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Fb2 Empire: The British Imperial Experience From 1765 To The Present ePub

by Denis Judd

Category: Europe
Subcategory: History books
Author: Denis Judd
ISBN: 0465019528
ISBN13: 978-0465019526
Language: English
Publisher: Basic Books; First Edition edition (June 26, 1997)
Pages: 544
Fb2 eBook: 1415 kb
ePub eBook: 1528 kb
Digital formats: lrf mbr mobi azw

Dennis Judd's book on the history of the British Empire is not a day by day approach to empire but a focus on the most important events that shaped that empire. Things such as the India uprising in 1857 or the work of Cecil Rhodes are the main focus

Dennis Judd's book on the history of the British Empire is not a day by day approach to empire but a focus on the most important events that shaped that empire. Things such as the India uprising in 1857 or the work of Cecil Rhodes are the main focus. The stories that are chosen do an excellent job of showing how the empire developed and the path it took to formation. This really is the best single volume work on the British Empire in terms of a pure history. The book covers all parts of the Dennis Judd's book on the history of the British Empire is not a day by day approach to empire but a focus on the most important events that shaped that.

Denis Judd is a professor of British Imperial and Commonwealth History at the University of North London, and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society

Denis Judd is a professor of British Imperial and Commonwealth History at the University of North London, and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. Among his publications are Balfour and the British Empire, Radical Joe: A Life of Joseph Chamberlain, The Victorian Empire, Lord Reading, The Boer War, Someone Has Blundered, Palmerston, The British Raj, Jawaharlal Nehru, and, with Peter Slinn, The Evolution of the Modern Commonwealth. Dennis Judd's book on the history of the British Empire is not a day by day approach to empire but a focus on the most important events that shaped that empire.

Denis Judd is a prolific writer and no stranger to the Colonial Period. First, if you are interested in one portion of the Empire - be it a time period or an issue area, much of Judd's book will fall outside the particular area of concern

Denis Judd is a prolific writer and no stranger to the Colonial Period. He writes for a general rather than an academic audience and as a result his work is usually less turgid and more entertaining than so-called scholarly tomes. This massive work is out in paperback for a reasonable price and can likely be obtained through any book store. First, if you are interested in one portion of the Empire - be it a time period or an issue area, much of Judd's book will fall outside the particular area of concern. After all, the Empire goes on far longer that even the fringes of our list's period of interest. Not that there isn't fascinating history to be read here.

Dennis Judd's book on the history of the British Empire is not a day by day approach to empire but a focus on the most important events that shaped that empire. The book covers all parts of the empire and has interesting vignettes such as the formation of the boy scouts

About Your Professor Denis Judd Denis Judd is Professor of British and Commonwealth History at LondonĀ .

About Your Professor Denis Judd Denis Judd is Professor of British and Commonwealth History at London Metropolitan University. He was educated at Magdalen College, Oxford, going on to take his P. at the University of London. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a policy adviser to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Introduction In this lecture, we will explain how the Empire adjusted to the death of Queen Victoria and to the role of her successor, Edward VII.

The British Empire radically altered the modern world. Denis Judd's fine, magisterial history does full justice to a complex and epic theme. At its height, it governed over a quarter of the human race and encompassed more than a fifth of the globe. As well as providing the British people with profits and a sense of international purpose, the Empire afforded them the opportunity to create new lives for themselves through emigration and settlement. It supplied jobs at home and overseas, encouraged national aggrandizement, and allowed experiments in social engineering.

Book, Online - Google Books. Description Great Britain, great empire : an evaluation of the British imperial experience, W. Ross Johnston. British imperialism, 1750-1970, Simon C. Smith. London : HarperCollins, 1996 xiv, 517 . p. of plates : il. maps, ports. Great Britain, great empire : an evaluation of the British imperial experience, W. Critics of empire : British radicals and the imperial challenge, Bernard Porter. Find in other libraries.

At its height, the British Empire governed over a quarter of the human race and more than a fifth of the globe. This is a highly acclaimed single-volume study of the most influential imperial enterprise of the modern era. " Indispensable. an admirable chronology. I. B. Tauris & Company.

Item Information:Author : Judd, Denis. An evaluation of the British Imperial experience and a detailed analysis of the impact of Empire upon both the rulers and the ruled. Product Information:TITLE: Empire: The British Imperial Experience, from 1765 to the Present. We take pride in serving you. Publication Date : 04/03/1996. The work encompasses social, political, economic, military, cultural and analytical factors.

By the middle of the 18th century, writes English historian Denis Judd, theĀ .

Interesting to see how present governments are reacting identically to similiar geo-political issues.

