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Fb2 Civilization ePub

by Kenneth Clark

Category: World
Subcategory: History books
Author: Kenneth Clark
ISBN: 0719519330
ISBN13: 978-0719519338
Language: English
Publisher: British Broadcasting Corporation; First Edition edition (1969)
Pages: 359
Fb2 eBook: 1937 kb
ePub eBook: 1573 kb
Digital formats: mbr doc lit lrf

Civilisation-in full, Civilisation: A Personal View by Kenneth Clark-is a television documentary series written and presented by the art historian Kenneth Clark.

Civilisation-in full, Civilisation: A Personal View by Kenneth Clark-is a television documentary series written and presented by the art historian Kenneth Clark. The thirteen programmes in the series outline the history of Western art, architecture and philosophy since the Dark Ages. The series was produced by the BBC and aired in 1969 on BBC2. Then, and in later transmissions in Britain, the US and other countries it reached an unprecedented number of viewers for an art series

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Kenneth Clark's sweeping narrative looks at how Western Europe evolved in the wake of the collapse of the Roman Empire.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Kenneth Clark's sweeping narrative looks at how Western Europe evolved in the wake of the collapse of the Roman Empire, to produce the ideas, books, buildings, works of art and great individuals that make up our civilisation.

Kenneth Clark's sweeping narrative looks at how Western Europe evolved in the wake of the collapse of the Roman Empire, to produce the ideas, books, buildings, works of art and great individuals that make up our civilisation

Kenneth Clark's sweeping narrative looks at how Western Europe evolved in the wake of the collapse of the Roman Empire, to produce the ideas, books, buildings, works of art and great individuals that make up our civilisation. The author takes us from Iona in the ninth century to France in the twelfth, from Florence to Urbino, from Germany to Rome, England, Holland and America. Against these historical backgrounds he sketches an extraordinary cast of characters - the men and women who gave new energy to civilisation and expanded our understanding of the world and of ourselves.

Kenneth Clark's Civilisation.

CIVILISATION: A PERSONAL VIEW With Kenneth Clark. 1. The Skin of our Teeth - In this the first episode Clark travels from Byzantine Ravenna to the Celtic Hebrides, from the Norway of the Vikings to Charlemagne's chapel at Aachen, telling his story of the Dark Ages; the six centuries following the collapse of the Roman Empire. Kenneth Clark's 13-part series produced by British Broadcasting Corporation's Channel 2 (BBC-2) in 1969 and released in the United States in 1970 on public television, remains a milestone in the history of arts television, the Public Broadcasting System, and the explication of high culture to interested laypeople.

Kenneth Clark aged into a monument, as venerable and as archly defensive as the castle in Kent where he lived with his antiquarian library and his private museum of paintings. When his televised Grand Tour of the European Patrimony earned him a life peerage, he was nicknamed Lord Clark of Civilisation (which an envious colleague altered to Lord Clark of Trivialisation). Retiring to a custom-built bungalow modelled on a Japanese imperial pavilion, he moaned that he had dwindled into Lord Clark of suburbia: his new home in the castle grounds was so déclassé that you could hear the traffic.

Kenneth Clark (1903–83) often gave the impression that he had descended from Olympus, which gave him a slightly . In Civilisation, Clark was fond of generalisations of a slightly jaw-dropping kind. Great movements in the arts, like revolutions, don’t last for more than 15 years.

Kenneth Clark (1903–83) often gave the impression that he had descended from Olympus, which gave him a slightly comic air of patrician remoteness. Private Eye persisted in dubbing him ‘Lord Clark of Civilisation’, and the name somehow seemed much more appropriate than the title he actually selected (‘Baron Clark of Saltwood in the County of Kent’). Chartres Cathedral was ‘one of the two most beautiful covered spaces in the world (the other is St Sophia in Constantinople)’.

The history and culture of Western civilization are explored in a study of Western man's creative endeavors. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
Comments to eBook Civilization
Gugrel
As well stated by multiple reviewers before me, Kenneth Clark's BBC series "Civilisation," available on DVD, and in book form in the illustrated 1969 edition, is beyond superb. It really rates seven or eight out of five stars.

If you had to have just one "art" book in your personal library, this is it. Nothing like it exists that links western art to history and culture, or does so as sagely. It is clearly and extraordinarily well written as well.

