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Fb2 Five Indian Tribes of the Upper Missouri: Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees, Crows (The Civilization of the American Indian Series) ePub

by Edwin Thompson Denig

Category: Americas
Subcategory: History books
Author: Edwin Thompson Denig
ISBN: 0806113081
ISBN13: 978-0806113081
Language: English
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press; New edition edition (December 15, 1975)
Pages: 260
Fb2 eBook: 1384 kb
ePub eBook: 1176 kb
Digital formats: lrf mbr mobi lit

Edwin Thompson Denig, for more than twenty years a fur trader on the Upper Missouri and married to an. .Only 6 left in stock (more on the way)

Edwin Thompson Denig, for more than twenty years a fur trader on the Upper Missouri and married to an Assiniboine woman. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).

Edwin Thompson Denig. Article in American Anthropologist 64(3):657 - 658 · October 2009 with 54 Reads. Brian Cole, a native of southeast Missouri, is the academic programs coordinator with the Appalachian Ministries Education Resource Center in Berea, Kentucky

Edwin Thompson Denig. Brian Cole, a native of southeast Missouri, is the academic programs coordinator with the Appalachian Ministries Education Resource Center in Berea, Kentucky. He is a graduate of Murray State University and Southern Seminary.

Edwin Thompson Denig, for more than twenty years a fur trader on the Upper Missouri and married to an Assiniboine woman .

Edwin Thompson Denig, for more than twenty years a fur trader on the Upper Missouri and married to an Assiniboine woman, was an acute and objective observer of Indian manners and customs. Denig’s writings on the Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees, and Crows, comprising the Denig manuscript in the Missouri Historical Society, are published together for the first time in this book. The manuscript long had been referred to as the "Culbertson Manuscript" because it had been purchased from a descendant of the fur-trader naturalist Alexander Culbertson. But in 1949, handwriting experts identified it as the work of Denig.

Start by marking Five Indian Tribes of the Upper Missouri: Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees and Crows (Civilization of the American Indian Series, No 59) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Five Indian Tribes of the Upper Missouri: Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees and Crows (Civilization of the American Indian Series, No 59). by. Edwin Thompson Denig. Edwin Thompson Denig, for more than twenty years a fur trader on the Upper Missouri and married to an Assiniboine woman, was an acute and objective observer of Indian manners and customs.

Series Title: Civilization of the American Indian. He assisted Audubon and the Culbertsons in collecting Missouri River fauna, supplied information on the Indians to Father De Smet, who encouraged him to write, and provided Henry Schoolcraft with an Assiniboine vocabulary as well as a detailed "Report on the Indian Tribes of the Upper Missouri," which was not published until 1930, seventy-six years after it was written, and then only.

For further biographic information, see Edwin Thompson Denig, Five Indian Tribes of the Upper Missouri: Sioux .

Fort Union trading post was constructed by the American Fur Company in 1828 and was located near the confluence of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers. These are the original drawings that accompanied Edwin Thompson Denig's 451 page manuscript, entitled "Report to Hon. Isaac I. Stevens, Governor of Washington Territory, on the Indian Tribes of the Upper Missouri, by Edwin Thompson Denig.

Author: Author's name as listed in Library of Congress records Denig, Edwin Thompson, 1812-1858 Ewers, John C. (John Canfield), 1909-1997

The general ethnographic sketch is accompanied by a fairly lengthy biography of Chief Rotten Belly who died in 1834, and several biographical sketches of other contemporary Crow leaders of note. Valuable data are included regarding the relationship of the Crow to the early traders and trading posts. Author: Author's name as listed in Library of Congress records Denig, Edwin Thompson, 1812-1858 Ewers, John C. (John Canfield), 1909-1997. Title: Five Indian tribes of the upper Missouri: Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees, Crows. Published By: Original publisher Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press.

029051) Denig, Edwin Thompson. B&W Illustrations. Spine faded (Indians). Five Indian Tribes Of The Upper Missouri: Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees, Crows. Of Oklahoma Press, 1973.

item 1 The Civilization of the American Indian Series: Five Indian Tribes of the Upper -The Civilization of the American Indian .

item 1 The Civilization of the American Indian Series: Five Indian Tribes of the Upper -The Civilization of the American Indian Series: Five Indian Tribes of the Upper. item 3 Denig Edwin Thompson-5 Indian Tribes Of The Upper M (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -Denig Edwin Thompson-5 Indian Tribes Of The Upper M (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW.