The British Empire radically altered the modern world. At its height, it governed over a quarter of the human race and encompassed more than a fifth of the globe. As well as providing the British people with profits and a sense of international purpose, the Empire afforded them the opportunity to create new lives for themselves through emigration and settlement. It supplied jobs at home and overseas, encouraged national aggrandizement, and allowed experiments in social engineering. For those it ruled over, the Empire often represented arbitrary power, gunboat diplomacy, and the disruption of local customs, social structures, and government by a distant and sometimes coldly unsympathetic administration. Yet while the Empire rested ultimately upon military force and direct rule, it also pulsated with ideals—ideals of freedom, democracy, and even equality.In this impressively researched and always entertaining book, the esteemed British historian Denis Judd analyzes the imperial experience from the American revolution to the present day. He examines the ways in which the British Empire affected both rulers and ruled, and the roles of significant personalities—from Queen Victoria to Nelson Mandela, Cecil Rhodes to Jomo Kenyatta, Joseph Chamberlain to Mahatma GhandiWhat was so special about the ”special relationship” between Britain and the United States? Did the maintenance of the Empire artificially prolong Britain's Great Power status? Did it encourage chauvinistic, even racist, attitudes? Were subjects better off under their own elites and leaders than under British rule? In the end, what does the balance sheet of the Empire look like?The story of Empire is central to Britain's national mythology and its sense of place in the world, and essential to an understanding of its changing role as we approach the end of the millennium. Denis Judd's fine, magisterial history does full justice to a complex and epic theme.
Comments to eBook Empire: The British Imperial Experience From 1765 To The Present
Diredefender
Dennis Judd's book on the history of the British Empire is not a day by day approach to empire but a focus on the most important events that shaped that empire. Things such as the India uprising in 1857 or the work of Cecil Rhodes are the main focus. The stories that are chosen do an excellent job of showing how the empire developed and the path it took to formation. This really is the best single volume work on the British Empire in terms of a pure history. The book covers all parts of the empire and has interesting vignettes such as the formation of the boy scouts. It also covers some of the major internal domestic squabbles within Great Britain as they relate to empire. I found that the discussions on how world war 1 and 2 affected the empire were very accurate and to the point. The reader can get a very good sense of how the British were drained of resources by the wars and see the effect this had on empire. As nationalistic movements took root in the various countries the British found it more difficult to control. Particularly with the end of Lend Lease by Truman the British were forced to grant independence to their colonies. The last few chapters focus on the remaining parts of the empire and how they fit into the commonwealth including the struggle with the Falkland Islands. If the reader wants a much more detailed account of the empire try to the Oxford history five volume British Empire. Judd's account is very readable and well done for those wanting a review of the salient points in the Empire's history.
just one girl
Bought this for my British history class, gave a lot of great information, but it was in really bad condition, but still usable.
Ceroelyu
To read about the British Empire is to read about part of the history of many countries in almost all the continents in the world. I don't think I should be called anglophile, but If I had to pick the country with the more interesting and richest History, that for sure is the History of the British people. By reading this compelling pages, my opinion about the aftermath of all this is positive. Of course it was not perfect -- there were problems, violence, oppression, but if you look at Singapore, Honk Kong, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and others, I think is fair to say that British rule was positive, even more when it is compared to other expansionist European countries. Although India was the jewel of the empire, things here were complicated indeed, and even more difficult in Africa. The last country to achieve its independence in Africa was Rhodesia, now known as Zimbabwe, and with its first elected President Robert Mugabe, who still runs the country --- seems not to had been a good idea.

One good idea of the British, strategically speaking, was its pursue of dominion on any free island in the world. President Roosevelt even claimed once that "the British would take any land in the world, even if it were only a rock or a sanbar" --- I laughed at this comment but I think it was made in a moment when the United States resented some of the world presence of the British. Another good idea was the creation of the Commonwealth, a place of cooperation of the members and ex-members of this empire. Not least important were the sports, especially cricket and rugby, both invented by the British that undoubtedly still unite the members of this commonwealth. There are much more to say, the book covers even the Falklands war and Mandela's South Africa, but I have only one critic: although there is no explanation about it, at the beginning of the book there is a World Map indicating the Commonwealth in 1996, but including Chilean Antartic Territory as part of British Territory. I think is important for Britain and Chile to reach and agreement on this issue, even more, to increase and improve relations as countries.
Zahisan
As a historian I find that Mr Judd makes far too many ignorant and simplistic mistakes in this book for me to overlook. For instance he makes no distinction between Australia's or South Africa's Dominion status and Southern Rhodesia's self governing status, something anyone who studies the subject should know, the difference is remarkably important and greatly influenced why white-rule and segregation were eventually ended in that country (today Zimbabwe). His tone on the matter of self-governing settlers and his refusal to distinguish between Dominions and self-governing colonies (of which Southern Rhodesia was the only one) strongly implies that Britain was capable of dictating foreign policy to Australia and Canada during the 20th century! He also focuses an unnecessary amount on who was homosexual and he devotes dozens of pages to sexuality, particularly homosexuality throughout the Empire, which is childish and very beside the point. He also makes lazy broad generalizations such as referring to places like Burma and Ceylon as being part of the Raj in India; they were British territories but they were never in fact governed by the Raj, they were crown colonies with appointed governors much like Nigeria or Bermuda, Judd show's a remarkable inability to get these sorts of details right and there are so many of them that as someone who studies the British Empire in much depth this book was disgruntling and I find it to frankly be irresponsible to publish something so subtley and casually inaccurate and call yourself a historian. The amount of demonizing of the British that again, he does very subtly seems to hint and some sort of either Anglophobia or since he is from Britain, a distinct sense of self-loathing and which compounds his inaccuracies and gives me the impression he has some sort of angle here other than that of a historian. Do not buy this book if you want a good book on the history of the British Empire, as someone who is relatively obsessed with the topic, I would recommend the Rise and Fall of the British Empire by Lawrence James.
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