» » Nobody Turn Me Around: A People's History of the 1963 March on Washington

Fb2 Nobody Turn Me Around: A People's History of the 1963 March on Washington ePub

by Charles Euchner

Category: Americas
Subcategory: History books
Author: Charles Euchner
ISBN: 0807000590
ISBN13: 978-0807000595
Language: English
Publisher: Beacon Press; 1st edition (June 29, 2010)
Pages: 256
Fb2 eBook: 1706 kb
ePub eBook: 1714 kb
Digital formats: azw docx lrf txt

Euchner has turned the March on Washington into a ‘people’s history. Readers who want to learn about the March and the Dream will enjoy this new history of the 1963 March on Washington.

Euchner has turned the March on Washington into a ‘people’s history. Compelling and dramatic, this book is an important contribution. Juan Williams, author of Eyes On The Prize and news analyst for NPR and Fox News A sharp, riveting depiction of what Martin Luther King called the greatest demonstration for freedom in the nation’s history.

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History books record August 28, 1963, as the day when over a quarter-million people rallied in Washington, in the .

History books record August 28, 1963, as the day when over a quarter-million people rallied in Washington, in the first-ever nationally televised demonstrationwhen Dr. Martin Luther King, J. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream" oration. But as Charles Euchner reveals inNobody Turn Me Around,the march's significance is more surprising and complex than standard treatments allow

Includes bibliographical references (p. 215-226). The longest march - Night unto dawn - Into the day - Congregation - Dream - Onward

Includes bibliographical references (p. The longest march - Night unto dawn - Into the day - Congregation - Dream - Onward. Draws on the oral histories of more than one hundred participants to provide a behind-the-scenes look at the historic 1963 March on Washington that culminated in Martin Luther King J. s "I Have a Dream" speech.

As Charles Euchner reveals, the importance of the march is more profound and complex than standard treatments of the 1963 March on Washington allow. In this major reinterpretation of the Great Day-the peak of the movement-Euchner brings back the tension and promise of that day. Building on countless interviews, archives, FBI files, and private recordings, Euchner shows freedom fighters as complex, often conflicted, characters. A lecturer in writing at Yale University, Euchner was the founding executive director of the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston at Harvard University.

On August 28, 1963, over a quarter-million people-two-thirds black and one-third white-held the greatest civil rights .

On August 28, 1963, over a quarter-million people-two-thirds black and one-third white-held the greatest civil rights demonstration ever. In this major reinterpretation of the Great Day-the peak of the movement-Charles Euchner brings back the tension and promise of the march. 2 people like this topic.

Clothing In this major reinterpretation of the Great Day-the peak of the movement-Charles Euchner brings back th. .

Draws on the oral histories of more than one hundred participants to provide a behind-the-scenes look at the historic 1963 March on Washington that culminated in Martin Luther King J. On August 28, 1963, over a quarter-million people-two-thirds black and one-third white-held the greatest civil rights demonstration ever.

Nobody Turn Me Around

Nobody Turn Me Around. A People's History of the 1963 March on Washington. Your purchase helps support NPR programming. Independent Booksellers. In a book that draws on oral histories of more than 100 participants, the author offers a behind-the-scenes look at the historic 1963 March on Washington that culminated in Martin Luther King J. s "I Have a Dream" speech, revealing Malcolm X's secret vow to help the march, despite mocking it publicly; how King really wrote his speech; and.

Book Description: On August 28, 1963, over a quarter-million people-two-thirds black and one-third white-held the .

Book Description: On August 28, 1963, over a quarter-million people-two-thirds black and one-third white-held the greatest civil rights demonstration ever.