Edwin Thompson Denig, for more than twenty years a fur trader on the Upper Missouri and married to an Assiniboine woman, was an acute and objective observer of Indian manners and customs. He assisted Audubon and the Culbertsons in collecting Missouri River fauna, supplied information on the Indians to Father De Smet, who encouraged him to write, and provided Henry Schoolcraft with an Assiniboine vocabulary as well as a detailed "Report on the Indian Tribes of the Upper Missouri," which was not published until 1930, seventy-six years after it was written, and then only in parts.

Denig’s writings on the Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees, and Crows, comprising the Denig manuscript in the Missouri Historical Society, are published together for the first time in this book. The manuscript long had been referred to as the "Culbertson Manuscript" because it had been purchased from a descendant of the fur-trader naturalist Alexander Culbertson. But in 1949, handwriting experts identified it as the work of Denig.

Comments to eBook Five Indian Tribes of the Upper Missouri: Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees, Crows (The Civilization of the American Indian Series)
Agamaginn
Alot of first hand accounts and narratives. An excellent read.
hardy
While doing some research to write a western, I came across this book. What a research resource. Packed full of rich history and very often some graphic and little known facts of the Missouri River tribes.
Fordrelis
Good companion read for Ewers account of the five tribes on the Missouri.
Swiang
great book have loaned it to several friends
Doath
Not that bad considering it's straight exposition. Since the info is all derived from either first-hand observation or from talking to the Indians and traders as peers it's free from academic stodginess. There's also a fair amount of anecdote which livens things somewhat. I'm a little disappointed that the author omitted certain material because it was too filthy and disgusting. Nothing's too filthy or disgusting for me. There was, however, a couple juicy items in the section about the Crows. For one thing, the young bucks were totally shameless about having sex in full view of others. And the other was a footnote that said the Crows were so horny they'd have sex with their mares and freshly killed animals! Wow! Cool!

But you really gotta be a die hard frontier narrative fan to slog through this.
Zymbl
no comment
Walan
Edwin Denig lived from 1812 to 1858. The manuscripts for this book were written in 1855-56. Denig, who had two Indian wives, and children by them, began trapping for the American Fur Company in 1833, and rose to authority at Fort Union. He didn't leave Indian territory until 1855. See the editor's introduction for more details on Denig and on how the first four chapters of this book were not published until 1950-52 and the fifth chapter not until a year later.

The book has historical value, and it is interesting in its own right, but don't expect detailed histories of the Sioux, Arickaras, Assiniboines, Crees, and Crows. Denig knew these tribes through experience, and what he does is give a short ethnography of each tribe, writing about the boundaries and geography of their territories, what they eat, who they fight, who the leaders are, an interesting story or two, and so forth. He intended to write a far more comprehensive book, but this is all there is of it.

"It would be well for the public if everyone who undertook to write a book was thoroughly acquainted with the subject of which he treats, but unfortunately this is not the case - authors spring up everywhere, and the community is saddled with an immense effusion of literature, the greater part of which when divested of the writer's own fancies and feelings, and submitted to the test of truth and experience, amounts to nothing. This is particularly the case in works purporting to describe the actual life and intellectual capacity of the Indians of North America; much evil has been the consequence of error thus introduced, bad feelings engendered, and unwise legislation enforced, which will continue until our rulers are enlightened as to the real state of their Government, character, organization, manner and customs, and social position. [...] Hence we find two sets of writers both equally wrong, one setting forth the Indians as a noble, generous, and chivalrous race far above the standard of Europeans, the other representing them below the level of the brute creation. People cannot form an opinion in this way [...]." (xxx-xxxi)
An outstanding book; I loaned mine to someone, can't remember to whom. Will buy another one. Two books, including Comanches by TR Fehrenbach, are too similar in their portrayal of the Amerindian to suggest that the authors are prejudiced. I am convinced that Denig called it as he saw it. The writing might seem pompous but that's the way authors wrote in those days. However, the importance of these books (Five Indian Tribes and Comanches) is to help Americans understand what is going on in Iraq today. Talk about relevance. Go back and read the NY Times article about the five Iraqi tribes in the immediate area protecting Saddam before he was captured. It is absolutely uncanny to see the parallels between the Amerindians in the 1800's and the Iraqi tribes today. During the time when I lived in that part of the world (Turkey, Syria, Iraq) my first thought was, my God, these are just like the Indians I grew up with in Williston, North Dakota. Absolutely uncanny. So, I wouldn't waste my time arguing about the picture these authors paint about these people; I would rather use these books to help understand and explain what is going on in Iraq today.
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