelling as Klowtman) in Canada, she moved with her family to Southern California during her early teens Actress. Her decade-long career covered the conclusion of the Silent Film era and the initiation of Talkies.

The first Hollywood film and the era of silent films. In the suburbs of Los Angeles is the village of Hollywood. The pioneer in silent movies can be considered David Griffith

The first Hollywood film and the era of silent films. For filmmakers of the time, this was the perfect place to shoot. The pioneer in silent movies can be considered David Griffith. He was one of the most talented directors in the country and his students and followers also achieved a lot of success in this field. Griffith made a significant contribution to the history of American cinema - for 5 years of work, he made about 500 films. The appearance of film studios and the first sound film. By 20 years of the 20th century, Hollywood secured the title of the center of the American film industry.

Film Booking Offices of America (FBO), also known as FBO Pictures Corporation, was an American film studio of the silent era, a producer and distributor of mostly low-budget films. distribution business changed its name to Film Booking Offices of America, a banner under which R-C had released more than a dozen independent productions. Powers apparently changed the name of Robertson-Cole/FBO to the Powers Studio for a brief period, though there is no record of the company ever having produced or released a film under that banner. In 1923, the studio launched a series of boxing-themed shorts, Fighting Blood, starring George O'Hara.

The American film industry, often referred to as Hollywood (from the . Entrepreneurs began traveling to exhibit their films, bringing to the world the first forays into dramatic film making.

The American film industry, often referred to as Hollywood (from the place name of its birth), is the industry leader in the form of artistic expression that came to dominate the twentieth century and continues as a popular art form at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The history of American cinema is sometimes separated into four main periods: the silent era, Classical Hollywood cinema, New Hollywood, and the contemporary period (after 1980). Justus D. Barnes in Edwin S. Porter's The Great Train Robbery.

The film, nonetheless, became one of the greatest classics of American film history. Ever since the 1950s American films are divided more and more into two categories: blockbusters and independent films. Welles’ Macbeth (1948) was less successful and after its release the director left for Europe where he starred in Carol Reed’s film noir, The Third Man (1949). Film noir as a genre had its bloom in the 1940s. Studios tend to make expensive, star oriented, spectacular films whereas independent filmmakers are regarded to be more innovative and quality driven, as they do not depend on the studios’ money.

The History ofthe American Cinema has been conceived to provide just such a. .is book, the first in a multivolume history of American film, looks at the initial twelve years of cinema, from 1895 to the fall of 1907.

The History ofthe American Cinema has been conceived to provide just such a historical foundation. Here, cinema refers to projected motion pictures and their sound accompaniment, but two closely related developments must also be considered.

Intended for all scholars, students, and lovers of film, this book, which features over 150 film stills, provides an overview of this era in film history.
Comments to eBook American Silent Film (A History of the American film)
Skrimpak
This book is often called the definitive written history of the silent film. While the book certainly has its merits, I do feel that some disclaimers do apply to that description of the book.

First off, virtually the entirety of the first 200 pages (over half the book) are about the films of D. W. Griffith. While Griffith was certainly a titan of the silent film era, at times it seems that the book would have been better titled "American Silent Film: The Works of D.W. Griffith". Other directors are mentioned in passing, but usually only in comparison with Griffith. At times it seems that, in the eyes of the author, Griffith is the only truly noteworthy figure of the silent age. Upon visiting the author's Wikipedia page just now, it came as little surprise to discover that the author had chosen to name his own son "Griffith" - the author seems obsessed with Griffith, to the exclusion of nearly all else.

For example, silent comedy - every aspect of it, the films, the stars, the directors - is dispensed with in a single, 19 page chapter. But fear not, Griffith appears here as well, as when the author informs us that "The first major breakthrough came with... D.W. Griffith". While being shockingly dismissive of Mack Sennett in general, the author informs us that Sennett's editing was often "brilliant"... due to his films "reflecting Sennett's apprenticeship under Griffith". And we are informed that Sennett comedian Harry Langdon derived his "eloquent pantomime and his facial expressions" by painstakingly copying them from the "earlier Griffith" films.

Considering the lasting impact of silent comedians - virtually every single person on earth can still recognize Charlie Chaplin or Laurel and Hardy, but who among the general populace can name even a *single* non-comedic silent film or performer? - I feel that in a book that purports to outline the history of silent film, silent comedy deserves more than what, in essence, amounts to a throw-away chapter.

In other chapters, *major* developments in the world of motion pictures are given short shrift. The murder and rape trial of Roscoe Arbuckle, the murder of William Desmond Taylor, and the drug-related death of Wallace Reid - merit less than three pages in the book. Considering that these events lead directly to the implementation of the so-called Hays Code - and thus, the heavy handed bowdlerizing that would plague American films not just through the entire silent era, but for the next 38 years - it seems to me that these matters merit somewhat more than a passing mention in a historical overview of silent films - and certainly in comparison to other aspects of the book (cough, Griffith) that, if anything, or are overly examined.

