» » Rough Crossings CD: Britain, the Slaves, and the American Revolution

Fb2 Rough Crossings CD: Britain, the Slaves, and the American Revolution ePub

by Simon Schama

Category: Americas
Subcategory: History books
Author: Simon Schama
ISBN: 0061137022
ISBN13: 978-0061137020
Language: English
Publisher: HarperAudio; Abridged edition (April 25, 2006)
Fb2 eBook: 1371 kb
ePub eBook: 1471 kb
Digital formats: doc mbr rtf doc

In this book, Schama writes of the promise of freedom offered by the British Monarchy to the American slavesĀ .

In this book, Schama writes of the promise of freedom offered by the British Monarchy to the American slaves who were willing to serve on the side of the crown. The offer of course was not entirely altruistic; King George had much to gain from depriving the ungrateful colonists of their workforce. Then again, Southern planters were involved in the revolutionary movement.

Rough Crossings: The Slaves, the British, and the American Revolution Paperback. In this book, Schama writes of the promise of freedom offered by the British Monarchy to the American slaves who were willing to serve on the side of the crown

Rough Crossings: The Slaves, the British, and the American Revolution Paperback. In this book, Schama writes of the promise of freedom offered by the British Monarchy to the American slaves who were willing to serve on the side of the crown. But for the slaves this was an offer they couldn't refuse, and they were willing to risk life and limb to cross over to the British side.

Rough Crossings: The Slaves, the British, and the American Revolution. Schama's subject is not quite so lighthearted. Studying the lives of slaves and ex-slaves around the time of the American Revolution, Schama finds brutality, horror and the ever-present threat of a return to slavery, leading many blacks to embrace the British cause and the hope of freedom.

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Rough Crossings: Britain, the Slaves and the American Revolution is a history book by Simon Schama. It was the 2006 National Book Critics Circle Award winner for general nonfiction.

Simon Schama brings the story of 18th-century slavery brilliantly to life in Rough Crossings, says James Walvin. Schama's story begins with the American revolution. Many of those who led America to independence were slave-owners. Jefferson and Washington both owned slaves, and both anguished over the morality of slavery. But they and their fellow revolutionaries were never able to establish black freedom as a principle of the new American republic. Slavery poisoned the ideals of American democracy from its birth, and created a troublesome political and social inheritance from that day to this.

Rough Crossings" focuses on the black American role in the Revolution and, most particularly, on the tens of thousands of slaves who fled to British lines after Lord Dunmore issued a proclamation in November 1775 offering slaves from rebel plantations freedom in return for service t. .

Rough Crossings" focuses on the black American role in the Revolution and, most particularly, on the tens of thousands of slaves who fled to British lines after Lord Dunmore issued a proclamation in November 1775 offering slaves from rebel plantations freedom in return for service to the crown. It was for the most part a nightmare journey.

His award-winning books include Scribble, Scribble, Scribble; The American Future: A History; National Book Critics Circle Award winner Rough Crossings; The Power of Art; The Embarrassment of Riches: An Interpretation of Dutch Culture in the Golden Age; Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution; Dead Certainties (Unwarranted Speculations); Landscape and Memory; Rembrandt's Eyes; and the History of Britain trilogy.

Rough Crossings Britain the Slaves & the American Revolution. Rough Crossings is a well-told history. For those looking for something more acerbic than yet another hagiography about the Founding Fathers, Schama offers an impressive and challenging alternative.

Rough Crossings turns on a single huge question: if you were black in America at the start of the Revolutionary War, who would you want to win?

Tens of thousands gave their answer, voting with their feet for Britain and King George. In response to a declaration by the last governor of Virginia that any rebel-owned slave who escaped and served the King would be emancipated, tens of thousands of slaves-Americans who clung to the sentimental notion of British freedom -- escaped from farms, plantations, and cities to try to reach the British camp. This mass movement lasted as long as the war did, and a military strategy originally designed to break the plantations of the American South had unleashed one of the great exoduses in American history.

With powerfully vivid storytelling, often in the voices of the slaves themselves and the white abolitionists who became their emancipators and protectors, Schama details the odyssey of the escaped blacks through the fires of war and the terror of potential recapture at the war's end, into inhospitable Nova Scotia, where thousands who had served the Crown were betrayed and, in a little-known hegira of the slave epic, sent across the broad, stormy ocean to Sierra Leone.

