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Fb2 Women, Men, and Spiritual Power: Female Saints and Their Male Collaborators (Gender, Theory, and Religion) ePub

by John Coakley

Category: World
Subcategory: History books
Author: John Coakley
ISBN: 0231134002
ISBN13: 978-0231134002
Language: English
Publisher: Columbia University Press (January 18, 2006)
Pages: 368
Fb2 eBook: 1422 kb
ePub eBook: 1375 kb
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examination of spiritual friendships between women and men is lucidly written and solidly argued.

Donna Trembinski Canadian Journal of History). Coakley's elegant study belongs in every medievalist's library. examination of spiritual friendships between women and men is lucidly written and solidly argued. Journal of Religion). artful analysis (Patricia Z. Beckman Church History).

Gender, Theory, and Religion series. Women and Gender in North American Religions. New York: Syracuse University Press, 2000. New York, Columbia University Press, 2006. Article in Canadian Journal of History 41(3):541-543 · December 2006 with 5 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Volume 72 Issue 2 - Joan Waugh.

Women, Men, and Spiritual Power: Female Saints and Their Male Collaborators (Gender, Theory, and Religion). Download (pdf, . 8 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

Both men and women who practiced paganism in ancient civilizations such as Rome and Greece worshiped male and female . Many Pagan religions place an emphasis on female divine energy which is manifested as The Goddess

Both men and women who practiced paganism in ancient civilizations such as Rome and Greece worshiped male and female deities, but goddesses played a much larger role in women's lives. Roman and Greek goddesses' domains often aligned with culturally specific gender expectations at the time which served to perpetrate them in many cases. Many Pagan religions place an emphasis on female divine energy which is manifested as The Goddess. The consensus is unclear on what is considered female and male.

Coakley's work also undermines In Women, Men, and Spiritual Power, John Coakley explores male-authored .

Coakley's work also undermines In Women, Men, and Spiritual Power, John Coakley explores male-authored narratives of the lives of Catherine of Siena, Hildegard of Bingen, Angela of Foligno, and six other female prophets or mystics of the late Middle Ages. His readings reveal the complex personal and literary relationships between these women and the clerics who wrote about them. Coakley argues that they viewed these relationships as gendered partnerships that brought together female mystical power and male ecclesiastical authority without placing one above the other.

In Women, Men, and Spiritual Power, John Coakley explores male-authored narratives of the lives of Catherine of Siena, Hildegard of Bingen, Angela of Foligno, and six other female prophets or mystics of the late Middle Ages.

Similar books and articles. Observation on Female in Male Perspectives-A Reading of Lu Xun's Grieve over Death and Ye Shengtao's Ni Huanzhi. Female Coital Orgasm and Male Attractiveness. Women, Men and Spiritual Power: Female Saints and Their Male Collaborators. Jian-Long Yang - 2005 - Nankai University (Philosophy and Social Sciences) 5:34-39. The Obdurate Persistence of Rationalism. Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford, Gregory J. LeBlanc, April L. Bleske, Harald A. Euler & Sabine Hoier - 2000 - Human Nature 11 (3):299-306. The Ideal Yet Incomplete Female Image-The Molding of Female Image in Kung-Dow-I-She.

Female Saints and Their Male Collaborators (Gender, Theory, and Religion). Published December 23, 2005 by Columbia University Press.

Coakley argues that they viewed these relationships as gendered partnerships that brought together female mystical power and male ecclesiastical authority without placing one above the other. The men's writings reflect an extended moment in western Christianity when clerics had enough confidence in their authority to actually question its limits. After about 1400, however, clerics underwent a crisis of confidence, and such a questioning of institutional power was no longer considered safe. Instead of seeing women as partners, their revelatory powers began to be viewed as evidence of witchcraft.

In Women, Men, and Spiritual Power, John Coakley explores male-authored narratives of the lives of Catherine of Siena, Hildegard of Bingen, Angela of Foligno, and six other female prophets or mystics of the late Middle Ages. His readings reveal the complex personal and literary relationships between these women and the clerics who wrote about them. Coakley's work also undermines simplistic characterizations of male control over women, offering an important contribution to medieval religious history.Coakley shows that these male-female relationships were marked by a fundamental tension between power and fascination: the priests and monks were supposed to hold authority over the women entrusted to their care, but they often switched roles, as the men became captivated with the women's spiritual gifts. In narratives of such women, the male authors reflect directly on the relationship between the women's powers and their own. Coakley argues that they viewed these relationships as gendered partnerships that brought together female mystical power and male ecclesiastical authority without placing one above the other. Women, Men, and Spiritual Power chronicles a wide-ranging experiment in the balance of formal and informal powers, in which it was assumed to be thoroughly imaginable for both sorts of authority, in their distinctly gendered terms, to coexist and build on each other. The men's writings reflect an extended moment in western Christianity when clerics had enough confidence in their authority to actually question its limits. After about 1400, however, clerics underwent a crisis of confidence, and such a questioning of institutional power was no longer considered safe. Instead of seeing women as partners, their revelatory powers began to be viewed as evidence of witchcraft.
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