Having said all of this, the chapters on Griffith are informative and well-written, if that's what you're looking for (though, as the other Amazon reviews have stated, a bit dry). However, if you are looking for an extremely well-written and researched, entertaining and well-rounded introduction to silent movies, I would strongly suggest reading The Parade's Gone By... by the noted film historian, Kevin Brownlow instead of this volume.
Yojin
This is one of the best surveys of the movie industry from its beginnings that covers the entire silent era which spanned from 1905 to 1928 and then the talkie movies took over from silent movies. The author discusses the work of great directors such as D.W. Griffith, Frank Borzage, John Ford, Erich von Stroheim, Josef von Sternberg, and King Vidor. The book also recognizes the work of performers such as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., Mary Pickford, Lillian Gish, Mae Marsh and numerous others. The book also discusses the movies under categories such as; comedies, Westerns, horror movies, gangster movies, love story and family dramas along with innovation and development in the areas of art direction, production, design, camera techniques and screen writing. The book is incredibly informative for anyone interested in the history and archeology of early American cinema.

A brief summary is as follows: The American movies flourish across the globe, and it all started in the wake of industrial revolution. The industry was built on firm foundation and it evolved rapidly when the movie making was still a fantasy of few dreamers and artists in Europe. This was before the first Nickelodeon opened in United States in 1905. When European countries were in the middle of war, the European movie businesses were badly hurt. In sensing that the competition is minimized, American movie businesses were strengthened and lead over European movie industry was lengthened considerably. This was the critical period when the American cinema achieved total mastery of the art of making movies, from screen writing to production and marketing of the product. Directors like Griffith, Stroheim, and Flaherty, Murnau, and Welles were mainly responsible for the artistic progressions, and technical and artistic innovations. They often used "A" stars like Rudolph Valentino, Mary Pickford, Colleen Moore, Clara Bow and Douglas Fairbanks for making box office hits. The revenue generated helped for more artistic experimentation and variety and creativity in Hollywood. Many less known directors during the silent era also made impressive movies, but not often box office hits. This list included; William Seiter, Irvin Willat, Harry Pollard, and Emory Johnson. In 1919 D.W. Griffith, Douglas Fairbanks, Charlie Chaplin and Mary Pickford formed United Artists to give themselves greater freedom in making movies and greater profits for their investments, which interested other investors to invest in movie business that helped Hollywood to grow at a faster rate.

Another key step Hollywood would take is to tap into European expertize during 1910s and 20s. There was a strong presence of imported directors and actors/actresses from the other side of the "pond." The early influences of Gustaf Molander, Ernst Lubitsch, Dmitri Buchovetski and F. W. Murnau in Hollywood were real and significant. In fact much of the important names in Swedish movie business had moved to Hollywood including Greta Garbo resulting in complete collapse of the Swedish movie industry.

The comedy films have a rich history in Hollywood. Hollywood greats such as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Mack Sennett, Harold Lloyd and Laurel & Hardy made great silent comedies. But talkie films brought new talents like W. C. Fields. It's a gift, Duck soup, Blessed event and Love me tonight are some of the finest comedies. The ultimate end of silent era was evident in 1926 with the making of Don Juan and more significantly The Jazz Singer in 1927.The silent industry was dying with much resistance from leading directors like Borzage, Ford, Stroheim, Sternberg, and King Vidor. They thought that would lessen the commercial value of Hollywood movies in European market and it would also destroy the unique form of art. Several leading actors and actresses supported that view. Greta Garbo was the last holdout because she was afraid that her heavy Swedish accent will not be accepted by American audience. Her last silent film "Kiss" was released in late 1929. The transition also kicked-in pretty strongly with stage directors like James Whale, George Cukor, John Cromwell, and Rouben Mamoulian. New performers from stage like James Cagney, Paul Muni, Humphrey Bogart, Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy made lasting impact on talkie movies. Lubitsch's "Trouble in Paradise" and Mamoulian's "Love me Tonight" restored all the elegance of silent era, but several talkie movies of 1930 and 1931 also made strong showing in keeping the artistic forms of the silent movies. It was at the end of 1931 that "Hollywood holdouts" realized that the end of silent era has just passed by.

This book contains a number of photographs about art direction, and still photographs of several stars of the silent days; they are immaculate and rare pictures to treasure. In the appendix section of the book, the author discusses several published books about the history of Hollywood, which are helpful for readers interested in American movie history. This is a great book to read and it is highly recommended.
Vizuru
Much is misunderstood about the history of silent films. Everson has throughly researched the era and writes not only as historian, but as film critic, revealing many classics of the cinema you may not have heard of. He is detailed in his assessment, writing with conviction and authority. There are many stills from films as well as portraits of stars. This is a must for film students, fans, critics, and for those who want to learn about culture from a bygone era. Everson begins with Edison, covering an era not touched before by many writers, going through the evolution of film art, up to and including the first sound films. Did you know "The Jazz Singer" was not the first talkie? There is also a chronology at the end of the book along with suggested readings. Though Everson died in 1996 this book is still relevant. Everson along with James Agee are perhaps the foremost writers on about film.
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