Fb2 Maria ePub

by Richard L. Spivey

Category: Crafts and Hobbies
Subcategory: Hobbies and Homemade
Author: Richard L. Spivey
ISBN: 0873584848
ISBN13: 978-0873584845
Language: English
Publisher: Northland Pub; Revised, Expanded, Subsequent edition (July 1, 1989)
Pages: 148
Fb2 eBook: 1344 kb
ePub eBook: 1326 kb
Digital formats: lit azw mbr doc

Richard L. Spivey is a recognized expert on contemporary Pueblo Indian pottery. He lives in Pebble Beach, California. I found the Spivey book entitled Maria to be a great asset to my library of books on Indian pottery

Richard L. I found the Spivey book entitled Maria to be a great asset to my library of books on Indian pottery. The multitude of close up pictures is very helpful in knowing the details of her pottery and that of her family. The easy to read narrative resulting from a personal relationship with Maria and others in the Pueblo make a very intimate kind of reading.

See if your friends have read any of Richard L Spivey's books. Richard L Spivey’s Followers. None yet. Richard L Spivey. Richard L Spivey’s books. Maria by. Richard L Spivey, Dennis Lyon (Introduction).

See all books authored by Richard L. Spivey, including Maria, and The Legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez, and more on ThriftBooks. Books By Richard L. Spivey. The Legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez. The Life and Art of Tony Da.

The legacy of Maria Poveka Martinez. Biography, Tewa pottery, Tewa women potters.

Maria, the potter of San Ildefonso (1887-1981), is not only the most famous of Pueblo Indian potters but ranks among the best of international potters. This lavishly illustrated book draws from Spivey's 1979 classic work. Her work Is collected and exhibited around the world, and more than any other artist, Maria Martinez brought 'signatures' to Indian art. She and other members of her family revived a dying art form and kindled a renaissance in pottery for all the Pueblos. She raised this regional art to one of international acclaim.

Library of Congress rigidly classifies this as NK3700, "ceramics".

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Library of Congress rigidly classifies this as NK3700.

Basic Concept Mini-Books by Becky L. Spivey Paperback.

Second edition of a fine celebration in text and photos of the greatest of American Indian potters. (Library of Congress rigidly classifies this as NK3700, "ceramics".) Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.
Comments to eBook Maria
Dikus
So happy to find this book.
Cherry The Countess
Richard Spivey's large-format book, MARIA, serves as an excellent visual and textual appreciation of the pottery of Maria Martinez, the famous Native American artist of San Ildefonso pueblo in New Mexico. Numerous full-page color photographs of her pottery and B/W photos of Maria at work with her husband and son provide a feast for the eyes. You can almost feel the smoothness of the pottery eased into being by her creative hands. Much of the text is taken from oral interviews and reminiscences by Maria herself, who died in 1980 at the age of 93. In 1907 Dr. Edgar L. Hewett of the School of American Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico began excavating prehistoric Pueblo sites near San Ildefonso pueblo. Julian Martinez was hired as one of the laborers in the dig. When his wife Maria saw the shards of ancient pottery being unearthed, she was delighted by the designs. Dr. Hewett asked her to try to reproduce the polychrome pottery with those designs and was amazed by the beauty of her work when he returned the next archeological season. Julian had helped by painting traditional designs on his wife's new pottery. Dr. Hewett bought practically everything they had made. From that moment on Maria and Julian dedicated themselves to pottery. Over the next few decades, as tourism increased in New Mexico, Maria's fame spread and potters in other pueblos took up the nearly forgotten ancient art. Maria had been attempting to create pottery since the age of seven. There were still two excellent potters in her pueblo (Martina Montoya and Nicolasa Pena Montoya), who encouraged the little girl in her initial efforts. Their pottery was, as it had always been, beautiful utilitarian pieces -- plates, cups for atole, bowls for mixing chili or soup or dough, cooking pots, and large jars in which to wash hair. Clay "ollas" stood outdoors to collect rainwater. Pottery was traded in other pueblos for wheat, corn, or chile, but never for money. However, Maria's pottery would change all that. Over a 40-year period Julian and Maria shared their labor. Julian gathered clay from the earth. Maria prepared the clay, coiled it, shaped it into pottery, smoothed, and fired the completed pots. Then she polished them with stone or sandpaper. Finally Julian would paint symbolic designs around the piece. He became the leading pottery decorator and she the leading potter of her pueblo. Encouraged by the Museum of New Mexico to continue spending more time on fewer but higher quality pieces, Maria and Julian produced exquisite shapes and designs, which included clouds, butterflies, plumed serpents (avanyu), feathers, plants, clouds, turkeys, kiva steps (ceremonial underground centers), and geometric designs. In 1919 Maria began experimenting with her soon-to-be famous matte-black-on-polished-black ware. After perfecting the right combination of matte and polish accompanied by her husband's designs, Maria unselfishly shared her secrets with other potters. The first Santa Fe Indian Market was held in 1922 under the direction of the School of American Research with all New Mexico pueblos represented. "Native clays, pigments, and traditional methods were required in order to participate in the market." Maria began to win the first of many prizes. In 1924 a bridge was built across the Rio Grande near San Ildefonso and tourists came to the pueblo to buy directly from the potters. Withdrawing from its physical isolation, San Ildefonso became "one of the most progressive arts and crafts centers" among Rio Grande River pueblos. Maria and Julian were the primary causes of this new prosperity. Living standards rose in San Ildefonso and other pueblos where arts and crafts were practiced. Income from pottery began to exceed that of agriculture. Domestic problems declined. New houses were built. Maria began teaching classes at the Indian School in Santa Fe. When her husband died in 1943, Maria turned to her daughter-in-law Santana to paint the designs on her pottery. In 1948 Maria's son, Popovi Da ("Red Fox") opened the Popovi Da Studio of Indian Art at San Ildefonso to display and sell outstanding examples of his mother's and other pueblo artists' work. In 1950 he began assisting in the painting of some of his mother's pots. In 1956, after a highly successful partnership with Santana, Maria began working solely with her son Popovi Da ("Red Fox"). He wanted to carry the art further and began experimenting with new designs ("new colors and combinations of colors, new finishes, and a higher level of perfection.") He respectfully intended to wait until his mother's retirement before branching out completely on his own, but his early death prevented our seeing where he would have taken his art. "Gunmetal" silver was one of the new finishes he added to pottery. He was first to add a bit of turquoise to a piece, also. Skunks became a favorite motif that he worked into his designs. After the death of both Popovi Da and Maria, grandson Tony Da picked up the family tradition of pottery and has carried the art even further into modern designs and styles. This beautiful book serves as an excellent visual and textual overview of Maria's exquisite pottery still unmatched in its fine lines, graceful shapes, and simplicity. As an introduction, there is a moving speech ("Indian Pottery and Indian Values") given in 1969 by Maria's son and fellow potter, Popovi Da, at the School of American Research before his untimely death in 1971.
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