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Fb2 A History of Islamic Law (The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys) ePub

by Noel Coulson

Category: World
Subcategory: History books
Author: Noel Coulson
ISBN: 0748605142
ISBN13: 978-0748605149
Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press; Revised ed. edition (January 1, 1984)
Pages: 272
Fb2 eBook: 1375 kb
ePub eBook: 1406 kb
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Hallaq challenges this by arguing that Shafi'i had not nearly worked out a complete system.

History of Islamic Law book. History of Islamic Law (The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys). The classic introduction to Islamic law, tracing its development from its origins, through the medieval period, to its place in modern Islam.

A History of Islamic Law book. Paperback, 272 pages. A History of Islamic Law (Islamic Surveys). Published January 1st 1984 by Edinburgh University Press. 0748605142 (ISBN13: 9780748605149).

Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Volume 28 Issue 1. N. J. Coulson

Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Coulson: English Français. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Coulson: A history of Islamic law. (Islamic Surveys, . viii, 264 pp. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press,.

Part Three ISLAMIC LAW IN MODERN TIMES Foreign Influences: The Reception of European Laws Administration of Shari' a Law in Contemporary Islam

Professor ofOrientalLaws at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University ofLondon. Of Gray's Inn, Barrister-at-Law. Sometime Scholar ofKeble College, Oxford. EDINBURGH at the UniYersity Press. FOREWORD Noel . oulson I964 EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY PRESS 22. George Square, Edinburgh. Part Three ISLAMIC LAW IN MODERN TIMES Foreign Influences: The Reception of European Laws Administration of Shari' a Law in Contemporary Islam. 149. 13 Taqlid and Legal Reform.

item 3 A History of Islamic Law (Delete (Islamic Surveys)) (Is - Paperback NEW Coulson, -A History of. .Sociology & Anthropology: Professional. The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys.

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item 3 A History of Islamic Law (The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys) by Noel J. Coulson -A.This reissue describes the complete history of Islamic jurisprudence from its origins, through the Medieval period, to modern times

item 3 A History of Islamic Law (The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys) by Noel J. Coulson -A History of Islamic Law (The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys) by Noel J. Coulson. This reissue describes the complete history of Islamic jurisprudence from its origins, through the Medieval period, to modern times. The work demonstrates how, although religious law lies at the heart of Islamic culture, Islamic states have recently modified the law to meet society's changing values. The author considers the problems of such legal reform, referring to a wide variety of substantive legal rules and institutions.

The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys. A History of Islamic Law. Noel Coulson.

Islamic law - History. Edinburgh : University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;.

A history of Islamic law. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1964. Homicide in Islamic law', in Dictionary of the Middle Ages. Vol. vi. New York: Scribners, 1985

A history of Islamic law. The concept of progress and Islamic law', Quest, 40, 1964, 16-25. e., Readings on Islam in South-East Asia, Singapore: ISEAS, 1985. ' Legal education and Islamic law', Journal of the Centre of Islamic Legal Studies, 1, 1966, 3-11. New York: Scribners, 1985

The classic introduction to Islamic law, tracing its development from its origins, through the medieval period, to its place in modern Islam.
Comments to eBook A History of Islamic Law (The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys)
Gelgen
Writing an introduction to Islamic law for Western audiences is a difficult task, because such a project involves not only clear and succinct explanations of some technical legal doctrines, but also a history of early Islam as well as constant use of unfamiliar terms. To my mind, Coulson succeeded about as well as could be expected, in addition to advancing some important new academic theories.

In order to see the value of this work, you might compare it to its nearest competitors. Ignaz Goldziher's Introduction to Islamic Theology and Law (Modern Classics in Near Eastern Studies) is really the ur-text of modern western writing on the topic, but really is not about Islamic LAW strictly speaking: it is a broad survey of Islamic theology and civilization. Overall, it is truly a masterpiece of synthesis and analysis, but it doesn't do what Coulson does. Joseph Schacht's An Introduction to Islamic Law (Clarendon Paperbacks) is boring and pedantic, not to mention simply wrong in what it asserts. Wael Hallaq's A History of Islamic Legal Theories: An Introduction to Sunni usul al-fiqh is superb scholarship, but perhaps a little too advanced for someone trying to get an introductory sense of Islamic Law. It is better to read Hallaq's work AFTER Coulson. And my colleague Khaled Abou El Fadl's Speaking in God's Name: Islamic Law, Authority and Women is terrific and pathbreaking, but it is also not an introduction: instead, it is the beginning of a new comprehensive theory of Islamic jurisprudence. It is vital, but should be read afterwards.