Incidentally, a wonderful mate to "Civilisation" the book is the print version of Jacob Bronowski's BBC series "The Ascent of Man." "The Ascent of Man" was inspired in part by Clark's series, but looks at western culture from the perspective of mathematics and science as opposed to art and architecture.
SadLendy
Kenneth Clark's TV series "Civilisation" first arrived on British television, bringing him justly great fame and a lifetime peerage. This book was derived from that series, and is an excellent presentation of the story of the development of civilization in the Western world, mainly. He uses art--in its various manifestations--to develop the story line. If you saw the BBC series on PBS in the US, you will know how effectively he communicates important ideas. This book is a great companion in which to linger over the ideas that fly by in the video version.
Iaiastta
This edition does not have any illustrations which are very
important to the understanding of the text. Do not believe
that was stated.
Nejind
I recently purchased this book, Civilisation by Kenneth Clark, in hard cover from Amazon. It replaced a worn paper back edition I had purchased some forty years ago, at the advent of its premiere printing.
I took that paper back version with me to Europe, when I studied there as a Fulbright Scholar.
I have studied this book with religious persistence over decades. It remains for me as a book which is kin to a bible, if you will.
Civilisation,itself, is a fragile idea, and an easily exploited value. To realize the author's uncanny perception and insight, manifested throughout the book, is a riveting and mind altering experience.
I feel proud and satisfied to own a hard cover edition of this treasured book, and I desire for others to study it, too, and develop a firmer understanding, and perhaps be able to better recognize the qualities of a civilized life-style.
Ndlaitha
Kenneth Clark's PBS television series, from which this book is written, is a classic in early public broadcasting. Someone needs to re-master it in Blu Ray, but it would probably have only a limited buying public. Too bad. Art defines history, and in this case, history is presented through art. The book cannot do the series justice.
Purestone
I saw this series when it was first broadcast. I continue to be overwhelmed by the breadth of artistic achievement depicted in the video. Clark was a genius of art history and relates the major artists and movements to their times. If you watch this video and retain only ten percent of the details, you will know far more than hardly anyone about art of the Western World.
Twentyfirstfinger
The call to appreciate the past and remain confident in ourselves in 1969 still rings true for the challenges of today. Great book and return to it often, especially the last page pf the book, starting from the "stick in the mud" passage.
From what I know of the current generation of 0 to 30+ somethings, Kenneth Clark is probably all but forgotten and perhaps, to the few who do know him, a bit off putting. The latter because he speaks as a civilized man, as a gentleman; which they are likely to assume is a form of elitism or snobbishness. They have been taught the race, class, gender perspective of history and Western history and civilization in particular. They know about Rigoberta Menchu, Western racism, "inequality," and would find scant motivation in Clark's opening chapters about how "Western Civ" almost "bit it" but was saved by Charlemagne (the "guy" whose bust appears on the picture) oh!...some thousand years or more ago. "F*** Western civ!, is that guy supposed to be like what?...relevant or something?" If the name Charlemagne perks any awareness at all, it is likely because it is resonant with that of a newly arrived competitor of Beyoncé or as the appellation of an alternative band (Kings of Leon?). Making things more difficult is Clark's "going into position" that he is speaking to an audience who are not navel gazers, who haven't been saturated with self-help and self-esteem; who still had the notion that there could be heroes and epic events that--yes, though they happened centuries ago--are more interesting (and important) than themselves. He was convinced that the progress of Western civilization matters and is best portrayed by her art. Says the youngish person today, "Yeah, but I'm not an art major!" Well, I admit that by today's standards the sophistication of Clark's language and assumed base of knowledge may actually constitute "course material" for the average contemporary mind. They also may find it disconcerting that Clark reveals his love for his subject not as a professional (which title he could have certainly have laid claim to) but as an amateur. He pursued his life's work not as a great career opportunity but as one who loved to be among the things he loved; who, if required, would have given up his "estates" to continue to be with them. Kenneth Clark is also a bit donnish in his presentation, reminding us of a bygone time when university faculties consisted of men in tweeds talking and debating in the combination room, such has been portrayed by C. P. Snow in "The Masters" or as represented by the older faculty in C. S. Lewis' "That Hideous Strength". I recommend this book not only for its intriguing presentation of Western civilization but also as a portal leading to an older idea of scholarship whose loss has been to the impoverishment of all those who seek wisdom along with knowledge.
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