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Fb2 Flashman: A Novel ePub

by George MacDonald Fraser

Category: Humor
Subcategory: Humour and Entertainment
Author: George MacDonald Fraser
ISBN: 0452259614
ISBN13: 978-0452259614
Language: English
Publisher: Plume; Reissue edition (August 1, 1984)
Pages: 256
Fb2 eBook: 1120 kb
ePub eBook: 1818 kb
Digital formats: lit mbr rtf doc

George MacDonald Fraser was a bestselling historical novelist, journalist and screenwriter. He is perhaps most famous for his series of Flashman novels, featuring his antihero Harry Flashman.

George MacDonald Fraser was a bestselling historical novelist, journalist and screenwriter. In addition to his novels, he wrote numerous screenplays, most notably The Three Musketeers and the James Bond film Octopussy.

Shelve Flashman papers george macdonald fraser series 2 : 6 books collection se.

Shelve Flashman papers george macdonald fraser series 2 : 6 books collection set. Want to Read. Currently Reading Want to Read.

Flashman is a 1969 novel by George MacDonald Fraser. It is the first of the Flashman novels. Presented within the frame of the discovery of the supposedly historical Flashman Papers, this book chronicles the subsequent career of the bully Flashman from Tom Brown's School Days. The book begins with a fictional note explaining that the Flashman Papers were discovered in 1965 during a sale of household furniture in Ashby, Leicestershire.

In between writing Flashman novels, George MacDonald Fraser spent thirty years as an "incurably star struck" .

George MacDonald Fraser-beloved for his series of Flashman historical novels-offers an action-packed memoir of his experiences in Burma during World War II. Fraser was only 19 when he arrived there in the war's final year, and he offers a first-hand glimpse at the camaraderie, danger, and satisfactions of service.

The Flashman Novels (book series). George MacDonald Fraser (author). Anyone reading these novels should start with "Flashman," as that establishes the character and is a great novel. I have read and listened to every one in the series at least 10 times. What's the best novel in George MacDonald Fraser's The Flashman book series? Update Cancel. azzLMJdSYWLi xjbNyPIBnT qDeBW UrOoevBmfbIyAU roGMYiePosFnk. I think the best one is "Flashman and the Dragon.

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Flashman' by George MacDonald Fraser. The first of the wonderful Flashman series. A dashing coward who keeps finding himself the hero of every battle he tries to run away from. A book that manages to be both shamelessly racist and sexist and critical of racism and male chauvinism. First in The Flashman Papers (Series) - by George Macdonald Fraser. Possibly the best written, factual, and most exciting historical series ever penned.

George MacDonald Fraser served in a Highland regiment in India and the Middle East, worked on newspapers in Britain and Canada, and has written nine other Flashman novels and numerous films, most notably The Three Musketeers, The Four Musketeers, and the James Bond film.

George MacDonald Fraser served in a Highland regiment in India and the Middle East, worked on newspapers in Britain and Canada, and has written nine other Flashman novels and numerous films, most notably The Three Musketeers, The Four Musketeers, and the James Bond film, Octopussy.

George MacDonald Fraser, who has died aged 82, was the creator of Harry Flashman, one of the gems of. .The book was original and very funny, and it also, most unusually for a comic novel, gave readers a telling picture of life in England and the empire between 1839 and 1842.

George MacDonald Fraser, who has died aged 82, was the creator of Harry Flashman, one of the gems of the English comic novel.

The Pyrates A Swashbuckling Comic Novel. Fraser George MacDonald. Fraser, George MacDonald - Flashman and the Tiger.

"If ever there was a time when I felt that 'watcher-of-the-skies-when-a-new-planet' stuff, it was when I read the first Flashman."–P.G. WodehouseThe first novel in the Flashman series Fraser revives Flashman, a caddish bully from Tom Brown's Schooldays by Thomas Hughes, and relates Flashman’s adventures after he is expelled in drunken disgrace from Rugby school in the late 1830s. Flashy enlists in the Eleventh Light Dragoons and is promptly sent to India and Afghanistan, where despite his consistently cowardly behavior he always manages to come out on top. Flashman is an incorrigible anti-hero for the ages. This humorous adventure book will appeal to fans of historical fiction, military fiction, and British history as well as to fans of Clive Cussler, James Bond, and The Three Musketeers.
Comments to eBook Flashman: A Novel
Gogul
It is hard to believe that this first book of the Flashman series is now nearly 30 years old. Written as if it is an actual published memoir (later books put "a novel" on the cover, probably to protect the publisher from receiving annoying letters of shock and outrage from the truly ignorant and profoundly clueless). This is a book for lovers of historical fiction, military fiction, or British history, but will be enjoyed by those who otherwise would never read in these areas. They are books of humor, following a knave and poltroon -- Harry Flashman -- as he stumbles into many of the great events of the 19th century (often fleeing irate husbands). Events he has visted so far include Little Big Horn, the Chinese Boxer Rebellion, the Indian Mutiny, the American slave trade, and the Prussian court where he was forced to act as a royal imposter. To the world he is seen as a great heroic figure, a development that Flashman finds hilarious yet endlessly useful. This first book introduces the Flashman character, beginning with his being expelled from school, forced into the British Army, and suddenly finding himself in the midst of the disasterous British Afghan campaign. The only books that ever left me laughing harder were the original three books of what should have remained the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy "trilogy" by Douglas Adams. Highly recommended, though with this warning: reading this book and its successors will leave you considerably more educated about the important events of the last century without you even realizing it is happening
Enila
The Flashman novels are the "found" papers of a storied Victorian soldier, a hero of his age. In the course of his (mythical) adventures he meets up with other, genuine giants of the age. Every Flashman novel takes place during real, and epic, conflicts and feature real, historical figures. There's major action in these novels.

