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Fb2 The Plantagenet Chronicles ePub

by Elizabeth (ed) Hallam

Category: Europe
Subcategory: History books
Author: Elizabeth (ed) Hallam
ISBN: 0297790137
ISBN13: 978-0297790136
Language: English
Publisher: Weidenfeld and Nicolson; 1st edition (1986)
Pages: 352
Fb2 eBook: 1828 kb
ePub eBook: 1385 kb
Digital formats: lrf azw doc txt

This book is in good condition, Ex-library book with a library pocket on last page.

ISBN 10: 1555840183, ISBN 13: 9781555840181. This book is in good condition, Ex-library book with a library pocket on last page.

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If much of "The Plantagenet Chronicles" leads us through the building of King Henry's empire, the closing chapters tearĀ . The Plantagenet Chronicles" is a wonderful source-book. Its text offers strong doses of human foibles that thread through a rich tapestry of superb, well-chosen illustrations.

If much of "The Plantagenet Chronicles" leads us through the building of King Henry's empire, the closing chapters tear that empire down: the book draws to a close after the barons forced the Magna Carta on King John, just after the fates of France and England were finally severed and torn apart. The temper of the Chronicles is constant: immense events interweave with and surrender space to the mundane and the trite. Robert Fripp, Author, "Power of a Woman.

Hallam, Elizabeth M. (1986). Domesday Book through Nine Centuries. Hallam, Elizabeth M. (2000) Hallam, Elizabeth . Bates, David, eds. London: Thames & Hudson. (1996). The Chronicles of the Wars of the Roses. (2000). Chronicles of the Age of Chivalry: the Plantagenet dynasty from 1216 to 1377: Henry III and the three Edwards, the era of the Black Prince and the Black Death. Hallam, Elizabeth . (2001).

A rich human tapestry from a distant time. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. The wonder is that the components of this book were written by a host of contributors, many working a thousand years ago and centuries apart.

Hallam, Elizabeth M, eds. The Plantagenet Chronicles. New York : Weidenfeld And Nicolson, 198. Print. Names: Hallam, Elizabeth M. Published: New York : Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1986.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Plantagenet Chronicles by Elizabeth M. Hallam (Hardback) at the best online prices at. .

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal. No highlighting of text, no writing in the margins, and no missing pages.

This book chronicles the Planagenet era from 1154 to 1216 of English and French history. Medieval Europe's most tempestuous family, Henry II and his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Richard the Lionheart and his brother King John as seen through the eyes of their contemporaries. Beautiful illustrations and over 100 short essays.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Elizabeth M Hallam books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. The Plantagenet Encyclopedia.

Examines the reigns of Henry II, Richard I, and King John, and discusses the Magna Carta, the Crusades, and life in twelfth-century England
Comments to eBook The Plantagenet Chronicles
Uste
Love it and explain my family heritage more
Cildorais
The chronicles are beautifully produced using full reports from ancient chronicles in modern Englishaccompanied by great illustrations and pictures of relics, with well-written articles on e.g. Farming, cooking, medicinal herbs etc of the time.
I recommend the books to anyone interested in the history of one's own countries (I include Most of France, of course)
Runehammer
This rare book was a great find. It is really hard to find translations of the chroniclers from the middle ages, and this has the beefy points that you want to read if you are trying to do some research.
Vutaur
Excellent read, beautifully presented!
Fek
Did a family tree and found out I am a decendant of this family,it is great finding a book I can read about my ancestors.their reign,their life and tribulations.
Urtte
The wonder is that the components of this book were written by a host of contributors, many working a thousand years ago and centuries apart. Yet, in the careful hands of its translators and editors, "The Plantagenet Chronicles" brings us a cogent record of two and a half critical centuries. On the whole the original contributors managed to avoid self-consciousness--although self-righteousness was another matter. Many of the Chronicles' entries began life as personal letters. Great events of the day mixed with gossip and the trivia of local events. Thus the maiming of a horse took a share of ink and precious parchment from one of the most momentous events of the twelfth century, the murder of Archbishop Thomas Becket. To read this exquisite compendium is to imagine monkish figures bent over quills in poor light, huddling beneath their cowls. They nurse the warmth of guttering candle-flame fanned by winter drafts in a dark scriptorium. Add the sound of wind, a scratching quill, an island of flickering light in a darkness of damp stone, and that vision completes this text.