Comments to eBook Rough Crossings CD: Britain, the Slaves, and the American Revolution
Bluecliff
This book's account about the role of slaves in the Revolutionary War apparently offers a surprise to many American readers as Simon Schama details the mass flight of the Southern States escaped and freed slaves to fight the revolutionaries on the English side. This historical fact was so little known it was called the "dirty little secret" of the war. The work continues the story of those slaves through to their escape to hardship in Acadia, New Foundland, Nova Scotia and even England, and describes the fate for many of ultimate betrayal, along with many thousands of white "Royalists", who also choose to fight on the losing side.
Schama, as usual in his excellent works, offers the reader a gripping view of history, and he brings the account up into the period of the politics of Wilberforce and the English "Abolition Movement", the and eventual emancipation. His account of the corrupted ideals and confusions of the attempted creation of new lands in Africa is fascinating, giving new details of the founding of the colony of Sierra Leone. Further betrayals awaited many of the original African settlers, even to re-sale back into the West Indies slave trade.
A sad and important story.
Gravelblade
Schama unabashedly, and provocatively, studies the past from a moral viewpoint. In Citizens, he lengthily propounds the thesis that the French Revolution's violence was inherent from the very start and was not a perversion brought about by Jacobin terror. In this book, he seeks to introduce a discordant note in the traditional narratives of the American Revolution: Yes, it was a step forward in the story of freedom, but, no, it was a step back for American slaves who rushed to British lines after the redcoats offered freedom in exchange for serving George III. A remarkable story that led some men and women from Africa, to the American colonies, to Nova Scotia, and finally to Sierra Leone told in an unapologetically literary style.
uspeh
Very interesting account of the black experience during and after the American War of Independence, showing that the war for liberty was quite flawed in its ideology, because most of the slaves (including George Washington's) wanted to be in the British lines. Schama is very critical of the Americans - makes a change from the rosy accounts of the Revolution - but he doesn't skimp on showing British hypocrisy, describing how British politicians were often influenced by West Indian plantation owners, and thus stopped the abolition of slavery.

Very good book.
Samardenob
For those readers who enjoyed last year's best seller, David McCullough's "1776," the present volume by Simon Schama will show the events of that same period in a whole new light. Once you thought you had the definitive story, a book such as this comes along and turns the story upside down. In this book, Schama writes of the promise of freedom offered by the British Monarchy to the American slaves who were willing to serve on the side of the crown. The offer of course was not entirely altruistic; King George had much to gain from depriving the ungrateful colonists of their workforce. But for the slaves this was an offer they couldn't refuse, and they were willing to risk life and limb to cross over to the British side.

Much has been said about the Founding Fathers and the fact that they were slaveholders; Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin had all anguished over the morality of it. Yet not only did they retain their slaves, they acquiesced to the southern slaveholding states to allow it in order to get the constitution ratified. This poisoned the republic from the beginning and festered until it erupted with the Civil War many years later. It was one of the tragic ironies of the American Revolution; for all their high-minded ideals of independence and freedom, they could not let go of the institution of slavery which had given them their prosperity.

Schama's wonderfully written account of this little-mentioned struggle is very engaging and sorrowful. Those slaves who found themselves under British rule after 1787 were shipped either to Nova Scotia, the Carribean, or London, where they encountered new hardships and a sense of betrayal. To a great extent the British, having lost their struggle to control the colonists, were looking for places to unload their new subjects. In this sordid affair, Schama finds some heroic characters. One of these characters was Thomas Peter, who was one of the ex-slaves shipped off to the barren and chilly Nova Scotia, where the land they had been promised was virtually uninhabitable. In 1971, Peters went to London representing 202 families to plead with the British government to ship them back to Africa. As Schama tells it, Peters was the first genuine African-American political leader.

The other unsung heroes were the abolitionists Granville Sharp and Thomas Clarkson, both of whom relentlessly challenged the institution of slavery through the courts. There was also John Clarkson, Thomas's younger brother and Royal Navy captain, who was responsible for resettling thousands of ex-slaves from Nova Scotia to Sierra Leone.

The promised land of Sierra Leone turned out initially to be another tragedy. Not only were their high expectations of freedom not met, they encountered lingering slavery, disease, and death. Yet with the persistence of the ex-slaves and the abolitionists, Freetown became by the end of the 1790's a thriving community. Schama has done a magnificent job of telling the story of this struggle and giving a voice to those who ultimately made it succeed.
Andromajurus
Was the American Revolution really about slavery? The first suggestion that all slaves should be freed, took place in England about 1722, and was accomplished in the entire British Empire in the early 1800's. Then again, Southern planters were involved in the revolutionary movement. This book is one of two referenced in a paper about this topic.
Mpapa
It seems like Simon Schama cannot help of writing excellent stuff. In this case he does it again offering information about an scarcely known issue with a masterly description of many personages of low and high level and guessing, when documents cannot be supplied, what probably was like by and with a wonderful and clever imagination. Humor does not lack at all, but also a compassionate, deep view of human feelings and situations. It is a must for every history geek.
Malarad
Extremely interesting, however, it is rather long. You will need some time to listen to it and keep up. Listening 15 - 20 minute intervals is not the best way. An hour or more at a time is the best way.
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