Flashman has three great talents. He is a superb horseman, which comes in handy when he's running away. He has a great facility with languages, which allows him to pass as a native when he's running away. And, he is completely honest in his memoirs. He knows he's a coward. He embraces it.

Flashman never rises to any occasion. He is not a gentleman. He WILL throw you under the bus. And yet ... and yet I adore him. I have to apologize to myself for it, but I think he's hilarious. His candid take on the icons of the age are gut funny. You root for him. He's as bad as he'll ever be in this first book, but if you catch the Flashman bug you are in for major treats.
Varshav
Oh boy, I’ve got to admit that I did love this one.
The last ‘unputdownable’ novel I read was Irvine Welsh’s ‘The Blade Artist’. Needless to say, 'Flashman' features an equally foul and notorious protagonist, whose depravity, shameless bullying and honourless scheming kept me reading on about his life in acute disbelief.
The fact that Flashman’s justification for his actions is often hilarious and at times insightful does not redeem him in any way. The fact that he is honest enough to openly and constantly admit that he is a cowardly, toadying rake does not redeem him either. After all, this is a character who is capable of carrying out incredible violence against women (and please don’t anyone utter the phrases ‘man of his time’ and / or ‘too much political correctness’).
Flashy's story serves as an unwavering, fascinating and repeated confirmation of the fact that the supposed heroes paraded by the establishment are often not the beacons of shining light which they’re declared to be. And most importantly of all: Flashy’s glaring flaws kept me reading on at a quick pace, for his enthralling magnetism was almost on par with Tolkien’s Gollum or Welsh’s Begbie, i.e. you just have to read on to find out what they’ll do next.
Despite his flaws, Flashy often provided a refreshingly honest account of the incredible events he lived through and his part in them. He was often quick to point out that the likes of Iqbal and Hudson were better men than him, and that he undeservedly profited from their actions. Indeed although I’m reluctant to admit it, Flashy’s self-awareness is the one quality about him that’s endearing (not redeeming). That said, I hardly ever felt sympathy for him whenever he found himself in a funk - I only read on in my impatience to discover how he would overcome his latest setback.
All of which makes Flashy a highly engaging character through which to discover the large-scale Afghan catastrophe which was caused by the likes of Macnaghten and Elfinstone. Their blunders could be considered hilarious had they not inflicted such unimaginable human misery upon their own side. So many great British soldiers were lost for nothing, and it seems incredible when you think how the Brits took over Afghanistan only to end up losing it so embarrassingly. Elfinstone must easily rank as the leading commander in military history for vacillating indecisiveness.
Incidentally I did some research on the Afghan puppet king, Shah Shujah, who the Brits installed in Kabul. Although this novel makes no bones about the savagery of the Afghan tribes, the savagery of the puppet King is not referred to. However his brutality was just jaw-dropping: a King power-hungry enough to have his own brother blinded, and who frequently insisted on mutilating (nose, ears, tongues, genitalia) his servants and courtiers for the slightest perceived misdeeds after he fled into exile.
Finally I should also add that Macdonald Fraser’s writing makes for easy reading, so that I never felt bogged down by the first person narrative. It’s amazing to think this novel was written in the sixties, given the author's brisk style which still manages to be literary and (by all accounts) historically accurate.
All in all a highly entertaining yarn but I will try to find something else to read before returning to Flashy’s world.
Daron
How had I never heard of these before? They’re pure fun. Harry Flashman is a fictional British military hero from the 19th century whose memoirs (The Flashman Papers) are discovered decades later. In them, Flashman writes of his adventuring in the Afghan military campaign, going toe-to-toe with Otto Von Bismarck, and rubbing elbows/seducing/offending other historical figures. Flashman is the worst kind of lead: misogynist, a coward, racist, womanizing, opportunistic, selfish, clever, and lucky. Each of the Flashman Papers follows roughly the same story arc: Flashman, whose life is privileged and character irredeemable, finds himself in progressively worse and worse circumstances—partially of his own creation, partially of bad luck—but always emerges the hero of the story. Every book is like watching in slow motion as a friend drives your car drunk, totals it into preschool, then walks away without a scratch. The books work somewhat because of that simple formula, but moreso because they are so, so well executed. They’re funny, rife with dry English humor and absurd characters. They’re also easy page turners, so good for travel or pool reading.
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