That leaves us with Coulson, which is actually quite a bit. For dealing with such a technical area, he writes clearly and well. Other reviewers are right to suggest that sometimes he gets mired too much in details, but to some extent that is unavoidable. He argues about a trend, and then wants to show you an example. At some level, you just have to wade through, but Coulson does it about as painlessly as has been done so far.

That said, there are two main problems with this book, which any reader needs to know.

First, it is very outdated, despite what the book's publisher might claim. There is virtually nothing about developments since the early 1960's, which is particularly inexcusable since Coulson died in 1986 and probably could have included critical material concerning the Iranian revolution and the emergence of Wahhabi dominance in many areas of Islam.

Second, two of Coulson's principal theories have been severely challenged, most prominently (and to my relatively uneducated mind, persuasively) by Hallaq. Coulson argues that Ibn-Idris ash-Shafi'i was the "master architect" of Islamic law because Shafi'i developed a system for integrating Hadith (traditions of the Prophet) with Qiyas (analogical reasoning). Hallaq challenges this by arguing that Shafi'i had not nearly worked out a complete system. Coulson also argues that "the door of Ijtihad" (the exercise of human reason to find a principle of law) was closed by the 11th century CE, and that Islamic Law because crimped and overly conservative by then.

Hallaq and Abou El Fadl vigorously and successfully challenge this, and present compelling evidence of creative, reasoned jurisprudence centuries afterwards. They want to argue that current Islamic law has ample room for creative thought; updating Islamic law according to modern conditions, they contend, is not breaking with tradition but actually adhering to it. The 900-pound gorilla in the room is Wahhabism, which Abou El Fadl in particular sees as a perversion of the tradition, not its culmination. Coulson would have agreed on where the law should go, and in fact at the end of his book calls for "neo-Ijtihad." His difference with Abou El Fadl is that he says that this is a more radical step.

So in all, this is still the best introduction around. Just be aware of its flaws, and definitely follow up with other work.
Xtani
Thanks.
Weernis
More of an introduction to Islamic law than a history of it. This book is also seriously lacking and a little dated. The basic context of the book is the development of a system of law that has expanded from its 'primative' boundries to coming into contact with complex societies such as the Persians and Byzantines to a peak of the 11th centures when the four schools were truly codified to the so called 'stagnation and decline' The book then moves on to the contact with European laws through loss of teritorry and colonial expansion. The impression throughout this part of the book is 'Islamic law became outdated, for 'humanitarian reasons' people would be horrified by amputated hands and stoning of people so western laws were adopted, with the exeption of Saudi Arabia, Northern Nigeria and Afghanistan.

The book simply does not cover the issues here as to why western laws were adopted. It is far too simplisitic to simply go on about amputeted hands and stoning as though that is all Islamic law consists of (It would be a bit like saying all US law consists of is gassing, injecting or electricuting prisoners)

This is simply not an honest study of the development of Islamic law but rather a dated skim over of history. I suppose you couldnt expect much from a book consisting of only 264 pages to cover around 1400 years of history but this is pretty poor. Especially considering this is on most reading lists in Universities.
Anarus
I read this book as part of a class on Islamic Law, but could not even finish (and I am a law student, so I am used to reading long, boring documents). The problem with the book is that it lacks focus, and talks vaguely about historical developments in Islamic law and changes in jurisprudence, but wanders into discourses on inheritance law or other features. She rarely mentions the political context of the era except to assume all Islamic leaders were absolute tyrants. If this was supposed to be a history, it should have tracked the development of the schools and legal thought with the political/social/historical context. Instead, for the most part, it reads like a jumble of observations on evolving Islamic jurisprudence.
Olelifan
If you do not know the enemy then you will perish by his sword. The Muslims are the enemy. They are among you now, and working to control your world. Read, get smart, share what you learn with your family and friends. Do not believe the the warm and fuzzy portrayal of their culture via the TV news.
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