On August 28, 1963, over a quarter-million people—about two-thirds black and one-third white—held the greatest civil rights demonstration ever. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his iconic “I Have a Dream” oration. And just blocks away, President Kennedy and Congress skirmished over landmark civil rights legislation. As Charles Euchner reveals, the importance of the march is more profound and complex than standard treatments of the 1963 March on Washington allow.   In this major reinterpretation of the Great Day—the peak of the movement—Euchner brings back the tension and promise of that day. Building on countless interviews, archives, FBI files, and private recordings, Euchner shows freedom fighters as complex, often conflicted, characters. He explores the lives of Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin, the march organizers who worked tirelessly to make mass demonstrations and nonviolence the cornerstone of the movement. He also reveals the many behind-the-scenes battles—the effort to get women speakers onto the platform, John Lewis’s damning speech about the federal government, Malcolm X’s biting criticisms and secret vows to help the movement, and the devastating undercurrents involving political powerhouses Kennedy and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover. For the first time, Euchner tells the story behind King’s “Dream” images.   Euchner’s hour-by-hour account offers intimate glimpses of the masses on the National Mall—ordinary people who bore the scars of physical violence and jailings for fighting for basic civil rights. The event took on the call-and-response drama of a Southern church service, as King, Lewis, Mahalia Jackson, Roy Wilkins, and others challenged the throng to destroy Jim Crow once and for all.   Nobody Turn Me Around will challenge your understanding of the March on Washington, both in terms of what happened but also regarding what it ultimately set in motion. The result was a day that remains the apex of the civil rights movement—and the beginning of its decline.
Comments to eBook Nobody Turn Me Around: A People's History of the 1963 March on Washington
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
As a young adult of the 60s, I lived through the civil rights movement, so I found this book fascinating as it provides an accurate history of the movement. As the current CNN review of this decade illustrates, it was an important time in the history of our country and one well worth revisiting as we seem to be yet again fighting for the civil rights of so many of our citizens.
TheSuspect
I found this book fascinating and full of facts that I did not know and some that corrobarated what I did. Used the book for an intranet article at my jobs Diversity Council and we were hard pressed to decide how to keep the article to the required 600 words because there was so much info we didn't want to leave out!! Definitely recommend to those interested in the 1963 March.
Steelraven
Bought so the grandkids would know what went on in 1963 and Martin Luther King.
Skunk Black
"Nobody Turn Me Around" is an unusual title for a history book about the 1963 march on Washington, but as you read this extremely well written book, you will have a personal understanding of what went into the decisions to have and/or go to the march on the part of a quarter million people. The title comes from a song sung by demonstrators in the civil rights era, which resonates as you hear the personal stories of some of the marchers, blended well with the historical accounting of the decisions on the parts of civil rights leaders that led to the march, and the drama that could have made it fractious but didn't. I felt like I really knew the inner workings of the leaders after reading the book. Looking back, you would think that the march was achieved to perfection with well thought through processes and systems that worked like a charm. When you read this book, what you find is that some of the aspects of the march were done extraordinarily well, but other parts of it could have been a disaster had there not been cooler heads, smart negotiations, and the wisdom of Philip Randolph. "Nobody Turn Me Around" is a nonfiction page turner, well worth the read.
Billy Granson
Very nice read, the author moves from person to person, really keeps your attention, while still giving you a good understanding of the event.
Agrainel
August 28, 1963, has become an iconic moment in American history. It was the day of the celebrated March on Washington and of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr's "I have a Dream Speech" on the National Mall. Over 250,000 Americans of all races, creeds and walks of life came together for a moment. The specific goal was to secure enactment of Civil Rights legislation, but in King's dream of equality, freedom, and brotherhood, the March transcended that purpose.

Charles Euchner's new book, Nobody Turn Me Around: A People's History of the 1963 March on Washington" (2010) is an eloquently impressionistic history of the March. Euchner's history meanders into several byways but builds slowly to a grand climax in describing this historic day. The book discusses the historical figures involved in the March, such as Dr. King, Bayard Rustin, the organizer, Phillip Randolph, Whitney Young, Roy Willkins, Walter Reuther, John Lewis and many more. But it also tells the story of many of the people who travelled on buses, trains, cars, bikes, roller skates, and on foot to attend. Their stories will not usually be recounted in standard histories, and they deserve to be remembered.

The flow of the book moves back and forth. The scene shifts from the organization of the March in Washington D.C. and Harlem to the many communities throughout the United States that were home to the March's participants. Frequently, Euchner will introduce a character and describe that person's role, large or small in the events of the day. Then he will provide a biography or other brief history of that person showing how he or she became involved with the Civil Rights movement and made the decision to participate in the March. The story gains force as it unfolds. Bayard Rustin, the brilliantly gifted but troubled organizer of the March, receives the attention he merits.

Much of the book shows how the six leading Civil Rights organizations of the day, together with four other groups making up "The Ten" put aside their differences in philosophy and goals to come together for the March. The organizers had to scale down their expectations and their militancy in some cases to work together and to appeal to the broad spectrum of Americans who had no strong views on Civil Rights. Initial plans, which included marching on Congress and sit-ins were scaled back to include only the roughly one mile March on the Mall and the day of speeches and songs. The organizers of the March worked with the Kennedy administration, but they ultimately carried and presented their own vision.

With its history of the era, the book esssentially makes a chronological presentation of the day, from the arrival of the buses and marchers, to the gathering on the Mall, the March, and the speakers. Each speaker at the event gets a biography and description which sometimes disrupts the flow of the narrative. John Lewis' fiery speech, which was reluctantly toned down to avoid antagonizing the Archbishop of Washington, D.C. receives substantial attention. Euchner's descriptions of two different types of singers, Marian Anderson and Mahalia Jackson, and their performances on the Mall was highly moving, as was the discussion of the speech of Rabbi Jacob Printz, who had fled from Nazi Germany and immediately preceeded Dr. King on the podium. Dr. King's unforgettable speech is the climax of this book, as it was of the March, and is described in detail.

With the passage of time, the March on Washington has become a symbol of the possibilities and hope of American life. It provided a rare moment of peace, vision, unity, and the quest for justice. Readers who want to learn about the March and the Dream will enjoy this new history of the 1963 March on Washington.

Robin Friedman
Arador
I recently learned of another excellent "people's history" book that other history buffs will want to check out.
It is a 1963 "comic" book called "The Montgomery Story". It tells the story behind MLK and the organization of the also historic 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. The success of that non-violent protest was used as the inspiration for the book which was self-published by a group known as the Fellowship of Reconciliation. This "book" helped build support for the much larger 1963 march. It's available free as a PDF at [...]
I highly recommend it as well.
A brief, but comprehensive retelling of the March on Washington in August 1963. The KKK and the FBI make their appearances, along with the Kennedys, LBJ., the leadership for human rights, and others who were not central to the march, but who were there.
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