"The Plantagenet Chronicles" grew, story by story, layer upon layer, until men such as Ralph of Coggeshall and Ralph de Diceto had compiled a curious mixture; several centuries worth of major and minor events in medieval France and England. And what centuries! Unceasing violence and prayer, fear and the clash of mortal enemies, life under the spiritual and temporal threats of priests and overlords. Here is the failure of King Henry II's and the German emperor's crusade, brought down because "God despised [the armies], for they abandoned themselves to open fornication and to adulteries hateful to God..." On the other hand, when monkish opinion detected the Almighty's favor, the Chronicles bring us entry upon entry of the blood-stained heroics that built Henry II's Angevin empire, a swathe of the richest land in Europe stretching from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees.

If much of "The Plantagenet Chronicles" leads us through the building of King Henry's empire, the closing chapters tear that empire down: the book draws to a close after the barons forced the Magna Carta on King John, just after the fates of France and England were finally severed and ripped apart. The temper of the Chronicles is constant: immense events interweave with and surrender space to the mundane and the trite. Thus the chronicles end with the portentous death of King John and a priestly gutting of his character. But the last line belongs to local color, to the guts themselves: "His intestines...since he was rather fat, were interred in Croxton Abbey."

"The Plantagenet Chronicles" is a wonderful source-book, and an equally wonderful medieval blog. Its text offers doses of human foibles threading through a rich tapestry of superb, well-chosen illustrations.

Robert Fripp, Author, "Power of a Woman. Memoirs of... Eleanor of Aquitaine"
Xal
The wonder is that the components of this book were written by a host of contributors, many working more than a thousand years ago and centuries apart. Yet, in the careful hands of its translators and editors, "The Plantagenet Chronicles" brings us a cogent record of two and a half critical centuries. On the whole the original contributors managed to avoid self-consciousness--although self-righteousness was another matter. Many of the Chronicles' entries began life as personal letters. Great events of the day mixed with gossip and the trivia of local events. Thus the maiming of a horse took a share of ink and precious parchment from one of the most momentous events of the twelfth century, the murder of Archbishop Thomas Becket. To read this exquisite compendium is to imagine monkish figures bent over quills in poor light, huddling beneath their cowls. They nurse the warmth of guttering candle-flame fanned by winter drafts in a dark scriptorium. Add the sound of wind, a scratching quill, an island of flickering light in a darkness of damp stone, and the vision is complete.

"The Plantagenet Chronicles" grew, story by story, layer upon layer, until men such as Ralph of Coggeshall and Ralph de Diceto had compiled a curious mixture; several centuries worth of major and minor events in medieval France and England. And what centuries! Unceasing violence and prayer, fear and the clash of mortal enemies, life under the spiritual and temporal threats of priests and overlords. Here is the failure of King Henry II's and the German emperor's crusade, brought down because "God despised [the armies], for they abandoned themselves to open fornication and to adulteries hateful to God..." On the other hand, when monkish opinion detected the Almighty's favor, the Chronicles bring us entry upon entry of the blood-stained heroics that built Henry II's Angevin empire, a swathe of the richest land in Europe stretching from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Then comes that curious, love-hate relationship between the king and the queen who bore his sons, the subtle, driving Eleanor of Aquitaine.

If much of "The Plantagenet Chronicles" leads us through the building of King Henry's empire, the closing chapters tear that empire down: the book draws to a close after the barons forced the Magna Carta on King John, just after the fates of France and England were finally severed and torn apart. The temper of the Chronicles is constant: immense events interweave with and surrender space to the mundane and the trite. Thus the chronicles end with the portentous death of King John and a priestly gutting of his character. But the last line belongs to local color, to the guts themselves: "His intestines...since he was rather fat, were interred in Croxton Abbey."

"The Plantagenet Chronicles" is a wonderful source-book. Its text offers strong doses of human foibles that thread through a rich tapestry of superb, well-chosen illustrations.

Robert Fripp, Author, "Power of a Woman. Memoirs of a turbulent life: Eleanor of Aquitaine"
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